Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
05-26-14 edition

05-26-14 edition

Ratings: (0)|Views: 182|Likes:
05-26-14 edition
05-26-14 edition

More info:

Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on May 26, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/26/2014

pdf

text

original

 
www.smdailyjournal.com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday
May 26,2014
Vol XIII,Edition 242
Family Owned & Operated
 Established: 1949
COLLEGE SHOOTING
STATE/NATION PAGE 7
 
MENLO BEATSSANTA CRUZ
SPORTS PAGE 11
‘X-MEN’TAKES TOPBOX OFFICE SPOT
DATEBOOK PAGE 17
22-YEAR-OLD MAN KILLS 6,SELF IN SANTA BARBARA RAMPAGE
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Carlos City Councilstill has several steps to takebefore potentially striking a landdeal with its elementary school dis-trict for the Charter LearningCenter but at least one councilmansays he doesn’t even think the cityshould make the first move.At Tuesday’s meeting, the coun-cil will be asked to call for the dis-continuance of its North Crestviewsite as park land as required by lawfor that particular zoning change.The city is also required to put thequestion on the ballot but beforethe council can officially call for anelection it must first set a protesthearing. Councilman Matt Grocott said hewill not vote in favor of even hav-ing that hearing because he wantsthe city to keep the Crestview landrather than potentially sell, swapor lease it to the San CarlosElementarySchool District.“You don’ttrample on theminority justbecause you canwith a democrat-ic vote,”Grocott said.“When it wasdesignated apark, there was a promise made if you will to the citizens of SanCarlos that this would stay a parkand people couldrest assured inthat status.”Grocott saidhe’d feel differ-ently if only afew peopleremained thatcared deeplyabout the matterbut that thereare “simply enough people aroundwho remember why it was done andfeel strong enough about it.”Mayor Mark Olbert has been avery vocal proponent of a swapdeal between the city and districtfor land it owns near the TierraLinda Middle School campus. Hestrongly believes that the cityshould move forward with the deci-sion because the two sides are stilltalking. If those discussionsshould falter, then the decisiontohold the protest hearing can lapse,he said.
Council considers protesthearing over land swap
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County is asking a judge to prohibit aMenlo Park man from continuing his litigious waysafter filing dozens of “incoherent” lawsuits over twodecades that the County Counsel’s Office says tie up thecourts and keep attorneys from handling other work.The County Counsel’s Office filed a petition seekingto have Harvey Blight deemed a “vexatious litigant”which would prohibit him from filing any new lawsuitswithout first getting San Mateo County Superior Courtapproval. To do so, a judge must find that Blight eitherbegan or maintained at least five lawsuits for at leasttwo years without a trial or hearing; relitigates mattersafter a case has been decided; repeatedly files frivolousmotions and requests; or has been previously declaredvexatious by a court.
County triesto stop manfrom suing
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
A local Boy Scout makes one last check on the flags he and his fellow scouts planted during Gravesite Decoration Dayon Saturday,May 24.Over 100,000 flags were placed on gravesites at the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Brunoby local scout troops and veterans groups.
PREPARING TO HONOR VETERANS
Proposal for San Carlos,elementary school district exchange could be on November ballot
Matt GrocottMark Olbert
Litigious ways for 20 years costs‘enormous amount of resources’
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The clock is winding down forSequoia Union High SchoolDistrict’s $265 million bondaimed at helping address over-crowding and enrollment growth,as it’s set for a vote in about oneweek.Afacilities task force recom-mended the bond that will gener-ate an approximate $16 per$100,000 tax rate based on cur-rent interest bonds to allow fortwo small schools of 300 to 400students and for six additionalclassrooms to Menlo-AthertonHigh School. Godbe Researchcompleted a voter survey regard-ing a potential measure to sup-port the district’s four compre-hensive high schools and alter-native high school programs.The results showed strong sup-port for a measure, reaching 68.4percent for a simulated June elec-tion. Support was generally con-sistent in the school districtregions that feed into the highschool district. Measure Arequires a 55 percent yes vote onthis June 3 ballot item.The Daily Journal sat down withthose for and against Measure Alast week.The argument in favor states “toensure that our local schools con-tinue offering a challenging, var-ied and top-quality curriculum asstudent enrollment grows,Measure Ais critical now.” It’ssigned by bond co-chair JuliaHorak; Redwood CityCouncilwoman Alicia Aguirre;Belmont City Treasurer JohnViolet; San Carlos resident LindaTeutschel; Deborah Stipek, dean
Sequoia high school bond measure up for vote
$265M measure to tackle overcrowding and enrollment growth,opponents say district is spending irresponsibly
See
SCHOOL
,Page
20
See
LAND
,Page
19
See
LAWSUITS
,Page
19
 
