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DNA Who Control the Evidence

DNA Who Control the Evidence

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Published by David G. Caban
DNA Forensics was one of the greatest scientific tool known to man. It not only rescue those wrongfully convicted, but still there are many withheld the opportunity of freedom. Many prisoners are wrongfully convicted still seeking justice, but those who hold the justice seat feel strongly releasing those wrongfully accused would only increase the courts error-rate. Must read!
DNA Forensics was one of the greatest scientific tool known to man. It not only rescue those wrongfully convicted, but still there are many withheld the opportunity of freedom. Many prisoners are wrongfully convicted still seeking justice, but those who hold the justice seat feel strongly releasing those wrongfully accused would only increase the courts error-rate. Must read!

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: David G. Caban on Nov 21, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/17/2011

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DNA Truth and Fallacies
The History of DNA Forensics-Who Controls the Evidence
ByDavid G. CABAN, MBA
 History of DNA Forensics
DNA technology is a system that was developed as in the early 19
th
Century.Gregor Michael developed the science of inherited characteristics in history of inheritedcharacteristics of pea plants in 1866 (Naughton, 2005). The concept of inheritedcharacteristics is the basis of DNA technology, and it was first utilized in the criminal justice system in the mid 1980’s. DNA Technology won its first conviction in the UnitedStates in 1987 (Naughton, 2005).DNA, which is abbreviated for deoxyribonucleic acid that consist of two chains of nucleotides bonded together in a double helix. This scientific evidence is responsible for determine the inherit characteristic of each living organism (Naughton, 2005).Historically, DNA can be extracted reliably from clean blood specimen, and-or other metabolic fluids, such as, semen and other biological fluids that can be link to itsoriginal source (Naughton, 20005). For example, bloodstains found on a shirt can be traceto the individual or perpetrator.The problematic issue with DNA evidence is that it can be manipulated to win aconviction, also, keeping innocent people behind bars for the sake of a political agenda(Naughton, 2005).
 History of DNA Technology
1
 
DNA Truth and FallaciesThe first conviction used by DNA evidence occurred in Portland, Oregon in 1987.During the early phases of DNA evidence jurors were confused as to the process of DNAevidence linking to the defendant.DNA evidence for the past twenty-five (25) years was not only utilized to convict people of crime, but also, innocent people wrongfully convicted of crimes were free based on DNA evidence. Furthermore, within the past 25 years over 10 death rowinmates in the United States have been exonerated from their conviction based on DNAevidence.The faulty evidence utilized in the past have been eyewitness testimony, however,through DNA Technology contradicted eyewitness account. As a result, severalindividuals’ serving either lengthy prison terms and on death row was exonerated, because DNA analysis proved their innocence (Brown, 2005, p. 1588).An English scientist named Alec J. Jeffreys first introduced DNA analysis in1985. The late 1980’s DNA finally used evidence by both law enforcement and theFederal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). DNA consists of comparing selected segments of molecules from different sources. Because of the fact, DNA molecules are comprise of  billions of segments, however, only a small portion of the individual is extracted todetermine someone’s fate.The genomic strand is a DNA strand that makes up the individual structure. TheDNA strand can also be duplicated, For example, to duplicate DNA from plants andanimals for scientific research (Sunderland, West, Waterworth and Bray, 2005). Aduplication of cells for scientific study may not present any problem, however, if needed2
 
DNA Truth and Fallaciesto manipulate scientific evidence can be probable (Sunderland, West, Waterworth, andBray, 2005).In relation to prisoners and lifers pleading his or her innocence DNA forensic can benefit. DNA technology is used to compare evidence, for example, semen samples of rape victims are analyzed with the accursed perpetrator blood sample. As a result, thedefendant is deemed innocent (Naughton, 2005). Quite the contrary, DNA evidence canalso be distorted by manipulating scientific evidence that misrepresent the guilt of thedefendant (Naughton, 2005). Manipulating state’s evidence is artistic, which the stateattorney could potentially used to win a conviction (Cole, 2007; Naughton, 2005). For example, in some capital punishment cases lifers charged for sex crimes were unable to pursue DNA technology to prove their innocence (Cole, 2007; Naughton, 2005). Becauseof the fact, DNA evidence collected from the crime scene had been either destroyed or discarded (Risinger, 2007). As a result, people wrongfully accused of crimes becamesubject for the penal system. The defendant either had too accepted the consequences of acrime that neither he nor she committed. Furthermore continuing the protest of their innocence (Cole, 2007; Naughton, 2005).The concept of releasing inmate from the prison system is not based onconvincing the system your innocent, but rather, your outcome in the future, which woulddetermine becoming eligible for parole (Naughton, 2005). However, the penal system, aswell as, it staffers are clinging to the courts decision or verdict (Naughton, 2005).Therefore, if a prisoner or lifer is innocent they must admit to the crime he or she iscommitted, which is one of the penal guideline for either early release or parole(Naughton, 2005). In addition, prisoners or lifers knowingly of their innocents are3

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