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Why Vegan

Why Vegan

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Published by Morpheus42

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Morpheus42 on Nov 11, 2009
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03/04/2013

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When confronted with a bellowing cow,meat industry consultant and Professorof Animal Sciences, Dr. Temple Grandinnoted, “That’s one sad, unhappy, upsetcow. She wants her baby.Bellowing for it, hunting for it.It’s like grieving, mourning –not much written about it.People don’t like to allowthem thoughts or feelings.”
A
A
NTHROPOLOGIST ON 
ARS 
,
1995 
U.S. society is extremely naive about thenature of agricultural production. Contraryto the beliefs of some elements of theagricultural community, however, it willnot help to “educate” the public. In fact,if the public knew more about the way inwhich agricultural and animal productioninfringes on animal welfare, the outcrywould be louder.
Bernard Rollin,PhD
ARM 
A
NIMAL 
ELFARE 
,
Iowa State University Press,1995 
The decision that has led millionsof people to stop eating otheranimals is not rooted in aridadherence to diet or dogma,but in the desire to eliminate thekinds of experiences that usinganimals for food confers uponbeings with feelings.
Karen Davis,PhD
RISONED 
HICKENS 
,
OISONED 
GGS 
1996 
Why
 
VEGAN?Why
 
VEGAN?Why
 
VEGAN?
WhVEGAN? 
A1997 Roper Poll estimatedthe number of vegans in theU.S.to be between one-halfand two million.This brochure explains whypeople choose to followa vegan lifestyle – strivingto live without contributingto animal suffering.A1997 Roper Poll estimatedthe number of vegans in theU.S.to be between one-halfand two million.This brochure explains whypeople choose to followa vegan lifestyle – strivingto live without contributingto animal suffering.
 
Institutionalized Cruelty:Factory Farming
A
COMMONNOTIONISTHATDEADANIMALS
areof no use to agribusiness; therefore, farmedanimals must be treated well. This notionis mistaken.The worldwide trend in animal agriculture is toreplace family farms, such as those seen fromcountry roads, with corporate farms rarely seenby the public.These factory farms are large warehouseswhere animals are kept in crowded pens ortiny, individual stalls. Large numbers of beef cattle, dairy cows, pigs, chickens, and turkeysare raised under such conditions. (Animalagriculture textbook
 S 
CIENTIFIC 
 ARM 
A
 NIMAL
 P 
 RODUCTION 
(SFAP),
1998)One need only glance through farm industrymagazines to see that these ‘intensive rearing’systems are promoted as necessary for theproduction of low-cost animal products.Putting animals in small spaces causes someto die, but as a group, the net production ishigher.
 N 
 ATIONAL
OG
 ARMER
suggests that“Crowding pigs pays” in an article recommend-ing space be reduced from 8 to 6 square feetper pig (11/15/93).Bernard Rollin, PhD,explains that it is “moreeconomically efficient to puta greater number of birdsinto each cage, acceptinglower productivity per birdbut greater productivity percage…individual animalsmay ‘produce,for examplegain weight, in part becausethey are immobile, yet sufferbecause of the inability tomove…Chickens are cheap,cages are expensive.”(Rollin, B.,
 F 
 ARM 
A
 NIMAL
 ELFARE
 ,
Iowa State UPress, 1995)
This [video footage from the movie Babe]is the way Americans want to think of pigs.Real-life “Babes” see no sun in their limitedlives, with no hay to lie on, no mud to rollin. The sows live in tiny cages, so narrowthey can’t even turn around. They live overmetal grates, and their waste is pushedthrough slats beneath them and flushedinto huge pits.
Morley Safer
Pork Power,60 M 
INUTES 
,
9/19/97 
Forget the pig is an animal. Treat him justlike a machine in a factory.
John Byrnes
OG 
ARM 
ANAGEMENT 
,
9/76 
 Anti-Corporate Hog Farming is Anti-Progress
title of an article in F 
EEDSTUFFS 
,
5/15/95 
THETRANSFORMATION OF ANIMALS INTO FOOD 
Competition to produce inexpensive meat, eggs, and dairy products has inevitablyled animal agribusiness to treat animals as commodities rather than living, feelingbeings. Animal cruelty laws in the U.S. normally exempt “standard agricultural prac-tices.Those standard practices have resulted in tremendous suffering, a portion of which is documented here.
Many breeding sows spend their whole adult lives in gestation and farrowing stalls wherethey cannot turn around.
2
 
In his textbook,
ONTEMPORARY 
 SSUES IN 
A
 NIMAL
 A
GRICULTURE
 ,
Oregon State University Professorof AnimalAgriculture Peter Cheeke states,“Most people who eat meat don’t think toodeeply about all the processes involved in con-verting a living animal to meat on their plate.The farther one is removed from agriculture,the easier it is not to think about this issue.One of the best things modern animal agricul-ture has going for it is that most people in thedeveloped countries are several generationsremoved from the farm, and haven’t a cluehow animals are raised and ‘processed.In myopinion, if most urban meat-eaters were tovisit an industrial broiler house, to see how thebirds are raised, and could see the birds being‘harvested’ and then being ‘processed’ in apoultry processing plant, they would not beimpressed and some, perhaps many of themwould swear off eating chicken and perhaps allmeat. For modern animal agriculture, the lessthe consumer knows about what’s happeningbefore the meat hits the plate, the better.If true, is this an ethical situation? Should we[animal agriculture] be reluctant to let peopleknow what really goes on, because we’re notreally proud of it and concerned that it mightturn them to vegetarianism?” (Cheeke,1999)
Birds 
In the U.S., farmed birds are raised entirelyunder factory-farmed conditions.(Cheeke,1999)Under these crowded, stressful conditions,chickens peck eachother. To combatthis, workers cutoff up to two-thirds of theirbeaks withoutanesthesia (shownat right). Cuttingthese delicatetissues with ahot knife causessevere pain forweeks
(B
 R
OULTRY 
 S 
CI 
 ,
1989;30:479).Some birds cannoteat after debeakingand starve(Rollin,1995).In poorly ventilated buildings, manure fumesexacerbate respiratory infectionsand cause“ammonia burn” (keratoconjunctivitis) in somechickens’ eyes.
(D
 ISEASES OF 
OULTRY 
 ,
1997)
 A1998 undercover investigation of a pigfactory farm found workers viciously beatinganinjuredsowwithaclub,attempting to killher by repeatedly dropping a cinder block on her head, and then skinning her alive.
(video available; see page15) 
With increased knowledge of the behaviourand cognitive abilities of the chicken, hascome the realization that the chicken is notan inferior species to be treated merely asa food source.
Dr.Lesley J.Rogers
Professor of Physiology 
HE 
EVELOPMENT OF 
RAIN AND 
EHAVIOUR IN THE 
HICKEN 
,
1995 
 According to experts, broilers[chickens raised for meat]now grow so rapidly thatthe heart and lungs are notdeveloped well enough tosupport the remainder of thebody, resulting in congestiveheart failure and tremendousdeath losses.
David Martin
EEDSTUFFS 
,
5/26/97 
3

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