Naked man playing violin at courthouse jailed
PORTLAND, Ore. — Anaked manplaying violin in front of a downtownPortland courthouse Saturday refused towalk to a squad car and had to be carriedby police.Police say they aren’t sure of theman’s identity. He told them his name isMatthew T. Mglej and that he is 25 yearsold.The brand of the violin was unknownon Saturday morning.The man was jailed under the Portlandcity code forbidding indecent exposure.Police say they warned the mannumerous times about his “lack of attire,” but he refused to dress himself orleave public view.City police refrain from enforcing thecode during Portland’s World Naked BikeRide as long as participants keep to thedesignated route. The event draws about8,000 riders each June.
Woman among world’s oldest turning 115 years young
INKSTER, Mich. — ADetroit-areawoman, a member of a select group of the living to have been born in the 19thcentury, is celebrating a birthday onFriday.Her 115th.Jeralean Talley, who was bornMay 23, 1899, went fishing lastyear and still gets around on herown with the help of a walker.The Inkster resident plans to celebratewith family and friends at a local churchon Sunday.On her actual birthday - Friday - Talleyis going to the doctor for a checkup,although she says she doesn’t feel sick.But Talley’s knees occasionallyhurt, her right hand shakes, she has ahard time hearing and her memorycomes and goes.Her answer as to why she has lived solong hasn’t changed over the years.“It’s all in the good Lord’s hands,”Talley told the Detroit Free Press.“There’s nothing I can do about it.”Talley is the oldest-living Americanandthe second-oldest person in theworld, according to a list maintainedby the Gerontology Research Group,which tracks the world’s longest-liv-ing people.The Gerontology Research Group ver-ified Talley’s age using census data.Japan resident Misao Okawa, 116, topsthe list.Talley, whose husband died in 1988,is cared for by a 76-year-old daughterwho lives with her.Five generations of the family are liv-ing in the area, including a great-great-grandson.
Surprise delivery baby raccoons at New York agency
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Someone leftfive well-fed baby raccoons on thedoorstep of the Westchester CountyHealth Department Friday morning, andthe department said that person shouldcall immediately to be assessed for thepossibility of rabies.The month-old raccoons were deliv-ered to the department’s office in MountKisco in a cage with bottles of milk,blankets and toys, the department said.“They appear to have been well caredfor and nurtured, which means that therewas direct contact between these rac-coons and the person or people whowere caring for them,” said Dr. SherlitaAmler, the county health commissioner.“That’s why it’s important that we talkto the individual or individuals who leftthem to determine if they may have beenpotentially exposed to rabies.”Raccoons are among the most com-mon carriers of rabies, a disease that isfatal if not quickly treated.Department spokeswoman CarenHalbfinger said if the raccoons’caretak-er comes forward, he or she will be askedabout any bites or scratches. Officialsalso want to know if the raccoons’mother was sick.That would help determine whether theanimals must be tested for rabies, whichcan only be done by killing them, and if any people need treatment.The raccoons were placed with a cer-tified wildlife rehabilitator who willwatch them for signs of the disease.
FOR THE RECORD2
Monday
May 26,2014
 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA94402
Publisher: Jerry LeeEditorin Chief: Jon Mays
 jerry@smdailyjournal.comjon@smdailyjournal.comsmdailyjournal.comscribd.com/smdailyjournaltwitter.com/smdailyjournalfacebook.com/smdailyjournalPhone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.comEvents:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.comNews:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.comDelivery:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . distribution@smdailyjournal.comCareer: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,emailinformation along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar.If you would like to have an obituary printedmore than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Singer-actorLenny Kravitz is 50.
This Day in HistoryThought for the Day
1954
Explosions rocked the aircraft carrierUSS Bennington off Rhode Island,killing 103 sailors.
“The moment we begin to fear the opinionsof others and hesitate to tell the truth that isin us,and from motives of policy are silent when we should speak,the divine floods of light and life no longer flow into our souls.” 
— Elizabeth Cady Stanton,American feminist (1815-1902)
Actress PamGrier is 65.Helena BonhamCarter is 48.
Birthdays
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
U.S.Coast Guardsman Travis Collier helps Wesley and Tate Gustafson plant flags during Gravesite Decoration Day on Saturday,May 24 at the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno.Over 100,000 flags were placed at the gravesites by local scouttroops and veterans groups.
Memorial day
: Mostly cloudy in themorning then becoming sunny. Highsin the upper 60s. Northwest winds 10 to20 mph.
Monday night
: Mostly clear in theevening then becoming mostly cloudy.Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest winds10 to 20 mph.
Tuesday
: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becomingsunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Tuesday night through Thursday
: Mostly clear. Lowsin the lower 50s. Highs in the lower 60s.
Thursday night
: Mostly clear in the evening then becom-ing mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows in the lower 50s.
Friday
: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming part-ly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the lower 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1521
, Martin Luther was banned by the Edict of Worms(vohrms) because of his religious beliefs and writings.
In 1864
, President Abraham Lincoln signed a measure cre-ating the Montana Territory.
In 1868
, the impeachment trial of President AndrewJohnson ended with his acquittal on the remaining charges.
In 1913
, Actors’Equity Association was organized by agroup of actors at the Pabst Grand Circle Hotel in New York.
In 1938
, the House Un-American Activities Committeewas established by Congress.
In 1940
, the evacuation of more than 338,000 Alliedtroops from Dunkirk, France, began during World War II.
In 1942
, the U.S. War Department formally established theArmed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The Tule (TOO’-lee)Lake Segregation Center for Japanese-American wartimeinternees opened in northern California.
In 1960
, U.N. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge accused theSoviets of hiding a microphone inside a wood carving of theGreat Seal of the United States that had been presented to theU.S. Embassy in Moscow.
In 1969
, the Apollo 10 astronauts returned to Earth after asuccessful eight-day dress rehearsal for the first mannedmoon landing.
In 1972
, President Richard M. Nixon and Soviet leaderLeonid Brezhnev signed the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty inMoscow. (The U.S. withdrew from the treaty in 2002.)
In 1981
, 14 people were killed when a Marine jetcrashed onto the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USSNimitz off Florida.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)JOKER TEASE FAMILYCIRCUSSaturday’sJumbles:Answer:The host’s joke at the cartoonists’awardswas — COMIC RELIEFNow arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, assuggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
byDavid L.Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,one letter to each square,to form four ordinary words.
LADMYDUMONONASCIEPPPUT
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLCAll Rights Reserved.
   C   h  e  c   k  o  u   t   t   h  e  n  e  w ,   f  r  e  e   J   U   S   T   J   U   M   B   L   E  a  p  p
Answerhere:
Lotto
 The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka,No.7,in first place;Lucky Charms,No.12,in secondplace;and Big Ben,No.4,in third place.The racetime was clocked at 1:43.08.
6 7 912 14 21 38 70 15
Meganumber
Ma
 
