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Fm27-10 Law on the Land Under Letters Marque

Fm27-10 Law on the Land Under Letters Marque

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Published by: Kimarie Runningdrummer Teter on Jun 08, 2014
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10/30/2014

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 FM 27-10
Appendix A - i
FM 27-10
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY FIELD MANUAL
THE LAW OF LAND WARFARE
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY JULY 1956
 
 FM 27-10
Appendix A - ii
FM 27-10 C 1
CHANGE HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY  No. 1 WASHINGTON, D. C.,
15 July 1976
THE LAW OF LAND WARFARE
FM 27-10, 18 July 1956, is changed as follows:
 Page 5.
Paragraph 5
a
(13) is added: (13) Geneva protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous, or Other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare of 17 June 1925
(T. I.A .S.
 —), cited herein as Geneva Protocol of 1925.
 Page 18.
Paragraph 37
b
is superseded as follows:
b. Discussion of Rule.
The foregoing rule prohibits the use in war of poison or  poisoned weapons against human beings. Restrictions on the use of herbicides as well as treaty provisions concerning chemical and bacteriological warfare are discussed in  paragraph 38.
 Page 18.
Paragraph 38 is superseded as follows:
38. Chemical and Bacteriological Warfare
 
a
.
Treaty Provision.
Whereas the use in war of asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases, and of all analogous liquids, materials or devices, has been justly condemned by the general opinion of the civilized world; and Whereas the prohibition of such use has been declared in Treaties to which the majority of Powers of the world are Parties; and To the end that this prohibition shall be universally accepted as a part of International Law, binding alike the conscience and the practice of nations:
* * *
the High Contracting Parties, so far as they are not already Parties to Treaties prohibiting such use, accept this prohibition, agree to extend this prohibition to the use of bacteriological methods of warfare and agree to be bound as between themselves according to the terms of this declaration. (Geneva Protocol of 1925.)
 b. United States Reservation to the Geneva Protocol of 1925.
The said Protocol shall cease to be  binding on the government of the United States with respect to the use in war of asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases, and of all analogous liquids, materials, or devices, in regard to an enemy State if such State or any of its allies fails to respect the prohibitions laid down in the Protocol.
 
 
 FM 27-10
Appendix A - iii
c. Renunciation of Certain Uses in War of Chemical Herbicides and Riot Control Agents.
The United States renounces, as a matter of national policy, first use of herbicides in war except use, under regulations applicable to their domestic use, for control of vegetation within US bases and installations or around their immediate defensive perimeters, and first use of riot control agents in war except in defensive military modes to save lives such as:
 (1)
Use of riot control agents in riot control situations in areas under direct and distinct US military control, to include controlling rioting prisoners of war.
 (2)
Use of riot control agents in situations in which civilians are used to mask or screen attacks and civilian casualties can be reduced or avoided.
 (3)
Use of riot control agents in rescue missions in remotely isolated areas, of downed aircrews and  passengers, and escaping prisoners.
 (4)
Use of riot control agents in rear echelon areas outside the zone of immediate combat to protect convoys from civil disturbances, terrorists and paramilitary organizations.
* * * * *
 NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States of America by the Constitution and laws of the United States and as Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States, it is hereby ordered as follows: SECTION 1. The Secretary of Defense shall take all necessary measures to ensure that the use by the Armed Forces of the United States of any riot control agents and chemical herbicides in war is prohibited unless such use has Presidential approval, in advance. SECTION 2. The Secretary of Defense shall prescribe the rules and regulations he deems necessary to ensure that the national policy herein announced shall be observed by the Armed Forces of the United States.
(Exec. Order No. 11850, 40 Fed. Reg. 16187 (1975).) d. Discussion.
Although the language of the 1925 Geneva Protocol appears to ban unqualifiedly the use in war of the chemical weapons within the scope of its prohibition, reservations submitted by most of the Parties to the Protocol, including the United States, have, in effect, rendered the Protocol a prohibition only of the first use in war of materials within its scope. Therefore, the United States, like many other Parties, has reserved the right to use chemical weapons against a state if that state or any of its allies fails to respect the prohibitions of the Protocol. The reservation of the United States does not, however, reserve the right to retaliate with  bacteriological methods of warfare against a state if that state or any of its allies fails to respect the  prohibitions of the Protocol. The prohibition concerning bacteriological methods of warfare which the United States has accepted under the Protocol, therefore, proscribes not only the initial but also any retaliatory use of bacteriological methods of warfare. In this connection, the United States considers  bacteriological methods of warfare to include not only biological weapons but also toxins, which, although not living organisms and therefore susceptible of being characterized as chemical agents, are generally produced from biological agents. All toxins, however, regardless of the manner of production, are regarded by the United States as bacteriological methods of warfare within the meaning of the  proscription of the Geneva Protocol of 1925. Concerning chemical weapons, the United States considers the Geneva Protocol of 1925 as applying to both lethal and incapacitating chemical agents. Incapacitating agents are those producing symptoms that persist for hours or even days after exposure to the agent has terminated. It is the position of the United States that the Geneva Protocol of 1925 does not prohibit the use in war of either chemical herbicides or riot control agents, which are those agents of a type widely used by governments for law enforcement purposes because they produce, in all but the most unusual circumstances, merely transient effects that disappear within minutes after exposure to the agent has terminated. In this connection,

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