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Issues in Trade and Protectionism

Issues in Trade and Protectionism

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There is widespread concern that the United States and the rest of the world are descending into a round of protectionism and a trade war reminiscent of what the world experienced in the Great Depression. Such concerns are both overblown and misplaced. In the short term, the main concern in the United States and rest of the world should be to promote an increase in demand through whatever means necessary. For the longer term, there has been an excessive fixation on protection for merchandise trade. Other areas, most notably alternative intellectual property regimes and freer trade in highly paid professional services, offer much larger potential gains than further reductions in barriers to trade in goods.
There is widespread concern that the United States and the rest of the world are descending into a round of protectionism and a trade war reminiscent of what the world experienced in the Great Depression. Such concerns are both overblown and misplaced. In the short term, the main concern in the United States and rest of the world should be to promote an increase in demand through whatever means necessary. For the longer term, there has been an excessive fixation on protection for merchandise trade. Other areas, most notably alternative intellectual property regimes and freer trade in highly paid professional services, offer much larger potential gains than further reductions in barriers to trade in goods.

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Published by: Center for Economic and Policy Research on Nov 17, 2009
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*This report is a revised version of a presentation given at the World Knowledge Forum in Seoul, Koreaon October 14, 2009.
Issues in Trade and Protectionism
 
Dean Baker
November 2009*
Center for Economic and Policy Research
1611 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 400Washington, D.C. 20009202-293-5380www.cepr.net
 
 
CEPR Issues in Trade and Protectionism
i
 
Contents
Introduction........................................................................................................................................................1
 
 The Short Term Picture....................................................................................................................................1
 
 The Longer Term Trade Picture......................................................................................................................4
 
Intellectual Property......................................................................................................................................4
 
Professional Barriers.....................................................................................................................................7
 
 About the Author
Dean Baker is an economist and Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C.
 
 
CEPR Issues in Trade and Protectionism
1
 
Introduction
 There is widespread concern that the United States and the rest of the world are descending into around of protectionism and a trade war reminiscent of what the world experienced in the GreatDepression. Such concerns are both overblown and misplaced. In the short term, the main concernin the United States and rest of the world should be to promote an increase in demand through whatever means necessary. For the longer term, there has been an excessive fixation on protectionfor merchandise trade. Other areas, most notably alternative intellectual property regimes and freertrade in highly paid professional services, offer much larger potential gains than further reductions inbarriers to trade in goods.
The Short Term Picture
Last February, the United States Congress passed a $787 billion stimulus package designed to helpboost the economy out of recession. This package contained a “Buy American” provision thatapplied to steel and some other manufactured goods that might be purchased as part of this stimuluspackage. This Buy American provision raised concerns about a new wave of protectionism aroundthe world. In fact, judging by the reaction of some in the media, we are already in the midst of a full-fledged trade war as a result of this provision of the stimulus bill. However, it is easy to show thatthe reaction to this Buy American provision was hugely disproportionate to its economic impact.Realistically, U.S. trading partners should have been very happy to have the stimulus package, even with its Buy American provision. The size of the stimulus package was $787 billion, the bulk of which involves tax cuts or spending that will take place in 2009 and 2010. If, for simplicity, we assign a multiplier of 1 to this package(the spending would mostly come with a higher multiplier, while the tax cuts a somewhat lowermultiplier), then it will increase GDP by $787 billion over the period in which the stimulus is inplace. If we assume a marginal propensity to import in the United States of 0.2, then an increase inGDP of $787 billion implies an increase in imports of just under $160 billion. The Buy American provision applied to a relatively small portion of the stimulus package. Thelargest components were tax cuts and aid to state and local governments so that they would not haveto make budget cutbacks in response to a loss of tax revenues. The infrastructure portion of theprogram – together with the other items covered by the Buy American provision – accounts for lessthan $80 billion of the stimulus.However, even this figure hugely overstates the impact of the provision. Much of the spending inthese categories is for labor. Certainly this is true in the case of infrastructure spending. And muchof the materials used for infrastructure are items like asphalt and concrete, which have high weightper unit of value, and therefore are unlikely to have been imported even without the Buy Americanprovision. The amount of goods that could plausibly be excluded as a result of this provision isprobably in the neighborhood of 10 percent of the categories of the stimulus subject to theprovision. In other words, the Buy American provision may exclude somewhere around $7-$8billion of imports, as shown in
Figure 1
.

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