y 2
 
3 Meg
 
a Milli
 
o
 
ns
 
15 16 28 49 55 18
Powerball
Ma
 
y 24 Po
 
w
 
e
 
r
 
b
 
all
 
12 15 29 33 35
Fa
 
ntasy F
 
ive
 
D
 
a
 
ily th
 
r
 
ee midday
 
70 6 0
Da
 
ily F
 
ou
 
r
 
8 9 8
Da
 
ily th
 
r
 
ee eve
 
n
 
i
 
ng
 
11 13 23 27 29 10
Meganumber
May 24 Su
 
pe
 
r Lott
 
o Pl
 
us
 
Actor Alec McCowen is 89. Sportscaster BrentMusberger is 75. Country musician Gates Nichols(Confederate Railroad) is 70. Rock musician GarryPeterson (Guess Who) is 69. Singer Stevie Nicks is 66.Actor Philip Michael Thomas is 65. Country singer HankWilliams Jr. is 65. Actress Margaret Colin is 57. Countrysinger-songwriter Dave Robbins is 55. Actor DougHutchison is 54. Actress Genie Francis is 52. ComedianBobcat Goldthwait is 52. Rock musician Phillip Rhodes is46. Actor Joseph Fiennes is 44. Singer Joey Kibble (Take6) is 43. Actor-producer-writer Matt Stone is 43.
 
