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Let Us Alone.

Let Us Alone.

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Published by glennpease
BY REV. STEPHEN H. TYNG, JR., D.D.,


" Let us alone : what have we to do with Thee, Thou Jesus of Nazareth ? art Thou come to destroy us ? I know Thee who Thou art, the Holy One of God. And Jesus rebuked him, saying, Hold thy peace, and come out of him." — Mark i : 24, 25.
BY REV. STEPHEN H. TYNG, JR., D.D.,


" Let us alone : what have we to do with Thee, Thou Jesus of Nazareth ? art Thou come to destroy us ? I know Thee who Thou art, the Holy One of God. And Jesus rebuked him, saying, Hold thy peace, and come out of him." — Mark i : 24, 25.

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Published by: glennpease on Jun 10, 2014
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LET US ALOE. BY REV. STEPHE H. TYG, JR., D.D., " Let us alone : what have we to do with Thee, Thou Jesus of azareth ? art Thou come to destroy us ? I know Thee who Thou art, the Holy One of God. And Jesus rebuked him, saying, Hold thy peace, and come out of him." — Mark i : 24, 25. How manifold, were the questions that our Lord Jesus answer- ed. He was plied with strange queries which would have sadly puzzled any other than Him. They fell about Him as the arrows and darts of an army of bowmen and spearmen ; but He not only evaded them — He took them up and sent them back with divine force. All the different schools of philosophy, the contrasted sects of the Jewish religion, the partizans of Herod, and the seditious of the people, bigots and infidels, the Sanhedrim and devils were confederate in the purpose and effort to entrap Jesus of azareth. They strove to ensnare Him in His talk, and they were worsted in every effort. They gathered in motley groups about Him, de- termined by the variety and contradictoriness of their questions to demonstrate His ignorance, and so to confound Him before the people. But He never lacked, through His many years of Life, so far as we have His sayings recorded, an appropriate and conclu- sive answer to every question, whether the traditions of the law, or the subtleties of the schools, or the prevailing interpretations of the prophets, whether the lawfulness of tribute, the reasons for di- vorce, the philosophy of the resurrection, or the economy of the future life were in debate. He endured a worse cross-examina- tion than Socrates ever conceived, and came off the victor in every contest ; for He was compelled, without the possibility of fore- thought, to meet these questions sometimes in the street, some- LET US ALOE. 105 times in the synagogue, then in the court of the temple. On the
 
instant ILe must adjust the truth to as many systems of specula- tion and morals as there were tempting mouths and men. He proved His mission in the face of every sort of provocation. He was conqueror over every conceivable cavil. His replies demon- strated a readiness of wisdom and resources of knowledge which, as in the passage before us, elicited the wonder of the people. Whilst never thrusting Himself into the war of words, which was the peculiar mark of the generation in which He lived, Jesus Christ never evaded their curiosity, nor shunned to declare the whole counsel of God. Again and again did they invade His retirement. They strove by all sorts of suggestions to cause the laugh against Him among the common people, who heard Him gladly. They were mortified, however, by their constant dis- comfitures, and hastily retired from the conflict, confessing de- feat, until at last the hour came when it is written : " either durst any man from that day forward ask Him any more questions." But these questions and answers have outlived that generation. They make the chief matters of social and religious discussion of to-day. The world has not changed its relations to Jesus Christ. It has changed its customs, its form of government, the way in which it applies and enforces its laws ; but it has not been exor- cised of its opposition to the azarene. There is the same malig- nity of motive, the same disingenuousness of method, the same bitterness of men towards the person and truth of Jesus Christ, as when He walked in azareth or worshipped in Jerusalem. ay, the extending knowledge and influence of His gospel, in this nineteenth century, only gives malice more occasion, profan- ity more oaths, immorality a deeper dye than it had in the olden time. The queries to which Jesus gave answers have increased in intensity. But whilst the world is repeating its old questions, would it not be well for Christian people to recall the answers ? I hold that there is not a question of infidelity which is now asked, there is not a single objection of social philosophy, which is now projected against the gospel, which was not held eighteen hundred years ago, and answered as soon as asked, and in this Book is to be found a solution of the problem. We have that as our introductory thought this evening. The world is busy in its disputes, but it is very careful to conceal the fact that
 
it was once worsted and overwhelmed, that its sophistries have been exposed, that its satires have been despoiled, its lances of logic have been broken, so that the feathered ends of pointless shafts alone are within its power. Let the old questions that are revived be met by all Christian people with the old annihilating answers, for in these the Lord Jesus has left us an inexhaustible 106 UDER CAVAS. armory of defence. The man that sticks closest to the Bible is the man that shall have the most glorious triumph. Our text is one of the first examples of our Lord's marvel- lous self-possession and wise reply. St. Mark tells us He had come to Capernaum. It was the Sabbath day. He entered into the synagogue, as was His custom ; He expounded the law, and the people were astonished at His doctrine ; for He taught them as one having authority. There was among the worshippers one possessed of an unclean spirit, who cried out, " Let us alone ; what have we to do with Thee, Thou Jesus of azareth ?" This was his prayer in the synagogue. The Lord rebuked him. "Hold thy peace, and come out of him." Two persons were recognized  — the demon and the poor possessed one. For the one He had rebuke ; to the other His tone was full of tender compassion. I suppose that the circumstances of this scene are fulfilled to- night. This is the Lord's day. It is the hour of prayer ; we are in our synagogue ; and doubtless there are some persons here who in soliloquy have said, over and over again, let me alone ; what have I to do with Jesus of azareth ? May God the Holy Spirit make plain to you, dear friend, the voice of rebuke, and may the commanding voice of Jesus say : " Come out of him ;" so that clothed and in your right mind you shall be found before the evening is over, sitting at Jesus' feet. I. ow I have to say in reference to this text, first, Listen to the prayer of indifference : " Let us alone ; what have we to do with Jesus of azareth ? " The time of demoniacal possessions has passed ; the day of devils is over ; and yet the devil still

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