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On the Reception of New Truth.

On the Reception of New Truth.

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Published by glennpease
By T. T. Munger.


" Never forget to tell the young people f ranklj' that they are to expect
more light and larger developments of the truth which you give them.
Oh, the souls which have been made skeptical by the mere clamoring of
new truth to add itself to that which they have been taught to think fin-
ished and final ! " — Rev. Phillips Brooks, Yale Lectures.
By T. T. Munger.


" Never forget to tell the young people f ranklj' that they are to expect
more light and larger developments of the truth which you give them.
Oh, the souls which have been made skeptical by the mere clamoring of
new truth to add itself to that which they have been taught to think fin-
ished and final ! " — Rev. Phillips Brooks, Yale Lectures.

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Published by: glennpease on Jun 11, 2014
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O THE RECEPTIO OF EW TRUTH. By T. T. Munger. " ever forget to tell the young people f ranklj' that they are to expect more light and larger developments of the truth which you give them. Oh, the souls which have been made skeptical by the mere clamoring of new truth to add itself to that which they have been taught to think fin- ished and final ! " — Rev. Phillips Brooks, Yale Lectures. " Infidelity is the ultimate result of checking the desire for expanded knowledge." — Edwards A. Park, D. D. '' In the Bible there is more iYidXJinds me than I have experienced in all other books put together; the words of the Bible find me at greater depths of my being; and whatever finds me brings with it an irresistible evidence of its having proceeded from the Holy Spirit." — Coleridge. '*The soul once brought into inner and immediate contact with a divine power and life is never left to itself." — J. Lewis Diman, D. D., Sermon o* VL O THE RECEPTIO OP EW TRUTH. "And Peter opened bis mouth, and said, Of a truth I perceive that God is no respecter of persons: but in every nation, he that fearetli liim and worketh righteousness, is acceptable to him." — Tiijs Acts x. 34, 85. If we were to take this book of the Acts, and put it off at a little distance, so as to get its outline as a whole, and its trend, we should find thut its main purpose is to unfold the broadening spirit and form of the church of God.
 
It is a history of transition. On its first page the Christ ascends, and is no more contained in Judea. As the heavens, into which He rises, over- arch the whole world, so his gospel begins to spread its wings for its world-wide flight. Soon the Spirit  — universal as the "casing air" — breathes upon the Apostles, and they begin to act under an in- spiration as free and wide as tho wind that typi- fies it. On every page some barrier gives way ; with every line the horizon broadens ; one province after another is brought within the circle of the ex- panding faith, till at last Corinth and Athens and Rome are found playing their parts in this divine, world-wide drama. There is in this book of the Acts, as in Homer, and in all great histories, a wonderful sense of motion. One feels as if sailing 48 O THE RECEPTIO OF EW TRUTH. in a great ship, under a bounding breeze, out of a narrow harbor into the wide sea ; every moment the shores withdraw, and the waters broaden, and the winds blow freer, till at last we get room to turn our prow whichever way we will. So in read- ing this history, it is no longer Judea, but the world ; no longer Jerusalem, but Rome and Spain also ; no more one chosen people, but all nations. Every- where the Spirit is seeking worshipers ; the bud of divine promise has opened, and its perfume iills the world. With this change of scene there is corresponding change of personal attitude ; conversions not only in character, but in opinion ; it is a record not only of repenting and turning, but of broadening. For conversion does not necessarily enlarge a man ; it may simply turn him in another direction. It is possible to come out of evil into good, and yet re-
 
main under intellectual conceptions that dwarf and restrain one. There is a broad world-wisdom that often runs along with a worldly life, that tnay be lost if the better life is held under narrow concep- tions, so that while the change may be a gain mor- ally it is a loss intellectually ; a process that has had illustration from the first until now, — in the proselytes whom St. Paul found it so hard to teach the distinction between the letter and the spirit, and in those of to-day who fail to distinguish be- tween conduct and character, between dogma and life, between the form and the substance of the Faith. Valuable as this book of the Acts is as a record of events, and as the neocuB between the Dia< O THE RECEPTIO OP EW TRUTH. 49 pensations, it is more valuable as introducing the life of the Spirit, and as showing how the faith of ages develops into liberty and the full life and thought of humanity. Here we have the full reve- lation of God evoking the full life of man. The incident before us is a happy illustration of this, — a minute and graphic history of the experi^ ence of a Roman centurion ; a history priceless in its assurance of possible sainthood outside of the church, yet showing its hard conditions : telling us how his devout aspirations carried him into the realm of vision, and drew him towards the faith that was more than his, and brought upon him an inspiration greater than any that came upon his blind yearnings after righteousness. Here also is a somewhat similar experience of Peter, matching and rounding that of Cornelius ; for God is teach- ing them both, drawing them off into the realm of vision, where they can be more effectually moulded to the divine uses. Sleep is not vacant of spirit-

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