Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Landscape Plants That Attract Birds

Landscape Plants That Attract Birds

Ratings: (0)|Views: 79 |Likes:
Published by Daisy

More info:

Published by: Daisy on Nov 17, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/27/2010

pdf

text

original

 
G1609
LANDSCAPE PLANTS THATLANDSCAPE PLANTS THAT
ATTRACT BIRDSATTRACT BIRDS
SCOTT R. CRAVEN AND ROBERT ELLARSON
"Hummingbird" by Owen J. Gromme, courtesy of Wild Wing Gallery, Lake City, Minn.
 
T H A T A T T R A C T B I R D S / 1
I
nterest in songbirds grows every year. Bird feedingis perhaps the most popular wildlife-related activityin the country. Most of us enjoy seeing and hearingbirds, and birdwatching is a fascinating year-roundhobby for many people. A 1980 report on noncon-sumptive uses of wildlife conducted by the U.S. Fishand Wildlife Service revealed that 33 percent of
Americans–about 56 million people–took special in-
terest in wildlife near their homes. About 6 percentmaintained natural areas for wildlife and 7.3 percent– about 12.5 million–maintained plantings for wildlife, thesubject of this bulletin. In all cases, people wereprimarily interested in songbirds.The bright flashes of color, the distinctive songs, the lifebirds add to the landscape, and the opportunity youhave to observe their interesting habits make spendingtime and effort to encourage their presence well worth
while.
bleak and snowy scene. Landscape plants can help at-tract birds throughout the year Winter bird feeders alsoenhance your yard’s attractiveness.Landscape plantings make home grounds attractive tobirds in several ways. Plants furnish year-round shelterand protection from predators. They provide safenesting sites and rearing places for young birds. And,they supply food in the form of fruit, seeds, and nectarBirds also find plantings convenient and attractiveplaces to hunt for insects. Landscape plantings canbenefit birds and still follow basic principles of land-scape design. Other benefits include fall foliage color,spring flowers, privacy, and edible fruits and nuts.
LIVING REQUIREMENTS
If you give some thought to landscape planning andDifferent birds require different habitats. For example,planting your home grounds, you can greatly increasethe flicker, northern (Baltimore) oriole, and chippingthe chance that birds will nest in your yard. A delightfulsparrow need just a few large trees to make an areathing about birds is the seemingly capricious way theysuitable for them. Some, like the red-eyed vireo, woodselect homesites. You can never predict exactly where athrush, and wood pewee need a dense stand of manybird will build its nest, so it’s a pleasure when theylarge trees. Others, like the catbird, are satisfied withchoose your yard.
shrubs alone.
About 330 species of birds migrate through or stay inWisconsin. Of these, 12 or 15 songbird species com-monly nest in residential areas of cities and towns, and16 or 17 more build nests around rural homesites,Besides these nesting birds, some migrant birds maystop for a day or two during their migration if they findyour yard attractive. Don’t forget about birds that stayover the winter. They add life and color to an otherwiseA few birds demand open spaces without trees and lit-tle or no shrubby vegetation. The house wren, treeswallow, robin, phoebe, and others nest in holes orcavities in trees, in nest boxes, or on platforms put upfor them. By creating the proper habitat, you can makevirtually any yard or garden attractive to some kind ofsongbird. Generally, the larger and more diverse youryard, the more birds and more different birds you will
attract.
 
2 / L A N D S C A P EP L A N T S
 WISCONSIN BIRDS
Based on bird counts from several Wisconsin cities, thefollowing table shows the 15 most abundant breedingsongbirds and their habitat and nesting preferences.Your location in Wisconsin, of course, influences thepresence of some of these species.House sparrows and starlings are almost always pres-ent: these two immigrants generally need no en-couragement. In fact, try to discourage their presenceto prevent their competing with more desirable nativespecies. Grackles and crows are frequently attracted tolarge evergreens and also aren’t always welcome.The purple martin, screech owl, and chimney swift areoften present, but they need special nesting sites. Seepublication “G2091, Shelves, Houses and Feeders forBirds and Squirrels” for more information.Hummingbirds have special needs. The ruby-throatedhummingbird is the only one that lives in Wisconsin.These tiny, iridescent, incredibly fast birds are a favoritewith backyard wildlife enthusiasts. There are two ways toattract them. Hummingbird feeders filled with an instant“nectar” mix or a sugar-water solution (4 parts water to1 part sugar) attract them. So too, do a wide variety oforange, yellow and especially red, tubular flowers thathummingbirds favor. Flowers such as scarlet petunia,bee balm, scarlet salvia, scarlet runner beans, cardinalflower, and scarlet morning glory may be incorporatedinto flower beds. Shrubs such as trumpet honeysuckle,weigela, or trumpet creeper vine also attract thesebirds. Other plants are available and many seedcatalogs and nurseries note the relative attractiveness oftheir plants to hummingbirds.Rural and suburban dwellers might expect to attract anyof the above mentioned birds if suitable habitat isavailable in their gardens or on their grounds. In addi-tion, the following birds might be expected in the lesspopulous areas.
GENERAL HABITAT & NESTING PREFERENCE – Most Abundant Species
SpeciesDense Trees
Few Trees
ShrubsNest BoxNest Platform
Robin
X XX
Grackle
X
House wren
X X
Mourning dove
X X
Blue jay
X XX
CatbirdNorthern oriole
XXXXXXXXX
X
X
X
x
x
x
X
Chipping sparrow
Flicker
Cardinal
Rose-breasted grosbeakGoldfinchCedar waxwingWhite-breasted nuthatchScarlet tanager

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->