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Scorsese by Ebert

Scorsese by Ebert

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Published by University of Chicago Press an imprint of UChicagoPress

Roger Ebert wrote the first film review that director Martin Scorsese ever received—for 1967’s I Call First, later renamed Who’s That Knocking at My Door—creating a lasting bond that made him one of Scorsese’s most appreciative and perceptive commentators. Scorsese by Ebert offers the first record of America’s most respected film critic’s engagement with the works of America’s greatest living director, chronicling every single feature film in Scorsese’s considerable oeuvre, from his aforementioned debut to his 2008 release, the Rolling Stones documentary Shine a Light.

In the course of eleven interviews done over almost forty years, the book also includes Scorsese’s own insights on both his accomplishments and disappointments. Ebert has also written and included six new reconsiderations of the director’s less commented upon films, as well as a substantial introduction that provides a framework for understanding both Scorsese and his profound impact on American cinema.

"Given their career-long back-and-forth, this collection makes perfect sense. . . . In these reconsiderations, Ebert invites us into his thought processes, letting us see not just what he thinks, but how he forms his opinions. Ebert’s insights into Scorsese are terrific, but this book offers the bonus of further insights into Ebert himself."—Time Out Chicago

"Ebert, film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, is an unabashed fan of Scorsese, whom he considers ‘the most gifted director of his generation.’ . . . Of special note are interviews with Scorsese over a 25-year period, in which the director candidly discusses his body of work."—Publishers Weekly

Roger Ebert wrote the first film review that director Martin Scorsese ever received—for 1967’s I Call First, later renamed Who’s That Knocking at My Door—creating a lasting bond that made him one of Scorsese’s most appreciative and perceptive commentators. Scorsese by Ebert offers the first record of America’s most respected film critic’s engagement with the works of America’s greatest living director, chronicling every single feature film in Scorsese’s considerable oeuvre, from his aforementioned debut to his 2008 release, the Rolling Stones documentary Shine a Light.

In the course of eleven interviews done over almost forty years, the book also includes Scorsese’s own insights on both his accomplishments and disappointments. Ebert has also written and included six new reconsiderations of the director’s less commented upon films, as well as a substantial introduction that provides a framework for understanding both Scorsese and his profound impact on American cinema.

"Given their career-long back-and-forth, this collection makes perfect sense. . . . In these reconsiderations, Ebert invites us into his thought processes, letting us see not just what he thinks, but how he forms his opinions. Ebert’s insights into Scorsese are terrific, but this book offers the bonus of further insights into Ebert himself."—Time Out Chicago

"Ebert, film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, is an unabashed fan of Scorsese, whom he considers ‘the most gifted director of his generation.’ . . . Of special note are interviews with Scorsese over a 25-year period, in which the director candidly discusses his body of work."—Publishers Weekly

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Publish date: May 15, 2009
Added to Scribd: Nov 19, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780226182049
List Price: $16.00

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12/20/2014

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9780226182049

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squeakjones reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Scorsese at first seems like a compilation of Roger Ebert's various interviews and reviews concerning the man and his work. And it is that: if you're simply looking for a collection of reviews of Scorsese's movies, from debut WHO'S THAT KNOCKING AT YOUR DOOR to last year's SHINE A LIGHT documentary on the Rolling Stones, well, I guess this book will have served its purpose.But that's not all. It's also a close examination of the best that movies can aspire to, and what goes into achieving that. It's about the childhood memories that are burned so deeply into our souls that we have have no choice but to leave the faintest of traces on all that we touch. It's a celebration, and for Ebert it's a chance to explore the sparks to see just how it is that they ignite his soul.But it is also, perhaps first and foremost, about the movies.The title says it all: this isn't an objective look at Martin Scorsese the Film Director. This is a very personal, subjective book about how Marty, both in person and in his films, has affected Roger over the course of his professional life. He constantly refers to Scorsese as the greatest living American Director, and while I do agree with that statement, the beauty of the book is that it doesn't feel at all like its job is to convince me - it just wants me to know how and why they happen to work for Ebert. In the process of this, however, you get a thorough examination of each Scorsese's films, including in some instances reconsiderations that act as a counterpoint to Ebert original reviews (all of which are included) as well as a series of longer essays compiled under the heading of "Masterpieces" which are culled from Ebert's excellent Great Movies series.What Ebert has done is to bring the director's films to life in a way that makes watching them somehow more vibrant, more alive. Which is something I'll definitely be doing sooner rather than later.
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