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New Harmonies LESSON 3

New Harmonies LESSON 3

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Published by Amy Adams

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Published by: Amy Adams on Nov 19, 2009
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LESSON 3
LYRICS AND MOTION IN ACTION!
Lesson Objectives (suggested grade levels: 4-8)
In this lesson, students will focus on identifying lyrics and rhythms found inAmerican roots music. They will also compare the music featured in theexhibition to the music they listen to, and ultimately will be able to write theirown stanza. Music is a form of personal expression, and they will be able toexperience it.
National Standards:
Social Studies:
Culture
: Social studies programs should include experiences that providefor the study of culture and cultural diversity.
Time, Continuity, & Change:
Social Studies programs should includeexperiences that provide for the study of the ways human beings viewthemselves in and over time.
People, Places & Environments
: Social studies programs should includeexperiences that provide for the study of people, place, andenvironments.
English Language Arts:
Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideasand questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, andsynthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-printtexts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways thatsuit their purpose and audience.Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g.libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesizeinformation and to create and communicate knowledge.Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity inlanguage use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups,geographic regions, and social roles.
CONTENTSPre-visit
Worksheet 1:
Is Music Part of Your Life?
 
Visit
Worksheet 2:
Explore the Exhibition: Look, Listen, and Move!
 
Post-visit
1
 
 
LESSON 3
LYRICS AND MOTION IN ACTION!
Activity 1:
I’ve Got the Blues
 Activity 2:
Music Bee
 
Materials
Computer with internet access
2
 
 
LESSON 3
LYRICS AND MOTION IN ACTION!
Lesson 3: Teacher Instructions and Background
What is meaningful in your life? Musicians reflect on their lives and the worldaround them through their songs. Gospel artists are inspired to sing about theirreligious faith and spirituality. Blues songs feature lyrics about the realities of poverty, racism, and broken relationships. Folk musicians have long beeninspired to speak out on social and political causes in their music. All rootsmusicians challenge and celebrate America through their songs.Each lesson is intended to prepare students for a visit to
New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Musi
and to follow up on that visit after yourreturn to the classroom.The
Pre-visit
worksheet is designed to encourage students to think about theirown personal interests in music. The
Visit
activities invite the students tocollect information and apply their new-found knowledge in the classroom. The
Post-visit
activities draw on their own heritage and the information learnedduring their museum visit. All of these activities can be completed in groups orby individual students.
Pre-visit
Several days before visiting the exhibit, make copies of Worksheet 1:
Is MusicPart of Your Life?
for all of the students. Distribute the worksheet a few daysbefore the visit so that students have enough time to consider their personalmusical interests.
Visit
Before going to the exhibit, copy Worksheet 2:
Explore the Exhibition: Look,Listen, and Move!
for each student in the class. Hand out the page to eachstudent just before the students do the activity. (Preferably, this will occurafter any guided tours or as part of the scavenger hunt.) Make sure eachstudent has a pencil (not pen) to write down the information. (Pens makepermanent marks, and museums generally prefer the use of pencils in theirexhibits.) You may wish to collect the papers from the students before leavingthe exhibition.
Post-visit
After returning from your visit, targeted classroom activities will help thestudents apply information learned during the exhibition visit. These activitiesinvolve higher-level thinking skills such as interpretation, synthesis, thinkinghypothetically, and/or expressing judgment.
3

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