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Moses Declining the Commission Given Him.

Moses Declining the Commission Given Him.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M.A.


Exod. iv. 10 — 14. And Moses said unto the Lord, my Lord,
I am not eloquent, neither heretofore, nor since thou hast
spoken unto thy servant .• hut I am slow of speech, and of a
slow tongue. And the Lord said unto him, JVho hath made
man's mouth P or who maketh the dumb, or deaf, or the
seeing, or the blind P have not I the Lord P Now therefore
go ; and I will be with thy mouth, and teach thee what thou
shalt say. Aiid he said, my Lord, send, I pray thee, by
the hand of him whom thou wilt send. And the anger of the
Lord was kindled against Moses.
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M.A.


Exod. iv. 10 — 14. And Moses said unto the Lord, my Lord,
I am not eloquent, neither heretofore, nor since thou hast
spoken unto thy servant .• hut I am slow of speech, and of a
slow tongue. And the Lord said unto him, JVho hath made
man's mouth P or who maketh the dumb, or deaf, or the
seeing, or the blind P have not I the Lord P Now therefore
go ; and I will be with thy mouth, and teach thee what thou
shalt say. Aiid he said, my Lord, send, I pray thee, by
the hand of him whom thou wilt send. And the anger of the
Lord was kindled against Moses.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jun 15, 2014
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MOSES DECLIIG THE COMMISSIO GIVE HIM. BY REV. C. SIMEO, M.A. Exod. iv. 10 — 14. And Moses said unto the Lord, my Lord, I am not eloquent, neither heretofore, nor since thou hast spoken unto thy servant .• hut I am slow of speech, and of a slow tongue. And the Lord said unto him, JVho hath made man's mouth P or who maketh the dumb, or deaf, or the seeing, or the blind P have not I the Lord P ow therefore go ; and I will be with thy mouth, and teach thee what thou shalt say. Aiid he said, my Lord, send, I pray thee, by the hand of him whom thou wilt send. And the anger of the Lord was kindled against Moses. THAT iniquity should prevail among the blind and ignorant, is no more than might reasonably be expected: but when we behold it in the most eminent saints, we are ready to exclaim, " Lord, what is man, that thou art mindful of him, "and the son of man, that thou so regardest him ?" It should seem indeed that God has determined to stain the pride of human glory, by recording the faults of his most favoured servants. It is remarkable that those who are most noted in Scripture for their piety, not only fell, but manifested their weakness in those very graces for which they were most distinguished, Abraham yielded to unbelief. Job to impatience, Moses to anger, Peter to fear. The circumstances here related concerning Moses, clearly shew, not only what Moses was, but what human na- ture is, when put to the trial. The following obser- vations therefore, while they elucidate the text, will lead us to behold our own faces as in a glass. I. There is in man a backwardness to engage in God's service- — [Who was this man ? Moses, in some respects the most pious of mankind. What was the service to which he was called? The most honourable and beneficial that could possibly be
 
assigned 48.] MOSES DECLIIG GOD's COMMISSIO. 267 assigned him Yet, with a pertinacity truly surprising, he persisted in declining it, and desired that any one might be em- ployed in it rather than he*. We, it is true, are called to no such service. But is there no work committed to us ? Has not God appeared to us in his word, and commanded us to devote ourselves to his service ? Has not the Saviour bidden us to *' deny ourselves, and take up our cross daily, and follow him ?" And have we not shewn an utter aver- sion to obey his call ? Glorious as his service is, have we not de- clined it ; and, like Moses, been more studious of our own ease than either of God's honour, or the benefit of our fellow-crea- tures ? Because we have foreseen difficulties, we have been un- willing to embark in the cause of God and of our own souls ; when we ought rather to have gloried in enduring hardships for God, and closed with the proposal at once, saying, " Here am I, Lord ; send me''."] II. We are prone to cloke this backwardness with vain excuses — [Moses would not in plain terms refuse to obey his God ; but he tried by every method to excuse himself from undertaking the office assigned him. He first pretends to decline through mo- desty "^ : and we might have given him credit for real humility, if his subsequent refusals had not shewn that he was actuated by a far different principle. When God has obviated all objections arising from his unworthiness, then, in direct opposition to God's promise, he objects, that the people will not believe his message"^. To remove all apprehensions on this ground, God works three miracles before him, and commissions him to perform the same in the sight of Pharaoh ' and the people of Israel ^. Still averse to engage in this work, he pleads his want of eloquence, and his consequent unfitness for such an undertaking ^ To obviate this,
 
God asks him, " Who made man's mouth ;" and whether He who had given him the faculty of speech, was not able to give effect to his endeavours ? Yea, he promises to " be with him, and to teach him what he shall say." And does not all this overcome his reluctance ? o : he still declines the service, and begs that God would employ any other person rather than himself. ow we say that these were vain excuses : for the real prin- ciples by which he was actuated, were unbelief and cowardice. He had failed in this attempt forty years before, when he had run unsent, and acted in his ovvn strength, and striven for the victory with no other than carnal weapons ; and now he is apprehensive of another failure, when expressly sent, and furnished with a wonder-working rod, and assured of success by a God of almighty * ver. 13, '' Isai. vi. 8. ' Ex. ill. 11. ^ Compare Ex. iii. IS. with iv, i. * ver. 2 — 9. f The text. ^GS Exopus, IV. 10 — 14. [48. almighty power and unimpeachable veracity. Moreover, as on the former occasion Pharaoh sought his life, he is afraid to put himself within his reach, lest he should execute his threats upon hims. . And what are the pleas whereby we attempt to justify or exte- nuate our neglect of God ? Have they any solidity ? yea, have they any foundation in truth ? Are they not mere excuses ? and is not an aversion to the service to which we are called, the true reason of our declining to engage in it ? We will not say in plain words, *' I hate God ; I hate religion ; I am determined never to follow the Saviour's steps :" but we pretend that this is not a convenient season, or that the work to which we are called is

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