Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
(eBook - ITA - NARR) Master, Edgar Lee - Spoon River Anthology (PDF)

(eBook - ITA - NARR) Master, Edgar Lee - Spoon River Anthology (PDF)

Ratings:

5.0

(1)
|Views: 942 |Likes:
Published by birraaroundtheworld

More info:

Published by: birraaroundtheworld on Nov 14, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/24/2012

pdf

text

original

 
 Edgar Lee Master 
Spoon River Anthology
T
HE HILL
Where are Elmer, Herman, Bert, Tom and Charley,The weak of will, the strong of arm, the clow, theboozer, the fighter?All, all, are sleeping on the hill.One passed in a fever,One was burned in a mine,One was killed in a brawl,One died in a jailOne fell from a bridge toiling for children and wife —All, all are sleeping , sleeping, sleeping on the hill.Where are Ella, Kare, Mag, Lizzie and Edith,The tender heart, the simple soul, the loud, the proud,the happy one? —All, all, are sleeping on the hill.One died in shamful child-birth,One of a thwarted love,One at the hands of a brute in a brothel,One of a broken pride, in the search for heart’s desire,One after life in far-away London and ParisWas brought to her little space by Ella and Kare andMag —All, all, are sleeping, sleeping, sleeping on the hill.Where are Uncle Isaac and Aunt Emily,And old Towny Kincaid and Sevigne Houghton,And Major Walker who talkedWith venerable men of the revolution? —All, all, are sleeping on the hill.They brought them dead sons from the war,And daughters whom life had crushed,And their children fatherless, crying —All, all, are sleeping, sleeping, sleeping on the hill.Where is Old Fiddler JonesWho played with life all his ninety years,Braving the sleet with bared breast,Drinking, rioting, thinking neither of wife nor kin,Nor gold, nor love, nor heaven?Lo! He babbles of the fish-frys of long ago,Of the horse-races of long ago at Clary’s Grove,Of what Abe Lincoln saidOne time at Springfield.
O
LLIE
M
C
G
EE
Have you seen walking throught the villageA man with downcast eyes and haggard face?That is my husband who, by secret crueltyNever to be told, robbed me of my youth and my beauty;Till at last, wrinkled and with yellow teeth,And with broken pride and shameful humility,I sank into the grave.But what think you graws at my husband’s heart?
LA COLLINA
Dove sono Elmer, Herman, Bert, Tom e Charley,Il debole di, il forte di braccio, il clown, l'ubriacone, ilcombattente?Tutti, tutti, dormono sulla collina.Uno è morto per febbre,Uno fu bruciato in una miniera,Uno è stato ucciso in una rissa,Uno è morto in una prigioneUno è caduto da un ponte affaticato da moglie e figli Tutti, tutti dormono, dornomo, dormono sulla collina.Dove sono Ella, Kate, Mag, Lizzie ed Edith,Il cuore tenero, l'anima semplice, la rumorosa,l'orgogliosa, l’unica felice? _Tutte, tutte, dormono sulla collina.Una è morto tra i dolori del parto,Una di contrastato amore,Una per causa di un bruto in un bordello,Una di un orgoglio infranto, alla ricerca del desideriodel cuore,Una dopo una vita nelle lontane Londra e ParigiLe è stato portato via un po’ di spazio da Ella e Kate eMag —Tutte, tutte dormono, dornomo, dormono sulla collina.Dove sono Zio Isaac e Zia Emily,E il vecchio Towny Kincaid e Sevigne Houghton,E il sindaco Walker che ha parlatoCon uomini venerabili della rivoluzione? —Tutti, tutti, dormono sulla collina.Hanno riportato i propri figli morti dalla guerra,E figlie che vita aveva schiacciato,E i loro bambini senza padre, piangenti —Tutti, tutti dormono, dornomo, dormono sulla collina.Dove è Old Fiddler JonesChe ha giocato con vita tutti suoi novanta anni,Affrontare il nevischio con scoperta mammella,Bere, insorgere, pensare né l'uno né l'altro di moglie nèceppo,Nè oro, nè amore, nè cielo?Ecco! Lui farnetica di pesce fritto di tempo fa,Di corse di cavalli di tempo fa al Boschetto di Clary,Di quello che Abe Lincoln ha dettoUn tempo a Springfield.
O
LLIE
M
C
G
EE
Avete visto camminare attraverso il villaggioUn uomo con occhi sconfortati e faccia sparuta?Quello è mio marito che, con crudeltà segreta eInaudita, mi ha derubato della mia gioventù e della miabellezza;Fino a che, finalmente, grinzoso e con denti gialli,E senza alcun orgoglio ed vergognosa,L’ho portato nella tomba.Ora, a cosa pensate assomigli il cuore di mio marito?The face of what I was, the face of what he made me!
 
