Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
22Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Vector Algebra

Vector Algebra

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,337|Likes:
Published by bsnchaitanya

More info:

Published by: bsnchaitanya on Nov 23, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/18/2013

pdf

text

original

 
1
CHAPTER
 – 
IVECTOR ALGEBRA
INTRODUCTION:
Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Theory is often called Electromagnetics. It is asubject which deals with electric field, magnetic field and also electromagnetic fields andphenomena.EMF Theory is essential to analyze and design all communication and radarsystems. Infact, it is also used in Bio-Systems and in this context it is called Bio-Electromagnetics. Source of electromagnetic field is electric charges: either at rest or inmotion. However an electromagnetic field may cause a redistribution of charges that inturn change the field and hence the separation of cause and effect is not always visible.
APPLICATIONS OF EMF THEORY:
1. Communication Systems.Wireless CommunicationSatellite CommunicationTV CommunicationCellular CommunicationMobile CommunicationMicrowave CommunicationFibre-Optic Communication.2. Electrical MachinesElectro mechanical Energy conversion systems.Electrical MotorsTransformersElectrical Relays3. RadarsSpeed-trap radarsWeather forecast radarsRemote sensing radarsRadio astronomy radarsMeteorological radars4. IndustriesInduction heatingMelting and forgingSurface hardeningAnnealingSolderingDielectric heating5. All types of antenna analysis and design.6. All types of transmission lines and wave guides.The analysis and design of a system, device or circuit requires the use of sometheory or the other.
 
2The
analysis
of a system is universally defined as
one by which the output isobtained from the given input and system details.
The
design
of a system is
one by which the system details are obtained from thegiven input and output.
These two important tasks of analysis and design are executed by two mostpopular theories, namely,
CIRCUIT 
 
and
 ELECTROMAGNETIC 
 
theories.
COMPARISON OF CIRCUIT AND ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THEORIESSl.No. Circuit Theory EMF Theory
1 Deals with Voltage (V) andCurrent (I).Deals with Electric (
E
) and Magnetic (
H
)fields.2 V and I are scalars.
E
and
H
are vectors.3 V and I are functions of time (t).
E
and
H
are functions of time (t) and spacevariables (x, y, z) or (
ρ, φ, z
) or (r
, θ, φ
).4 Radiation effects are neglected. Radiation effects can be considered.5 Circuit theory cannot be used toanalyze or design a completecommunication system.Field theory can be used where circuittheory fails to hold good for the analysisand design of a communication system.6 It is useful at low frequencies. It is useful at all frequencies, particularly athigh frequencies.7 At low frequencies the length oconnecting wires is very muchsmaller than
λ.
 At high frequencies the length of connecting components are of the order of 
λ.
 8 Cannot be applied in free space. Is applicable in free space.9 Using circuit theory, transmitterand receiver circuits can beanalyzed and designed. But itcannot be used to design oranalyze a medium like freespace.Using field theory, the medium can also beanalyzed and designed.10
Basic laws are Ohm’s law andKirchhoff’s
law.
Basic laws are Coulomb’s law, Gauss’slaw, Ampere’s circuit law.
 11 Basic theorems are The
venin’s, Norton’s
, Reciprocity,Superposition, Maximum powertransfer theorems.Basic theorems are Reciprocity, Helmholtz,
Stoke’s, Divergence and Poynting
theorems.12 Basic equations are Mesh/Loopequations.Basic equations are Maxwell, Poisson,Laplace and Wave.
 
3
VECTOR ANALYSIS:
The analysis and design of a system or device is impossible without mathematics.Mathematics is the backbone of science and engineering. For all analytical orcomputational purposes, mathematical background is essential. Mathematical modelingof systems is a common practice.Vector analysis is a mathematical tool with which EM concepts are mostconveniently expressed and best comprehended. Vectors are introduced in physics andmathematics, primarily in the Cartesian coordinate system. Although Cylindricalcoordinates are found in Calculus texts, the spherical coordinate system is seldom used.All three coordinate systems must be used in electromagnetics.A quantity can either be a
Scalar
or
Vector.
The term
 scalar
refers to a quantity whose value may be represented by a singlepositive or negative real number. In other words, a scalar is a quantity that has onlymagnitude. The x, y, z we speak in basic algebra are scalars and the quantities theyrepresent are scalars.Quantities such as time, mass, distance, temperature, entropy, electric potentialand population are scalars. Voltage is also a scalar quantity, although the complexrepresentation of a sinusoidal voltage, an artificial procedure, produces a
complex scalar,
 or
 phasor 
, which requires two real numbers for its representation such as
amplitude
and
 phase angle,
or
real part 
and
imaginary part.
 A
vector
quantity has both magnitude and direction. We shall be concerned withonly two and three
 – 
dimensional spaces, but vectors are defined in n - dimensional spacein more advanced applications.Force, velocity, acceleration, electric field intensity and a straight line from thepositive to the negative terminal of a storage battery are examples of vectors. Eachquantity is characterized by both magnitude and direction.There is other class of physical quantities called
Tensors
: where magnitude anddirection vary with coordinate axes.To distinguish between a scalar and a vector, it is customary to represent a vectorby a letter with an arrow on top of it, such as
Ā or Ē
, or by a letter in boldface type suchas
A
and
B.
A scalar is represented simply by a letter
 – 
e.g. A, B, U and V.EM theory is essentially a study of some particular
 fields.
 A
 field 
may be defined mathematically as
some function of a vector which connects anarbitrary origin to a general point in space.
Field concept is invariably related to aregion. It is possible to associate some physical effect with a field, such as the force on a
compass needle in the earth’s magnetic field or the movement of smoke particles in the
field defined by the vector velocity of air in some region of space.Both
 scalar fields
 
and
vector fields
exist. The temperature throughout the bowl of a soup, the density at any point in the earth, sound intensity in a theatre, electric potentialin a region and refractive index of a stratified medium are examples of scalar fields. Thegravitational and magnetic fields of the earth, the voltage gradient in a cable, thetemperature gradient in a soldering
 – 
iron tip and velocity of rain drops in the atmosphereare examples of vector fields. The value of a field varies in general with both position andtime.

Activity (22)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Neelam Kapoor liked this
Jacob Lancaster liked this
leonardus00 liked this
iamss9 liked this
kamikyou liked this
delta2010 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->