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The American Jesuits

The American Jesuits

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Published by NYU Press
Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2008 With infectious energy and a genuine gift for storytelling, Raymond A. Schroth recounts the history of Jesuits in the United States. The American Jesuits isn?t simply a book for Catholics; it?s for anyone who loves a well-told historical tale. For more than 450 years, Jesuit priests have traveled the globe out of a religious commitment to serve others. Their order, the Society of Jesus, is the largest religious order of men in the Catholic Church, with more than 20,000 members around the world and almost 3,000 in the United States. It is one of the more liberal orders in the Church, taking very public stands in the U.S. on behalf of social justice causes such as the promotion of immigrants? rights and humanitarian aid, including assistance to Africa?s poor, and against American involvement in ?unjust wars.? Jesuits have played an important part in Americanizing the Catholic Church and in preparing Catholic immigrants for inclusion into American society.Starting off with the first Jesuit to reach the New World — he was promptly murdered on the Florida coast — Schroth focuses on the key periods of the Jesuit experience in the Americas, beginning with the era of European explorers, many of whom were accompanied by Jesuits and some of whom were Jesuits themselves. Suppressed around the time of the American Revolution, the Society experienced resurgence in the nineteenth century, arriving in the U.S. along with waves of Catholic immigrants and establishing a network of high schools and universities. In the mid-twentieth century, the Society transformed itself to serve an urbanizing nation.Schroth is not blind to the Society?s shortcomings and not all of his story reflects well on the Jesuits. However, as he reminds readers, Jesuits are not gods and they don?t dwell in mountaintop monasteries. Rather, they are imperfect men who work in a messy world to ?find God in all things? — and to help their fellow men and women do the same.A quintessential American tale of men willing to take risks — for Indians, blacks, immigrants, and the poor, and to promote a loving picture of God — The American Jesuits offers a broad and compelling look at the impact of this 400-year-old international order on American culture and the culture?s impact on the Jesuits.
Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2008 With infectious energy and a genuine gift for storytelling, Raymond A. Schroth recounts the history of Jesuits in the United States. The American Jesuits isn?t simply a book for Catholics; it?s for anyone who loves a well-told historical tale. For more than 450 years, Jesuit priests have traveled the globe out of a religious commitment to serve others. Their order, the Society of Jesus, is the largest religious order of men in the Catholic Church, with more than 20,000 members around the world and almost 3,000 in the United States. It is one of the more liberal orders in the Church, taking very public stands in the U.S. on behalf of social justice causes such as the promotion of immigrants? rights and humanitarian aid, including assistance to Africa?s poor, and against American involvement in ?unjust wars.? Jesuits have played an important part in Americanizing the Catholic Church and in preparing Catholic immigrants for inclusion into American society.Starting off with the first Jesuit to reach the New World — he was promptly murdered on the Florida coast — Schroth focuses on the key periods of the Jesuit experience in the Americas, beginning with the era of European explorers, many of whom were accompanied by Jesuits and some of whom were Jesuits themselves. Suppressed around the time of the American Revolution, the Society experienced resurgence in the nineteenth century, arriving in the U.S. along with waves of Catholic immigrants and establishing a network of high schools and universities. In the mid-twentieth century, the Society transformed itself to serve an urbanizing nation.Schroth is not blind to the Society?s shortcomings and not all of his story reflects well on the Jesuits. However, as he reminds readers, Jesuits are not gods and they don?t dwell in mountaintop monasteries. Rather, they are imperfect men who work in a messy world to ?find God in all things? — and to help their fellow men and women do the same.A quintessential American tale of men willing to take risks — for Indians, blacks, immigrants, and the poor, and to promote a loving picture of God — The American Jesuits offers a broad and compelling look at the impact of this 400-year-old international order on American culture and the culture?s impact on the Jesuits.

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Publish date: Oct 1, 2007
Added to Scribd: Nov 21, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780814740255
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Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Schroth, a Jesuit priest and professor of humanities at St. Peter's College in Jersey City, N.J., tells the story of the Society of Jesus' presence in North America in this account that begins with a martyrdom on the coast of Florida in 1566. From humble beginnings as missionaries bent on converting Native Americans, the society grew over nearly five centuries on this continent into an organization best known today for its work in education and social activism. In between, members have served as war chaplains and antiwar protesters, high school and college educators, and writers and editors addressing church and societal issues through the community's influential magazine America. Blending history and analysis, Schroth chronicles the society's weaknesses and failures, too, including its foot-dragging on racial issues, ranging from its involvement in slavery in the 19th century to slowness in integrating its schools in the 20th. Schroth also discusses the community's decline in numbers, but he ends on a hopeful note, quoting the late Karl Rahner: "There will always be men who... pass by all the idols of this world and dare to give themselves unconditionally to the incomprehensibility of God, seen as love and mercy." This is absorbing reading for those with an interest in the Jesuits. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

2007-08-13, Publishers Weekly
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