3
Monday
May 26,2014
 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BELMONT
Theft
. Two people reportedly stole $900worth of alcohol from a store on El CaminoReal before 1:20 p.m. Monday, May 19.
Suspicious person
. Aman with no pantson and a blue t-shirt was seen walking underan overpass on El Camino Real before 11:43a.m. Monday, May 19.
Illegal dumping
. Awoman reported find-ing a large box with a dead bird inside dumpedin front of her home on San Juan Boulevardbefore 11:06 a.m. Monday, May 19.
Theft
. Astudent had his guitar stolen at anelementary school on Biddulph Way before9:19 a.m. Monday, May 19.
REDWOODCITY 
Petty theft
. Aperson reported a formerroommate for breaking in their residence,entering possibly through the dog door andstealing electronics on Canyon Road before5:05 p.m. Tuesday, May 20.
Reckless drivers
. Two vehicle were seenracing at Bay Road and Woodside Roadbefore 8:08 p.m. Monday, May 19.Residential burglary. Ahouse was ransackedon Marlin Drive before 5:58 p.m. Monday,May 19.
Disturbance
. Aman in tan shorts wasreported for attempting to sell a puppy on ElCamino Real before 10:36 a.m. Monday,May 19.
Police reports
Life of the party
Aman reported that he was punched inthe face by a coworker at Classic PartyRentals on Rollins Road in Millbraebefore 1:38 p.m. Sunday, May 18.
W
hen World War II broke out, therewere less than 400,000 servicemen ready to defend the UnitedStates. The population of the United Stateswas 132,164,469, however most of thispopulation was on the West and East coasts.The Americans were able to muster up sixfighter planes when the Japanese attackedand they began engaging in dogfights, butwere shot down almost immediately. Most of the airplanes never got off of the ground andwere destroyed by the Japanese. There werenew B-17s arriving from San Diego and theywere immediately attacked. The B-17s werenot armed and most were destroyed almostimmediately. Most of the remaining B-17swe had were destroyed in the Philippines intheir first engagement of the war. Airplanesand manpower were needed immediately ...and just about everything else to fight a warfor which we were not prepared.Luckily, Congresswoman Edith NurseRogers had introduced a bill in Congress inMay of 1941 that allowed creation of an all-volunteer woman’s corps in the Army (TheAir Force was still under the control of theArmy). It wasn’t, however, until May of 1942 that Congress approved a bill creatingthe Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps(WAAC). It wasn’t until that this bill hadtransformed the WAAC to the Women’sArmy Corps (WAC) that the women attainedArmy military status. They enlisted "for theduration and six months.”In 1940, Nancy Harkness Love (a testpilot) and Jacqueline Cochran had made sep-arate proposals to the Army Air Force tobegin a women’s program utilized for ferry-ing aircraft from factories to airports, pulldrones and aerial targets to relieve malepilots from this duty as they were needed atthe front. They were both refused at first but,on Sept. 10, 1942, Love’s proposal wasaccepted. Jackie Cochran was outraged atthis pick and, on Sept. 15, 1942, her planwas also put into motion. It wasn’t untilJuly 1943 that the two plans were mergedand the WASP, or Women Airforce ServicePilots, was formed.Each WASPhad a pilot’s license and hadabout 1,400 flying hours. They were imme-diately retrained in the "Army way” during30 days of orientation and then wereassigned to various ferrying commands. Thewomen were not trained for combat but theircourse of instruction was almost the same asthat used for aviation cadets. The WASPswere considered civil service and did notreceive military benefits. On June 21, 1944,a House bill to give WASPmilitary statuswas narrowly defeated. Immediately theybegan ferrying light aircraft and primarytrainers such as Stearmans and PT-19Fairchilds. They quickly rose to check outlarger aircraft including pursuit planes suchas the P-38 and P-51.Dec. 20, 1944 marked the end of the WASPprogram. At the conclusion of the WASPpro-gram, 915 women pilots were on duty withthe AAF: 620 assigned to the TrainingCommand, 141 to the Air TransportCommand, 133 to the numbered air forces inthe continental United States, 11 to theWeather Wing, nine to the technical com-mands and one to the Troop CarrierCommand. The G.I. Improvement Act of 1977, signed by President Jimmy Carter,gave the WASPcorps full military status fortheir service. In 1984, each WASPwas award-ed the World War II Victory Medal. Those whoserved for more than one year were alsoawarded American Theater Ribbon/AmericanCampaign Metal for their service during thewar. On July 1, 2009, President BarackObama and U.S. Congress awarded the WASPthe Congressional Gold Medal.
Women of the U.S.military
 
 AUTHOR’S COLLECTION
Posters such as this one aimed to encouragewomen’s participation in the war effort.
See
HISTORY
,Page
20

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->