Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
WFP Kenya’s Transitional Cash Transfers to Schools (TCTS): A Cash-Based Home Grown School Meals Programme

WFP Kenya’s Transitional Cash Transfers to Schools (TCTS): A Cash-Based Home Grown School Meals Programme

Ratings: (0)|Views: 74|Likes:
Published by Jeffrey Marzilli
The school meals programme is WFP’s oldest programme in Kenya. The transitional cash transfers to schools (TCTS) pilot is intended to facilitate a smooth transition of this important safety net to a government-led, community-owned programme. The pilot is ongoing and continues to generate new learning; New ways are being suggested for improving linkages with local producers and establishing controls and systems that can be sustained over time. The goal is to continue and deepen the partnership with the Ministry of Education to establish the Government’s home grown school meals programme as a sustainable national safety net of which Kenyans are proud.
The school meals programme is WFP’s oldest programme in Kenya. The transitional cash transfers to schools (TCTS) pilot is intended to facilitate a smooth transition of this important safety net to a government-led, community-owned programme. The pilot is ongoing and continues to generate new learning; New ways are being suggested for improving linkages with local producers and establishing controls and systems that can be sustained over time. The goal is to continue and deepen the partnership with the Ministry of Education to establish the Government’s home grown school meals programme as a sustainable national safety net of which Kenyans are proud.

More info:

Published by: Jeffrey Marzilli on Jun 02, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/25/2014

pdf

text

original

 
WFP Kenya’s Transional Cash Transfers to Schools (TCTS)
 
A Cash
-
Based Home Grown School Meals Programme
 
Who is the TCTS pilot for?
 
37,000 primary school children; 99 schools (including 45 very remote schools, one of which is a mobile school for nomadic pastoralists); and 32 grain traders.
 
Where is it happening?
 
Isiolo County, north eastern, Kenya (100% coverage of primary schools in the county). The map above shows where WFP in
-
kind assistance is being used for school meals; where the pilot cash to schools is being implemented; and where WFP has already handed over schools to the Government’s home grown school meals programme (HGSMP).
 
East and Central Africa
 
OMN|
 
Knowledge Series
 
Regional Bureau for
 
 
This paper is part of a knowledge sharing series to inform beer programming and communicate results.
 
At the centre of WFP’s approach to school feeding is an intenon to shi ownership to naonal governments, while improving quality, coverage and sustainability. Linking school feeding programmes to local agricultural producon is a crical element in supporng sustainable transions, and one that can create wider economic outcomes for small
-
scale producers and traders. In Kenya, WFP has been working with the Government to handover its school meals programme and to support their transion to a cash
-
based home grown model. The Government’s “Home Grown School Meals Programme” (HGSMP) links schools and local agricultural producon by transferring funds directly to schools, enabling them to purchase food directly from local suppliers and farmers. Aer transion of several thousand schools from the tradional WFP in
-
kind school meals programme to the Government
-
led HGSMP in large parts of the country, in 2012, the Ministry of Educaon requested WFP to assist with a new and more challenging phase to expand the programme into Kenya’s arid lands. In response, WFP began implemenng a “Transional Cash Transfer to Schools” (TCTS) pilot in Isiolo County. This pilot is demonstrang that with the right support, even schools in Kenya’s arid lands – where producon is more limited and markets relavely weaker – can purchase food locally, and empower parents and teachers to manage their own quality school meals programmes.
Students in the school meals programme in Isiolo County.
WFP/Rose Ogola
 
 
How WFP Kenya Switched School Meals from In
-
kind to Cash
 
1
 
7
 
2
 
4
 
3
 
5
 
6
 
Studied the food markets.
A comprehensive study of the food markets in Kenya’s arid lands helped WFP Kenya to understand the constraints and opportunies that schools would face when buying food each term.
Mapped the schools.
 It is important to know precisely where the schools are in relaon to the specic markets and transport corridors. WFP Kenya used this informaon to calculate a transfer value to ensure remote schools (that face higher food prices) are not disadvantaged by the switch from in
-
kind food to cash.
Consulted all stakeholders to develop a strategy.
Stakeholders agreed on a detailed plan for a sustainable transion from in
-
kind school meals to a government
-
led, community
-
owned and cash
-
based programme. It is important to keep consulng every step of the way to ensure full buy
-
in from all stakeholders.
 
