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ENGL 2112, Spring 2006 Syllabus

ENGL 2112, Spring 2006 Syllabus

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World Literature 2
ENGL 2112• 27099 Section 01 • MW 12:30pm-1:45pm • H/SS 118Dr. Gerald Lucas
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102
ENGL 2112, World Literature II, examines national literatures other than those of Britain andAmerica from the Renaissance to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on westernliterature, especially continental, Russian, and Latin American fiction of the 19th and 20thcenturies. World Lit II will explore texts — poems, novels, novellas, plays, and short stories —in their historical and cultural contexts as well as consider how those texts still inform our viewsof ourselves today. Since we have only a limited time in this survey, we will concentrate onboth diversity of texts explored and the detail of that exploration. Texts include those byVoltaire, Pushkin, Dostoyevsky, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Ibsen, Mann, and Borges, among others.
Materials
The Norton Anthology of Western Literature
, Eighth Edition, Volume 2A computer -- any will doA dependable email account that you check dailyAn Internet connection with a Java-enabled Web browser, likeFirefox
Requirements
The following components will be weighed as follows to determine the student's final grade inWorld Literature II:
Response Blogs: 40%
For all of the major works we study in this class, you are required to respond in writing on theclass blog. These responses should be
at least 
350 words. The purpose of these responses is toget you thinking about issues covered in the works that are important to your life and yourcommunity. You should reflect on how these works relate to other works we discuss in class,literature you have read previously, and/or your own daily life.
 All entries should be thoughtful,refer to specific portions of the text on which you're writing, and use the critical vocabulary that we have introduced in class.
If you do any research, be sure that youcorrectly citeboth theprimary and secondary texts. Also, seereader response criticismfor an idea onhow to write about literature. Also, readHow to BlogandHow to Commentbefore beginning your entries. All entries will undergomoderation; only the best will be promoted to the front page of the classblog, while those that are not done carefully will be voted off the site.
Wiki Entries: 20%
On addition to weekly responses on the blog, students will complete
at least 
three writingassignments on thewiki. Instead of interpretive responses like the blog, the wiki's entriesshould be more encyclopedic, presenting factual information, like biography, bibliography,definitions, and the like. If you do any research, be sure that youcorrectly citeboth the primaryand secondary texts. See the syllabus below for specific wiki assignments and their due dates.Also, seeHow to Wikiand theWikipedia Manual of Style. Read theWikipedia tutorialbefore
 
beginning to contribute to LitWiki.
Participation: 20%
Regular class attendance and active participation in classroom discussion are required. Someassignments will occasionally count for participation: quizzes, peer editing, the viewing of afilm, and similar activities. Additional assistance may be obtained from me duringmy officehoursor by appointment. Your participation in group activities and your preparation for class willbe weighed heavily in evaluation: participation, effort, and attitude will count significantly.Since reading is such an important component of this course, you should expect a quiz for everyassigned reading. These quizzes are designed to test factual aspects of the text, notinterpretation or evaluation. Read every text carefully and take reading notes â
” characternames, general plot, important items, etc. â
” and the quizzes will be no problem. Quizzes,other class activities, and homework assignments not explicitly outlined on this document will befactored into your final class participation grade.
Final Exam: 20%
A cumulative final exam will be given; it will be a combination objective and written response.The final exam will test your knowledge of the subject matter (texts, lecture material, andvocabulary), your ability to synthesize this material, and your creativity in going beyond thediscussion and lecture materials. The exam will include vocabulary, identification, andinterpretation. All exam grades will be based upon objective knowledge of the material,thoroughness, depth of insight, precision, and originality.
Schedule
This schedule represents the ideal outline for our study this semester. Yet, like all best-laidplans, we will probably not be able to keep up with our agenda. Please be flexible and try tolook and read ahead whenever possible. We will do our best to stick by this schedule, but wewill inform you verbally whenever there is a change in or an addition to an assignment. Gettingthese updates is solely your responsibility. Therefore, this syllabus is tentative and subject tochange contingent upon the needs of the students and the professor, and dictated by time andother constraints which may affect the course. This syllabus reflects only an overview of theassigned reading and other major course assignments. It does not always indicate other specificclass session assignments or activities.
Week11/9
Class Introduction Reading (for 1/12):Read It!
1/11
Meet in Student Life Building (SLC-252) for computer orientation Reading (for1/18): Molière
Tartuffe
, acts 1-3 (12-49) Blog (for 1/18): Introduce yourself on the blog
Week21/16
No class today for the MLK holiday
1/18
Age of Enlightenment Begin
Tartuffe
Reading (for 1/23): Molière
Tartuffe
, all(12-67) Blog (for 1/23):
Tartuffe
Week31/23
Tartuffe
Blog (for 1/25): Responses
1/25
Tartuffe
Reading (for 1/30):Findand read at least one critical article on
Tartuffe
Writing (for 1/30): Wiki entry on
Tartuffe
Week 1/30
Begin
Tartuffe
film
 
