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Information Flows Faster than Water: Lessons from a mixed methods evaluation of Oxfam's Community-based Disaster Risk Management and Livelihoods Programme in Pakistan

Information Flows Faster than Water: Lessons from a mixed methods evaluation of Oxfam's Community-based Disaster Risk Management and Livelihoods Programme in Pakistan

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Published by: Oxfam on May 27, 2014
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08/11/2015

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OXFAM RESEARCH REPORT MAY 2014
Oxfam Research Reports
 are written to share research results, to contribute to public debate and to invite feedback on development and humanitarian policy and practice. They do not necessarily reflect Oxfam policy positions. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Oxfam. 
www.oxfam.org
 
INFORMATION FLOWS FASTER THAN WATER
 A District Flood Preparedness Plan, Muzaffargarh District, Punjab Province. Photo: Jane Beesley/Oxfam, September 2010
Lessons from a mixed methods evaluation of Oxfam's Community-based Disaster Risk Management and Livelihoods Programme in Pakistan 
MARTIN WALSH & RICARDO FUENTES-NIEVA
RESEARCH TEAM, OXFAM GB
 
 2 Information Flows Faster Than Water
In 2010 Pakistan suffered the worst floods in the country’s history. As well as being heavily involved in the humanitarian response to this disaster, Oxfam already had climate change adaptation and risk reduction projects on the ground. One of these was the Community-based Disaster Risk Management and Livelihoods (CBDRML) Programme, operated by partner organizations in four districts of Pakistan. A subsequent quantitative evaluation of the programme in two districts found strong evidence that participating households were better prepared to manage flood-related risk than those outside the programme, and so lost fewer assets during the 2010 floods. This was a very positive outcome, tempered only by the finding that households had not diversified their livelihoods to the extent that was expected.  A qualitative follow-up study was commissioned in early 2013 to provide a deeper understanding of these results, and its findings are presented here. It shows that by empowering people to access information and act quickly in response to the floods, the two partner organizations were able to deliver quick wins to the communities they were working with, reducing their vulnerability. Building adaptive capacity in the long term, however, poses much greater challenges for community-based participatory programmes of this kind. This study supports the conclusion that resilience and empowerment are inextricably intertwined, and that achieving both requires concerted effort at different levels. Research is an important part of this, and should include mixed methods studies like the one reported here to help determine which approaches are most likely to be effective in building community resilience.

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