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Bakery Waste Treatment - Tretman otpada u pekarskoj industriji

Bakery Waste Treatment - Tretman otpada u pekarskoj industriji

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AG-Metal Zenica - tretman otpadnih voda:
- Tehnologija tretmana otpadnih voda,
- Prodaja opreme za tretman otpadnih voda,
- Consulting i potpora za projektante i investitore
- Zakoni i propisi iz oblasti tretmana otpadnih voda u zemljama regije
zapadnog Balkana
O tretmanu otpadnih voda više na www.ag-metal.ba

AG-Metal Zenica - wastewater treatment:
- Waste water treatment technology,
- Sale of equipment for wastewater treatment,
- Consulting and support for planners and investors
- Laws and regulations in the field of wastewater treatment in
countries of the region Western Balkans
The treatment of wastewater more on www.ag-metal.ba
AG-Metal Zenica - tretman otpadnih voda:
- Tehnologija tretmana otpadnih voda,
- Prodaja opreme za tretman otpadnih voda,
- Consulting i potpora za projektante i investitore
- Zakoni i propisi iz oblasti tretmana otpadnih voda u zemljama regije
zapadnog Balkana
O tretmanu otpadnih voda više na www.ag-metal.ba

AG-Metal Zenica - wastewater treatment:
- Waste water treatment technology,
- Sale of equipment for wastewater treatment,
- Consulting and support for planners and investors
- Laws and regulations in the field of wastewater treatment in
countries of the region Western Balkans
The treatment of wastewater more on www.ag-metal.ba

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05/05/2013

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\u00a9 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
8
Bakery Waste Treatment
J. Paul Chen, Lei Yang, and Renbi Bai
National University of Singapore, Singapore
Yung-Tse Hung
Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A.
8.1 INTRODUCTION

The bakery industry is one of the world\u2019s major food industries and varies widely in terms of production scale and process. Traditionally, bakery products may be categorized as bread and bread roll products, pastry products (e.g., pies and pasties), and specialty products (e.g., cake, biscuits, donuts, and specialty breads). In March 2003, there were more than 7000 bakery

of bakery businesses are small, having fewer than 100 employees [1].

The bakery industry has had a relatively low growth rate. Annual industry sales were $14.7 billion, $16.6 billion, and $17.7 billion in 1998, 2000, and 2002, respectively; the average weekly unit sales were $9,890, $10,040, and $10,859 during the same periods. Industry sales

while master bakers sell less than 5% [1].
The principles of baking bread have been established for several thousand years. A typical
bakery process is illustrated
8.1.The major equipment includes miller, mixer/

kneading machine, bun and bread former, fermentor, bake ovens, cold stage, and boilers [2 \u2013 4]. The main processes are milling, mixing, fermentation, baking, and storage. Fermentation and baking are normally operated at 408C and 160 \u2013 2608C, respectively. Depending on logistics and the market, the products can be stored at 4 \u2013 208C.

Flour, yeast, salt, water, and oil/fat are the basic ingredients, while bread improver (\ufb02our treatment agents), usually vitamin C (ascorbic acid), and preservatives are included in the commercial bakery production process.

Flour made from wheat (e.g., hard wheats in the United States and Canada) contains a higher protein and gluten content. Yeast is used to introduce anaerobic fermentation, which produces carbon dioxide. Adding a small amount of salt gives the bread \ufb02avor, and can help the fermentation process produce bread with better volume as well as texture. A very small quantity of vegetable oil keeps the products soft and makes the dough easier to pass through the

271
inFigure
operations in the United States (Table 8.1) with more than 220,000 employees. More than 50%
increased 6.5%, only 1.6% ahead of the compounded rate of in\ufb02ation, according towww.bakery-
net.com.Production by large plant bakers contributes more than 80% of the market\u2019s supply,

manufacturing processes. Another important component in production is water, which is used to produce the dough. Good bread should have a certain good percentage of water. Vitamin C, a bread improver, strengthens the dough and helps it rise. Preservatives such as acetic acid are used to ensure the freshness of products and prevent staling. The ratio of \ufb02our to water is normally 10 : 6; while others are of very small amounts [3 \u2013 6].

During the manufacturing process, 40 \u2013 508C hot water mixed with detergents is used to wash the baking plates, molds, and trays. Baking is normally operated on a single eight-hour shift and the production is in the early morning hours.