42/1
Finish
Tartuffe
film Reading (for 2/6): Voltaire
Candide
, Chapters 1-19(377-412) Writing (for 2/6): Wiki on
Candide
: begin researching
Candide
andpresent your finding on the Wiki
Week52/6
Candide
Writing (for 2/8): Clean up wiki entries on
Tartuffe
and
Candide
2/8
Intro to Research Wiki work on
Candide
Reading (for 2/13): None: review
Candide
Writing (for 2/13): Finish wiki entries on
Candide
Week62/13
Finish
Candide
Group Presentations Writing (for 2/16): Clean up wiki entries on
Tartuffe
and
Candide
; final submission on 2/16; if you feel you need extracredit, a blog entry on
Candide
would be a good way to achieve it.
2/16
No class today Reading (for 2/27): Goethe
Faust 
, "Prologue in Heaven" through"The City Wall" (522-601) Writing (for 2/27): Blog
or
Wiki on
Faust 
Week72/20
Faust 
Reading (for 2/22): Goethe
Faust 
, complete (522-625) Writing (for 2/22):Blog responses; Wiki additions
2/22
Faust 
Reading and Writing (for 2/27): Begin thewiki assignment on
Faust 
Week82/27
Faust 
continued Reading and Writing (for 3/1): Continue thewiki assignment on
Faust 
3/1
Finish
Faust 
Reading (for 3/13): Dostoyevsky
Notes from Underground 
, Part I(1255-1276) Writing (for 3/13): Wiki or Blog on Dostoyevsky: do research andbe sure to include
at least 
two critical articles in your blogs and wikis. SpringBreak is next week, so you have time; the reading is short so you canconcentrate on your writing assignments.
Week93/13
NfU 
Writing (for 3/15): Response on
NfU 
3/15
NfU 
continued Reading (for 3/20): Dostoyevsky
Notes from Underground 
, Part II(1277-1327) Writing (for 3/20): Wiki and Blog on Dostoyevsky: do research andbe sure to include
at least 
two critical articles in your blogs and wikis. SpringBreak is next week, so you have time; the reading is short so you canconcentrate on your writing assignments.
Week103/20
NfU 
continued Writing (for 3/22): Response on
NfU 
, part II
3/22
NfU 
continued Reading (for 3/27): Symbolist poets (1538-1582) Group 1:Baudelaire Group 2: Mallarmé Group 3: Verlaine Group 4: Rimbaud Writing(for 3/27): Choose a poem from your assigned poet and do a close reading of itfor a blog entry. Be ready to discuss what you wrote in class next week. Youmight also want to supplement your blog entry with something on the wiki:perhaps something about your poet's background and historical period.
Week113/27
Symbolist poets
Reading for everyone (3/29)
:Baudelaire: "To the Reader"; "Her Hair"; "The Windows"Mallarmé: "The Afternoon of a Faun"; "The Tomb of Edgar Poe"; "Saint"Verlaine: "Autumn Song"; "Wooden Horses"Rimbaud: "A Season in Hell"; "Drunken Boat"
Group Assignment (due 3/29)
: Team teaching of your poet; choose two tofour poems that epitomize the writer's work (see editor's intros forsuggestions); be able to explain why they are good examples; be able tell whatthe literal action is in the poem; know major themes, concerns, images, etc.;be able to provide a close reading of each, to help others; come up withstudy/discussion questions that help others interpret and understand yourpoems; be sure to submit your reading list to me by the end of class onMonday, 3/27
3/29
Symbolist poets continued Reading (for 4/3): Modernist Poets Group 1: Cavafy(1714-1722) Group 2: Yeats (1723-1735) Group 3: Rilke (1870-1876) Group 4:

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