Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
1Activity
P. 1
Environmental Risks and Challenges of Anthropogenic Metals Flows and Cycles

Environmental Risks and Challenges of Anthropogenic Metals Flows and Cycles

Ratings: (0)|Views: 18|Likes:
Full report
Full report

More info:

Published by: United Nations Environment Programme on Jun 03, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/27/2014

pdf

text

original

 
   U
   N   I   T   E   D
    N
   A   T   I   O   N   S
    E
   N   V   I   R   O   N   M   E   N   T
    P
   R   O   G   R   A   M   M   E
E
NVIRONMENTAL
 R
ISKS
 
 AND
 C
HALLENGES
 
OF
 A 
NTHROPOGENIC
 M
ETALS
 F
LOWS
 
 AND
 C
 YCLES
 
 
Acknowledgments
Editor: International Resource Panel, Working Group on the Global Metal FlowsLead author: Ester van der Voet, University of Leiden, Netherlands; Chapter editors: Ester van der Voet, Leiden University, Netherlands; Reijo Salminen,Geological Survey Finland, Finland; Matthew Eckelman, North Eastern University, Boston, USA; Gavin Mudd, Monash University,  Australia; Terry Norgate, CSIRO Minerals Down Under Flagship, Australia; Roland Hischier, EMPA, Switzerland; Contributing authors: Job Spij-ker, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Netherlands; Martina Vijver, Leiden University, Netherlands; Olle Selinus, Linneaus University, Sweden; Leo Posthuma, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Netherlands; Dick de Zwart, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Netherlands; Dik van de Meent, Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands; Markus Reuter, Outotec Oyj, Espoo, Finland; Ladji Tikana, German Copper Development Association, Germany; Sonia Valdivia, UNEP, France; Patrick Wäger, EMPA, Swit-zerland; Michael Hauschild, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark; Arjan de Koning, Leiden University, Netherlands. The following people have contributed by reviewing draft versions of the report and providing valuable information and comments (Alphabeti-cal): John Atherton, International Council on Mining and Metals; Caroline Braibant, European Precious Metals Federation; Clare Broadbent,
World Steel Association; Peter Campbell, Université du Québec, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Canada; Sandra Carey, Interna-
tional Molybdenum Association; Grant Darrie, International Chromium Development Association; Katrien Delbeke, European Copper Institute; Johannes Drielsma, Euromines; Alain Dubreuil, Natural Resources Canada, Canada; Maria Amelia Enriquez, Federal University of Pará State, Brazil; Kevin Farley, Manhattan College, USA; Thomas Graedel, Yale University, USA; Edgar Hertwich, Norwegian University of Science and  Technology, Norway, Paola Kistler, Rio Tinto, Switzerland; Christian Leroy, European Aluminium Association; Eirik Nordheim, European Alu-minium Association; Jerome Nriagu, University of Michigan, USA, Jozef M. Pacyna, Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Norway; Claudia Peña, Chilean Research Centre for Mining and Metallurgy, Chile; Patrick van Sprang, Arche Consulting Brussels, Belgium; Sangwon Suh, University of California, USA; Frans Vollenbroek, European Commission, Belgium; Pia Voutilainen, Scandinavian Copper Development Association, Finland and (further) representatives of the following organisations: Codelco, Euromines, European Aluminium Association, European Precious Metals Federation, International Chromium Development Association, International Copper Association, International Council on Mining and Metals, International Molybdenum Association, International Zinc Association, Rio Tinto, and World Steel Association.
 The report went through several rounds of peer-review coordinated in an efficient and constructive way by Jacqueline Aloisi de Larderel together
with the International Resource Panel Secretariat. Valuable comments were received from several anonymous reviewers in this process. The prepa-
ration of this report also benefited from discussions with many colleagues at various meetings.
Special thanks go to Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker and Ashok Khosla as Co-Chairs of the International Resource Panel for their continuing support and encouragement, as well as to the members of the International Resource Panel and its Steering Committee for their dedication and commit-ment and additional helpful comments.
Special thanks also go to Melanie Studer (Leiden University, Netherlands) for her support during the final stages of the document preparation.
Shaoyi Li, Tomas Marques and Philip Strothmann, UNEP, provided valuable input and comments; the International Resource Panel’s Secretariat
coordinated the preparation of this report. Sibylle Schmidtchen and the team from 3f design were instrumental in creating and editing the figures
and graphics.  The main responsibility for errors remains with the authors.
UNEP promotes environ-mentally sound practices globally and in its own activities. Please print this publication – when printing is necessary – on recycling paper or FSC certified paper. Our distri-bution policy aims to reduce UNEP’s carbon footprint.
 The report should be referenced as follows: UNEP (2013) Environmental Risks and Challenges of Anthropogenic Metals Flows and Cycles, A Report of the Working Group on the Global Metal Flows to the International Resource Panel. van der Voet, E.; Salminen, R.; Eckelman, M.; Mudd, G.; Norgate, T.; Hischier, R.
Copyright © United Nations Environment Programme, 2013
 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form for educational or nonprofit purposes without special permission from
the copyright holder, provided acknowledgement of the source is made. UNEP would appreciate receiving a copy of any publication that uses this publication as a source.No use of this publication may be made for resale or for any other commercial purpose whatsoever without prior permission in writing from the United Nations Environment Programme.Design/layout: 3f design, cover concept, UNEP.Photos: iStockphoto.com: background title/page 14 ©
 
gitches,
title 1 © oneclearvision, title 2 © Marco Hegner, title 3 © Milos Peric, title 4
© DNY 59,
page 4 ©
 Ermin Rothenberger,
page 24 ©
 Phil Augustavo,
page 30 ©
 Rob Belknap,
page 46 ©
 Bart Coenders,
page 46 ©
 Wooden Dinosaur,
page 56 ©
 manfredxy,
page 72 ©
 iofoto,
page 74 ©
 ugur bariskan,
page 94 ©
 Don Wilkie,
page 116 ©
 Bart van den Dikkenberg,
page 127 ©
 Daniel Schoenen,
page 128 ©
 Ugurhan Betin,
page 144 ©
 Cliff Parnell,
page 155 ©
 Zsolt Biczó,
page 162 ©
 Ben Klaus,
page 190 ©
 Justin Bryant,
page 207 ©
 Rob Broek,
page 220 ©
 Judy Kennamer. Others: see captions.
Disclaimer
 The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the United Nations Environment Programme concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Moreover, the views expressed do not necessarily represent the decision or the stated policy of the United Nations Environment Programme, nor does citing of trade names or commercial processes constitute endorsement.
ISBN: 978-92-807-3266-5Job Number: DTI/1534/PA
 
E
NVIRONMENTAL
 R
ISKS
 
 AND
 C
HALLENGES
 
OF
 A 
NTHROPOGENIC
 M
ETALS
 F
LOWS
 
 AND
 C
 YCLES
 
* This is report 3 of the Global Metal Flows Working Group of the International Resource Panel of UNEP.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->