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Paul's Poem.

Paul's Poem.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. S. P. LONG, A. M


1 Cor. 13.

THOUGH I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and
have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tink-
ling cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy, and
understand all mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all
faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I
am nothing. And though I bestow all my goods' to feed the poor,
and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity,
it profiteth me nothing. Charity suffereth long, and is kind, charity
envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up. Doth
not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked,
thinketh no evil; rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth;
beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all
things. Charity never faileth : but whether there be prophecies, they
shall fail; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be
knowledge, it shall vanish away. For we know in part, and we prophesy
in part. But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in
part shall be done away. When I was a child, I spake as a child, I
understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I .became a man,
I put away childish things. For now we see through a glass, darkly,
but then face to face; now I know in part, but then I shall know even
as also I am known. An now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three,
but the greatest of these is charity.
BY REV. S. P. LONG, A. M


1 Cor. 13.

THOUGH I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and
have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tink-
ling cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy, and
understand all mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all
faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I
am nothing. And though I bestow all my goods' to feed the poor,
and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity,
it profiteth me nothing. Charity suffereth long, and is kind, charity
envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up. Doth
not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked,
thinketh no evil; rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth;
beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all
things. Charity never faileth : but whether there be prophecies, they
shall fail; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be
knowledge, it shall vanish away. For we know in part, and we prophesy
in part. But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in
part shall be done away. When I was a child, I spake as a child, I
understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I .became a man,
I put away childish things. For now we see through a glass, darkly,
but then face to face; now I know in part, but then I shall know even
as also I am known. An now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three,
but the greatest of these is charity.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jun 09, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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Paul's Poem. BY REV. S. P. LOG, A. M 1 Cor. 13. THOUGH I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tink- ling cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing. And though I bestow all my goods' to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing. Charity suffereth long, and is kind, charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up. Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth; beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things. Charity never faileth : but whether there be prophecies, they shall fail; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall vanish away. For we know in part, and we prophesy in part. But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away. When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I .became a man, I put away childish things. For now we see through a glass, darkly, but then face to face; now I know in part, but then I shall know even as also I am known. An now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three, but the greatest of these is charity. Sanctify us, O Lord, through Thy truth : Thy Word is truth. Amen. Beloved in Christ : The Apostle Paul was one of the greatest men that ever appeared in this world. He was great in every sense ; he was great simply as a man ; he was great as an apostle
 
and did more than all the other eleven; he was great as a Christian ; he was great as a missionary ; he was great as a poet. If the Apostle Paul had been a German, he would 267 268 THE ETERAL EPISTLE. have surpassed Schiller and Goethe; if an Englishman, he would have surpassed Shakesi)eare and Milton. There is not one poem in the world that surpasses the thirteenth chapter of First Corinthians. Peter was the apostle of hope; Paul the apostle of faith, the great theologian; and John was the apostle of love, but John never pro- claimed love Avith more puritv and with more sincerity than Paul did in this thirteenth chapter. We wish there- fore that the Holy Spirit may bless the message of the morning while Ave dwell on PAULAS POEM. I. Love's valuation. II. Love's operation. III. Love's duration. I. What is love worth? ^'Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries, and all knoAvledge ; and though I have all faith, so that I could remoA^e mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing. And though I bestoAv all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing." What a valua- tion of true love! 1. First of all we are reminded of the fact that it is Avorth more than all eloquence. "Though I speak with
 
the tongues of men and of angels and haA^e not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal." There haA^e been men in history who, by means of their eloquence haA^e changed the destiny of nations ; men who, by their eloquence have decided who sliall sit upon the throne and Avho shall not ; there have been men who have swayed the audience to and fro like the waves of the sea, by means of a gifted tongue, and yet, my friends, if Ave had tongues such as men never had on earth, if we had the tongues of angels, like tliose that sang on the plains of Judea when Christ Avas born, if we had the tongues of the QUIQUAGESIMA SUDAY. 269 angel that swept over the valley of Sennacherib and slew one hundred and eighty-five thousand soldiers, if we had the eloquence of those that sing around the throne on high, and had not love in our hearts, Ave would be like sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal. Brass will make music, but you never saw a brass instrument in all your life that had a heart in it. Any one may take cymbals and strike them together, and make a noise, but after it is all done it is only a noise; and when a man stands before his congre- gation, or before a public audience of any kind, and simply has an eloquent tongue, and no love for humanity, you might as well blow through a brass horn, or take cymbals, strike them together and make a noise. There is nothing in it. The Apostle Paul therefore calls attention to the fact that all eloquence amounts to nothing of there is no love in the heart of him who speaks. 2. Again, this love is worth more than great inspira- tion. How many mothers of old used to jjray that their sons might be prophets. A Pro]Dhet in the days of the Old Testament was far greater than a king. Elijah, the prophet, stood far above Ahab or his queen ; but though a man were a proj)het, if he had not love in his heart, he would be nothing. Jonah was a prophet ; he was sent out

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