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God Our Reward.

God Our Reward.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
By T. T. Munger.


O Thou whose power o'er moving worlds presides,
Whose voice created and whose wisdom guides,
On darkling man in pure effulgence shine,
And cheer the clouded mind with light divine.
By T. T. Munger.


O Thou whose power o'er moving worlds presides,
Whose voice created and whose wisdom guides,
On darkling man in pure effulgence shine,
And cheer the clouded mind with light divine.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jun 11, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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GOD OUR REWARD. By T. T. Munger. O Thou whose power o'er moving worlds presides, Whose voice created and whose wisdom guides, On darkling man in pure effulgence shinei And cheer the clouded mind with light divine. ' Tis thine alone to calm the pious breast With silent confidence and holy rest; From Thee, great God, we spring, to Thee we tend^ Path, Motive, Guide, Original and End.'' Boethius, translated by Db Johnson. ** There entertain him all the saints above, In solemn troops and sweet societies, That sing, and singing in their glory move, And wipe the tears forever from his eyes.*' Lyddas, " With God, the human soul not merely interprets the secret of the miiverse ; it comprehends, and is at peace with itself. For God is the satisfaction of its thirst." — Canon Liddon, Elements of EeUffion, page 80. GOD OUR REWARD.
 
We now take up man's other main need, the pos- itive one, namely, the fulfillment of desires and labors. It is the characteristic of man that he plans and remembers ; he plans to gain an object, he remem- bers his plan and looks for its fulfillment. Life is based on this idea of a return or reward to be gained ; that is, it is not its own reward. It is not enough for man simply to live. The ox lies down in the shade and chews his cud in utter content. There is, doubtless, a vast joy, an immeasurable, blissful content in the animal creation that seems to mock the inseparable* woe of humanity. Their almost perfect health, their harmonious adjustment to their surroundings, their entire oneness with their world and their kind, must yield a joy nearly perfect in its kind. A bird's song, a child's laugh- ter, are simply the expression of joy in bare exist- ence. But a man soon gets beyond the state when he can say, " It is enough to live, to eat and drink and sleep and dwell at peace with my kind." There are indeed moments when the cup of life overflows; days in June when heaven and earth draw so near together that the rapture of both fills 94 GOD OUE BEWABD. the heart, and one is forced to cry with the poet : " O God, I thank thee that I live." There are mo- ments also when love so overwhelms the other fao- ulties that we think not of yesterday or to-morrow, but only of our present perfect bliss, as when words of plighting troth have been uttered, or, in some tenderer moment, a father takes his prattling child on his knee, and in the unutterable outgoing of his love, catches a glimpse of how God loves, and why,
 
loving so. He dwells in infinite repose. But such moments are transient, bits of eternity unduly real- ized, chance foretastes of what shall be when that which is perfect is come. The law of our condition soon reasserts itself ; the ecstasy of eternity passes, and time resumes its sway over us, time that gives us nothing because it has itself no existence, and can only promise us something in the future, crying as it flies past on its swift wings : " to-morrow and to-morrow ! " This great figure standing in front of the mists of antiquity, the first man with clear heavens above him, outlined our leading relations to life and to God. He had in some way, it matters not how, got a clear sight of God, and it worked upon him in a legitimate way : it awed and commanded him, and drew him out of himself toward God, so that God was more to him than his child ; for it is in the nature of God and of man, that God should be more to man than his child, even his only child. And having such sight of God, he has like faith in Him, a vast, all mastering, all possessing faith answering all the ends of righteousness, nay, it is righteous- GOD OUR REWARD. 95 ness. What is external righteousness, — the petty details of doing, or not doing, — to this passionate, immeasurable loyalty of faith? The faith itself sweeps to the outermost skirts of conduct and in- fuses its devotion into every act and feeling. Here, in such a faith as this, not in any legal posturings and formal coming and going, is found the true phi- losophy of life. ow, what shall God do for a man, how deal with one who trusts him in this way ? He will be his shield, will protect him against the world and mischance and his own finiteness. And he will

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