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Christianity in the Home.

Christianity in the Home.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE

BY D. W. Hastings.

You will probably find nothing new in
this sermon but something practical, some-
that you may use on Monday as well as on
Sunday. We shall talk of that which concerns
each of us and each reader is invited to take
the sermon as personal and apply it to self.

BY D. W. Hastings.

You will probably find nothing new in
this sermon but something practical, some-
that you may use on Monday as well as on
Sunday. We shall talk of that which concerns
each of us and each reader is invited to take
the sermon as personal and apply it to self.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on May 29, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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CHRISTIAITY I THE HOME. BY D. W. Hastings. You will probably find nothing new in this sermon but something practical, some- that you may use on Monday as well as on Sunday. We shall talk of that which concerns each of us and each reader is invited to take the sermon as personal and apply it to self. A long time ago before there was any church or state, God founded the home. ot only is the home the oldest social institution, but it is one of mighty importance. - We may praise our Bible Schools, our Young People's Societies, our social organizations, our educa- tional institutions, our national government, but what would be the fate of any or all if the home were broken down? The neighborhood is simply the sum, good or evil, of the homes which constitute it. The church prospers or languishes as the home-life is pure, strong, Christlike or the opposite. The nation can never rise above its homes. As goes the home so goes society, the church, the nation. We should make more of the home. o other institution, however good, should be al- lowed to oppose God's purpose in founding the home. Without entering into any discus- BY IOWA WRITERS. 287 sion of the merits or demerits of lodges, clubs, circles and similar organiz^ations, we are safe in saying that whenever these rob the home of its just dues they are positively evil. The
 
man who spends his evenings in lodge and club need not wonder that his boys drift into bad company and disgrace themselves from lack of fatherly companionship and example. The woman whointrusts her home and children to servants while she gives her attention to clubs and societies, however good, need not wonder that she loses her influence over her own children. And the man and woman who, rather than forego the pleasures of society, rather than obey God's law and become parents, destroy their own unborn children; these are murderers and should expect the fate of mur- derers except they repent. Listen to a plain statement of truth: The willful, illegal taking of human life is murder, whether that life be  just conceived or f ullv developed. I offer no apology for stating the truth. Men and wo- men in all ranks of society, many of them en- rolled as church members, are mocking mar- riage and the home. Shining in society, do- ing church work, growing enthusiastic over reforms can never cleanse the blackened souls of those who practice this monstrous crime. Even church work may be misunderstood and be so abused as to hinder home duties. The woman who belongs so fully to church so- cieties, and whose time is therebv so taken 288 DOCTRIE AD LIFE that her beds go unmade, her house unswept, and her children unwashed, has need of Christian training. The church that is so poorly taught, or so irreligious, that the ex- penses must be raised by the sisters at the expense of their home-life is a robber-church.
 
We need social pleasures: we profit by meeting each other in legitimate social func- tions: we should give much time and toil to the church, but there are many times when we can best serve societj' and the church at home. Home is a splendid place for the culti- vation! of our social nature and for the devel- opment of Christian character. Let us maKe more of our homes and our homes will make more of us. Many who are zealous for Christ, anxious to lead souls to Him. anxious to enlighten and uplift the neg- lected, could find a splendid field for effort beneath their own roofs or in their own back yards. I believe in active church work: there is great need of fuller consecration to the work of uplifting and saving the lost all around us. What I urge is that the home receive its rightful attention, that those nearest us be not neglected. I wish to say a word for those women who are prettv generally ignored or only pitied: women whose voices are not often, perhaps never heard in great conventions: whose names are seldom if ever seen in print: yet women whose names are in the Book of Life; BY IOWA WRITERS. 289 the home-keepers, whose toil, caring for the home and the little ones, precludes their en-  joying the great meetings, or speaking from the platform or through the press. These women are seldom mentioned. The}' are so "common," ''Any one can keep house and care

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