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The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Georgia

The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Georgia

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Published by Judy
This study seeks to inform the debate over a proposal in Georgia to give tax credits for contributions to organizations that provide scholarships to K-12 private schools. Such a program would extend to K-12 education the philosophy of choice that is inherent in the state’s existing Hope Scholarships program for college students. This study constructs a model to determine the fiscal impact of tax-credit scholarships on the state and on local school districts.
This study seeks to inform the debate over a proposal in Georgia to give tax credits for contributions to organizations that provide scholarships to K-12 private schools. Such a program would extend to K-12 education the philosophy of choice that is inherent in the state’s existing Hope Scholarships program for college students. This study constructs a model to determine the fiscal impact of tax-credit scholarships on the state and on local school districts.

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Published by: Judy on Mar 17, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/08/2014

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Parent Choice or Georgia:
Many agree with the concept.Some disagree. And somesimply want more inormation.As the public debate continuesto grow louder about how bestto provide a quality educationto all Georgia children, it iscritical to know the acts aboutparent choice, and to have anunderstanding o how parentchoice programs have hadan impact on communities,parents and students aroundthe country. All o this analysisis done with one goal in mind:The best possible education orall o Georgia’s children.
The Fiscal Impact oTax-Credit Scholarshipsin Georgia
Prepared By:Brian Gottlob
Senior FellowFriedman Foundation or Educational Choice
February 2008
Study released jointly by the Friedman Foundation or Educational Choice, Allianceor School Choice, Georgia Public Policy Foundation, Americans or Prosperity,Black Alliance or Educational Options, and Georgia Family Council
 
A MESSAGE FROM THE FRIEDMAN FOUNDATION:
OUR CHALLENGE TO YOU
Our research adheres to the highest standards o scientic rigor. Weknow that one reason the school choice movement has achieved suchgreat success is because the empirical evidence really does show thatschool choice works. More and more people are dropping their oppo-sition to school choice as they become amiliar with the large bodyo high-quality scientic studies that supports it. Having racked up asteady record o success through good science, why would we sabotageour credibility with junk science? This is our answer to those who say we can’t produce credible researchbecause we aren’t neutral about school choice. Some people think thatgood science can only be produced by researchers who have no opin-ions about the things they study. Like robots, these neutral researchersare supposed to carry out their analyses without actually thinking orcaring about the subjects they study. But what’s the point o doing science in the rst place i we’re never al-lowed to come to any conclusions? Why would we want to stay neutralwhen some policies are solidly proven to work, and others are provento ail? That’s why it’s oolish to dismiss all the studies showing that schoolchoice works on grounds that they were conducted by researchers whothink that school choice works. I we take that approach, we wouldhave to dismiss all the studies showing that smoking causes cancer,because all o them were conducted by researchers who think thatsmoking causes cancer. We would end up rejecting all science acrossthe board.The sensible approach is to accept studies that ollow sound scienticmethods, and reject those that don’t. Science produces reliable empiri-cal inormation, not because scientists are devoid o opinions and mo-tives, but because the rigorous procedural rules o science prevent theresearchers’ opinions and motives rom determining their results. Iresearch adheres to scientic standards, its results can be relied uponno matter who conducted it. I not, then the biases o the researcherdo become relevant, because lack o scientic rigor opens the door orthose biases to aect the results. So i you’re skeptical about our research on school choice, this is ourchallenge to you: prove us wrong. Judge our work by scientic stan-dards and see how it measures up. I you can nd anything in our workthat doesn’t ollow sound empirical methods, by all means say so. Wewelcome any and all scientic critique o our work. But i you can’t ndanything scientically wrong with it, don’t complain that our ndingscan’t be true just because we’re not neutral. That may make a goodsound bite, but what lurks behind it is a fat rejection o science.
 
The Fiscal Impact oTax-Credit Scholarshipsin Georgia
Prepared By:Brian Gottlob
Senior FellowFriedman Foundation or Educational Choice
February 2008

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