Table 8.1Bakery Industry Market in the United States
Number of
employees
Number of
businesses
Percentage of
businesses
Total employees
Total sales

Average
employees/
businesses

Unknown
1,638
23.65
N/A
N/A
N/A
1
644
9.30
644
487
1
2\u20134
1,281
18.50
3,583
505.5
3
5\u20139
942
13.60
6,138
753
7
10\u201324
1,117
16.13
16,186
1,208.1
14
25\u201349
501
7.23
17,103
1,578.7
34
50\u201399
287
4.14
18,872
23,51.7
66
100 \u2013 249
305
4.40
45,432
10,820.5
149
250 \u2013 499
130
1.88
43,251
6,909.1
333
500 \u2013 999
70
1.01
45,184
3,255
645
1,000 \u2013 2,499
7
0.10
8,820
N/A
1,260
2,500 \u2013 4,999
2
0.03
7,295
760.2
3,648
10,000 \u2013 14,999
1
0.01
11,077
N/A
11,077
Total/Average
6,925
100.00
223,585
28,628.8
32
Note: data include bread, cake, and related products (US industry code 2051); cookies and crackers (US industry code
2052); frozen bakery products, except bread (US industry code 2053); sales are in $US.
Source: Ref. 1.
Figure 8.1General production process diagram of bakery industry.
272
Chen et al.
\u00a9 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
\u00a9 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
8.2 BAKERY INDUSTRY WASTE SOURCES

The bakery industry is one of the largest water users in Europe and the United States. The daily water consumption in the bakery industry ranges from 10,000 to 300,000 gal/day. More than half of the water is discharged as wastewater. Facing increasing stringent wastewater discharge regulations and cost of pretreatment, more bakery manufacturers have turned to water conservation, clean technology, and pollution prevention in their production processes.

addition, other types of pollution resulting from production are noise pollution and air pollution.
8.2.1 Noise

Noise usually comes from the compressed air and the running machines. It not only disturbs nearby residents, but can harm bakery workers\u2019 hearing. It is reported that sound more than 5 dB(A) above background can be offensive to people. A survey of bakery workers\u2019 exposure showed that the average range is 78\u201385 dB(A), with an average value of 82 dB(A). Ear plugs can help to effectively reduce the suffering. Other noise control measures include the reduction of source noise, use of noise enclosures, reduction of reverberation, and reduction of exposure time [2,7].

8.2.2 AirPollution

The air pollution is due to emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC), odor, milling dust, and refrigerant agent. The VOC can be released in many operational processes including yeast fermentation, drying processes, combustion processes, waste treatment systems, and packaging manufacture. The milling dust comes from the leakage of \ufb02our powder. The refrigerant comes from the emissions leakage of the cooling or refrigeration systems. All of these can cause serious environmental problems. The controlling methods may include treatment of VOC and odor, avoidance of using the refrigerants forbidden by laws, and cyclic use of the refrigerants.

8.2.3 Wastewater

Wastewater in bakeries is primarily generated from cleaning operations including equipment cleaning and \ufb02oor washing. It can be characterized as high loading, \ufb02uctuating \ufb02ow and contains rich oil and grease. Flour, sugar, oil, grease, and yeast are the major components in the waste.

The ratio of water consumed to products is about 10 in common food industry, much higher than that of 5 in the chemical industry and 2 in the paper and textiles industry [3,6]. Normally, half of the water is used in the process, while the remainder is used for washing purposes (e.g., of equipment, \ufb02oor, and containers).

Different products can lead to different amounts of wastewater produced. As shown in Table 8.2,
pastry production can result in much more wastewater than the others. The values of each itemcan

strength than that from bread plants. The pH is in acidic to neutral ranges, while the 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) is from a few hundred to a few thousand mg/L, which is much higher than that from the domestic wastewater. The suspended solids (SS) fromcake plants is very high. Grease from the bakery industry is generally high, which results from the production operations. The waste strength and \ufb02ow rate are very much dependent on the operations, the size of the plants, and the number of workers. Generally speaking, in the plants with products of bread, bun, and roll, which are termed as dry baking, production equipment (e.g., mixing vats and baking pans) are cleaned dry and \ufb02oors are swept before washing down. The wastewater from cleanup

Bakery Waste Treatment
273
As shown inFigure 8.1, almost every operation unit can produce wastes and wastewaters. In
Typical values for wastewater production are summarized inTables 8.2\u20138.4 [3,8,9].
vary signi\ufb01cantly as demonstrated inTable 8.3. The wastewater from cake plants has higher

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