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Pragmatus AV, LLC v. Yahoo! Inc., C.A. No. 11-902-LPS-CJB (D. Del. May 15, 2014)

Pragmatus AV, LLC v. Yahoo! Inc., C.A. No. 11-902-LPS-CJB (D. Del. May 15, 2014)

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10/11/2014

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IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF DELAWARE
PRAGMATUS AV, LLC, Plaintiff,
v
YAHOO INC., Defendant. Civil Action No. 11-902-LPS-CJB
REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION
In this action filed by Plaintiff Pragmatus AV, LLC ("Pragmatus"
or Plaintiff')
against Defendant Yahoo Inc. ("Yahoo " or "Defendant"), Plaintiff alleges that Yahoo directly and indirectly infringes five
of
Plaintiffs
patents (the "Asserted Patents"
or
the "patents-in-suit"). Presently before the Court is the matter
of
claim construction. The Court recommends that the District Court adopt the constructions as set forth below.
I BACKGROUND
A The Parties
Plaintiff is a Virginia limited liability company with its principal place
of
business in Alexandria, Virginia. (D.I. 160 at
i
1
t
is the owner
of
the patents-in-suit.
Id.
at
i
6-11) Defendant is a Delaware corporation with its principal place
of
business
in
Sunnyvale, California.
Id.
at
i
2)
n
the course
of
its business, Defendant provides the Yahoo Messenger product.
See, e.g.,
id
at
i
13)
B The Asserted Patents
Each
of
the Asserted Patents is based on U.S. Appl. No. 08/131,523, which is now U.S.
1
 
Patent No. 5,689,641, and all
of
the Asserted Patents share a common specification. The Asserted Patents are: United States Patent No. 6,237,025 ( the '025 patent ), entitled Multimedia Collaboration System ; United States Patent No. 6,351,762 ( the '762 patent ), entitled Method and System
For
Log-in-Based Video and Multimedia Calls ; United States Patent No. 5,854,893 ( the '893 patent ), entitled System
For
Teleconferencing In Which Collaboration Types and Participants
y
Names
Or
Icons Are Selected
y
A Participant
Of
The Teleconference ; United States Patent No. 7, 185,054 ( the '054 patent ), entitled Participant Display and Selection In Video Conference Calls ; and United States Patent No. 5,896,500 ( the '500 patent ), entitled System
For
Call Request Which Results In First and Second Call Handle Defining Call State Consisting
Of
Active Or Hold
For
Its Respective AV Device. (D.I. 63, exs. 1-5) The Asserted Patents relate to the field
of
distributed multimedia collaboration. Specifically, the Asserted Patents disclose systems and methods for utilizing hardware, software and communications technologies to produce a multimedia collaboration system that greatly facilitates distributed collaboration, in part
by
replicating the benefits
of
face-to-face collaboration.
See, e.g.,
'025 patent, col. 4:49-54)
C Procedural Posture
On October 4, 2011, Pragmatus commenced this action. (D.I. 1)
On
April 6, 2012, this matter was referred to the Court
by
Judge Leonard P. Stark to hear and resolve all pretrial matters, up to and including the resolution
of
case-dispositive motions. (D.I. 32) On November 13, 2012, the parties filed a Joint Claim Construction Chart in which they identified sixteen disputed terms
or
term sets. (D.I. 63) The parties filed simultaneous opening 2
 
and responsive claim construction briefs
on November
29, 2012 and
December
21, 2012, respectively. (D.I. 71, 72, 82, 84)
The
Court
held
a
Markman
hearing
on
January 10, 2013. (D.I. 188, hereinafter Tr. )
On
January 24, 2013,
the
parties submitted a supplemental
joint
letter regarding the term call handle. (D.I. 94)
II STANDARD OF REVIEW
t
is well-understood that [a] claim
in
a patent provides the metes and bounds
of
the right which
the
patent confers
on
the patentee to exclude others from making, using,
or
selling the protected invention.
Corning Glass Works
v
Sumitomo Elec. US.A., Inc.,
868
F.2d
1251, 1257 (Fed. Cir. 1989).
The
proper
construction
of
claim terms is a question
oflaw
for
the
Court.
Markman
v
Westview Instruments, Inc.,
52 F.3d 967,
979
(Fed. Cir. 1995),
ajf d,
517 U.S. 370 (1996). The Court should generally give claim terms their
'ordinary and
customary
meaning[,] ' which
is the meaning that the term[s]
would
have to a
person
of
ordinary skill in
the
art
in
question at
the time
of
the invention, i.e., as
of
the
effective filing date
of
the
patent
application.
Phillipsv. AWHCorp.,
415F.3d1303,
1312-13 (Fed. Cir. 2005) (citations omitted). However,
when
determining
the
ordinary
meaning
of
claim terms,
the
Court should
not
extract and isolate those terms from
the
context
of
the patent,
but
rather should endeavor to reflect their
meaning
to
the
ordinary artisan after reading the entire patent.
Id
at 1321.
To
that end,
the
Court should
look
first and foremost to
the
language
of
the claims, because [i]t is a bedrock principle
of
patent
law
that the claims
of
a patent define the invention to
which
the patentee is entitled the right to exclude.
Phillips,
415 F .3d at 1312 (internal quotation marks and citations omitted).
For
example,
the
context
in
which
a term is
used
in
a claim may be highly instructive.
Id
at 1314. In addition, [o]ther claims
of
the patent
in
3

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