These are driving him to the place where I lie.In death, therefore, I am avenged.
F
LETCHER
M
C
G
EE
She took my strength by minutes,She took my life by hours,She drained me like a fevered moonTha saps the spinning world.The days went by like shadows,The minutes wheeled like stars,She took the pity from my hearth,And made in into smiles.She was a hunk of sculptor’s clay,My secret thoughts were fingers:They flew behind her pensive browAnd lined it deep with painThey set the lips, and sagged the cheecksAnd drooped the eyes with sorrow.My soul had entered in the day,Fighting like seven devils.It was not mine, it was not hers;She held it, but its strugglesModeled a face she hated,And a face I feared to see.I beat the windows, shook the bolts.I hid me in a corner —And then she died and haunted me,And haunted me for life
R
OBERT
F
ULTON
T
ANNER
If a man could bite the giant handThat catches and destroys him,As I was bitten by a ratWhile demonstrating my patent trap,In my hardware store that day.But a man can never avenge himself On the monstrous ogre Life.You enter the room — that’s being born;And then you must live — work out your soul,Aha! The bait that you crave is in view:A woman with money you want to marry,Prestige, place, or power in the world.But there’s work to do and thing to conquer —Oh, yes! The wires that screen the bait.At last you get in — but you hear a step:The ogre, Life, comes into the room,(He was waiting and heard the clang of the spring)To watch you nibble the wondrous cheese,And stare with his burning eyes at you,And scowl and laugh, and mock and curse you,Running up and down in the trap,Until your misery bores him.
S
EREPTA
M
ASON
My life’s blossom micht have bloomed on all sidesSave for a bitter wind which stunted my petalsOn the side of me which you in the village could see.From the dust I lift a voice of protest:My flowering side you never saw!Ye living ones, ye are fools indeedWho do not know the ways of the windLa faccia di quello che ero, la faccia di quello che mi hafatto!Questi lo guidano al luogo dove giaccio.In morte perciò, sono vendicata.
F
LETCHER
M
C
G
EE
R
OBERT
F
ULTON
T
ANNER
S
EREPTA
M
ASON
 
And the unseen forcesThat govern the processes of life.
C
HASE
H
ENRY
In life I was the town drunkard;When I died the priest denied me burialIn holy ground.The which redounded to my good fortune.For the Protestant bought this lot,And burried my body here,Close tho the grave of the banker NicholasAnd his wife Priscilla.Take note, ye prudent and pious souls,Of the cross-currents in lifeWhich bring honor to the dead, who lived in shame.
J
UDGE
S
OMERS
How does it happen, tell me,That I who was most erudite of lawyers,Who knew Blackstone and CokeAlmost by heart, who made the greatest speechThe court.house ever heard, and wroteA brief tha won the praise of Justice Breese —How does it happen, tell me,That I lie here unmarked, forgotten,While Chase Henry, the town drunkhard,Has a marble block, topped by an urn,Wherein Nature, in a mood ironical,Has sown a flowering weed?
R
EUBEN
P
ANTIER
Well, Emily Sparks, your prayers were not wasted,Your love was not all in vain.I owe whatever I was in lifeTo your love that saw me still as good.Dear Emily Sparks, let me tell you the story.I pass the effect of my father and mother,The milliner’s daughter made me troubleAnd out I went in the world,Where I passed throught every peril knownOf wine and women and joy of life.One night, in a room in the Rue de Rivoli,I was drinking wine with a black-eyed cocotte,And the tears swam into my eyes.She thought they were amorous tears and smiledFor thought of her conquest over me.But my soul was three thousand miles away,In the days when you taught me in Spoon River.And just beacuse you no more could love me,Not pray for me, nor write me letters,The eternal silence of you spoke instead.And black-eyed cocotte took the tears for hers,As well at the deceiving kisses I gave her.Somehow, from that hour, I had a new vision —Dear Emily Sparks!
E
MILY
S
PARKS
Where is my boy, my boy —In what far part of the world?The boy I loved best of all in the school? —I, the teacher, the old maid, the virgin hearth,
C
HASE
H
ENRY
J
UDGE
S
OMERS
R
EUBEN
P
ANTIER
E
MILY
S
PARKS

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->