Built the capacity of schools (teachers and parents) to run the cash
-
based school meals programme.
Emphasis was placed on nancial management, compeve procurement, proper record keeping, and food quality. They started with a training, but followed up with hands
-
on support throughout the process.
 
Built the capacity of local suppliers to supply the school meals market.
WFP Purchase for Progress (P4P) colleagues trained local traders to compete in the new market.
 
Priorized transparency and accountability.
Intensive monitoring and connuous oversight was conducted at the school level. Communies were given easy access to informaon and a hotline to report issues.* Controls were put in place and discipline was meted out swily to those who tried to breach them.
Prepared to share the results widely.
Describing the process and the controls that are in place, and demonstrang the posive benets can help other WFP countries that are interested in pilong a cash
-
based home grown school meals programme.
KEY STEPS
 
* See Knowledge Series on WFP Kenya’s Complaints and Feedback Mechanism.
 
 
How were communies involved?
 
Kenya’s arid areas have relied on food aid for decades. The communies with high poverty levels have not had enough say in the type of assistance they receive. Encouraging community ownership and parcipaon was a key part of the pilot and was achieved through two main mechanisms.
School meals programme commiees (SMPC) were elected.
Each commiee had eight members: the head teacher, school meals programme teacher and two other teachers, and four parents. The SMPC managed the food procurement and school meals bank account, and oversaw the use of the funds and food. Each commiee was chaired by a parent member who was also signatory to the account. In total, 392 parents were involved in the pilot.
 
A helpline to report issues or get informaon.
 Posters were hung at the schools, children took leaets home, and communies were informed about the hotline through
barazas
 (community meengs). The hotline was used by traders, parents, teachers, and concerned community members.
Who were the main partners and donors?
 
The Ministry of Educaon, Science and Technology (MOEST); Agricultural Market Development Trust Kenya (AGMARK); bank managers, primary schools, school children and their parents in Isiolo County were the main partners. The Department of Trade, Foreign Aairs and Development (Canada) funded the iniave.
 
How was the approach validated?
 
The strategy and early results of the pilot were presented to stakeholders during a validaon meeng in Nairobi. At the eld level, during preparatory meengs for Term 1 2014, the results of the previous term were reviewed with MOEST county/sub
-
county teams and parents). WFP sta from in the country oce, sub
-
oces, and regional oce were briefed on the results and lessons learned through a learning event broadcast through a web
-
based conferencing facility (Webex).
What were the success factors?
 
Cash transfers can work for school meals even in areas where there is limited or no local producon and very limited capacity at the school level. Crical success factors include a strong collaboraon between WFP and MOEST, the building of condence and capacity of parents to take it on, and building capacity of local traders to parcipate in the new market. Increased parental involvement in children’s educaon is also important for successful educaonal results.
What were the challenges?
 
Parents who are illiterate are less likely to be elected to the SMPCs. Given that illiteracy disproporonately aects women, this makes it more dicult for them to parcipate. In addion, local producon of grains is limited in arid areas and traders are not accustomed to structured markets. WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme is working with local grain traders to prepare them for the new school meals market. Quality issues connue to be a challenge as some traders do not fumigate the maize and beans before delivering to schools.
What is the impact so far?
 
For over 30 years, primary schools in the arid lands have received in
-
kind food aid. Parents did not parcipate nor did they inuence what their children ate at school. They had lile informaon about the programme, and no clear mechanism for reporng problems. The TCTS pilot is helping to idenfy the best way to transion the schools into the naonal HGSMP. With the new approach, parents are involved in receipt and management of funds, they have a say in what their children eat for lunch at school and a structured way to lodge complaints. Local food suppliers and Kenyan producers benet and new businesses have been established in remote areas.
What was the meframe?
 
WFP’s support for the expansion of the Government
-
led and community
-
owned home grown school meals programme included the development of a strategy (April
-
September 2013), a ‘transional cash to schools’ pilot (May
-
December 2014), and hands
-
on learning. The market study was done in 2012, and preparaons began in January 2013. From start to nish, the iniave took about 18 months.
 
Top:
A school cook prepares lunch for the students.
WFP/Charisse Tillman
 
Boom:
A tender opening with local traders, parents and teach-ers.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->