Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
SBA List v Driehaus Ruling

SBA List v Driehaus Ruling

Ratings:
(0)
|Views: 1,692|Likes:
Published by COAST
Unanimous decision, authored by Clarence Thomas, gives COAST a victory at the U.S. Supreme Court against the Ohio Elections Commission.
Unanimous decision, authored by Clarence Thomas, gives COAST a victory at the U.S. Supreme Court against the Ohio Elections Commission.

More info:

Published by: COAST on Jun 16, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/04/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 
1
(Slip Opinion)
OCTOBER TERM, 2013 Syllabus
NOTE: Where it is feasible, a syllabus (headnote) will be released, as isbeing done in connection with this case, at the time the opinion is issued.The syllabus constitutes no part of the opinion of the Court but has beenprepared by the Reporter of Decisions for the convenience of the reader. See
United States
 v.
 Detroit Timber & Lumber Co.,
 200 U. S. 321, 337.
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
Syllabus
SUSAN B. ANTHONY LIST
ET AL
.
v
. DRIEHAUS
ET AL
.
CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SIXTH CIRCUIT No. 13–193. Argued April 22, 2014—Decided June 16, 2014 Respondent Driehaus, a former Congressman, filed a complaint withthe Ohio Elections Commission alleging that petitioner Susan B. An-thony List (SBA) violated an Ohio law that criminalizes certain falsestatements made during the course of a political campaign. Specifi-cally, Driehaus alleged that SBA violated the law when it stated that his vote for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA)was a vote in favor of “taxpayer funded abortion.” After Driehaus lost his re-election bid, the complaint was dismissed, but SBA contin-ued to pursue a separate suit in Federal District Court challenging the law on First Amendment grounds. Petitioner Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST) also filed a First Amendment challenge to the Ohio law, alleging that it had planned to disseminate materials presenting a similar message but refrained due to the proceedings against SBA. The District Court consolidated the two lawsuits and dismissed them as nonjusticiable, concluding that neither suit presented a sufficiently concrete injury for purposesof standing or ripeness. The Sixth Circuit affirmed on ripeness grounds.
Held
: Petitioners have alleged a sufficiently imminent injury for ArticleIII purposes. Pp. 7–18.(a) To establish Article III standing, a plaintiff must show,
inter alia
, an “injury in fact,” which must be “concrete and particularized”and “actual or imminent, not ‘conjectural’ or ‘hypothetical.’ ”
Lujan
 v.
 Defenders of Wildlife
, 504 U. S. 555, 560. When challenging a law prior to its enforcement, a plaintiff satisfies the injury-in-fact re-quirement where he alleges “an intention to engage in a course of conduct arguably affected with a constitutional interest, but pro-scribed by a statute, and there exists a credible threat of prosecution
 
 
2 SUSAN B. ANTHONY LIST
v.
 DRIEHAUS Syllabus thereunder.”
 Babbitt
 v.
Farm Workers
, 442 U. S. 289, 298. Pp. 7–11.(b) Petitioners have alleged a credible threat of enforcement of theOhio law. Pp. 11–17.(1) Petitioners have alleged “an intention to engage in a course of conduct arguably affected with a constitutional interest” by pleadingspecific statements they intend to make in future election cycles. Pp. 11–12. (2) Petitioners’ intended future conduct is also “arguably . . . pro-scribed by [the] statute.” The Ohio false statement statute sweeps broadly, and a panel of the Ohio Elections Commission already found probable cause to believe that SBA violated the law when it madestatements similar to those petitioners plan to make in the future.
Golden
 v.
Zwickler
, 394 U. S. 103, is distinguishable; the threat of prosecution under an electoral leafletting ban in that case was whollyconjectural because the plaintiff’s “sole concern” related to a formerCongressman who was unlikely to run for office again. Here, by con-trast, petitioners’ speech focuses on the broader issue of support forthe ACA, not on the voting record of a single candidate. Nor does SBA’s insistence that its previous statements were true render itsfears of enforcement misplaced. After all, that insistence did not pre-vent the Commission from finding probable cause for a violation thefirst time. Pp. 12–13. (3) Finally, the threat of future enforcement is substantial. There is a history of past enforcement against petitioners. Past en-forcement against the same conduct is good evidence that the threatof enforcement is not ‘chimerical.’
Steffel
 v.
Thompson
, 415 U. S. 452, 459. The credibility of that threat is bolstered by the fact that acomplaint may be filed with the State Commission by “any person,” Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §3517.153(A), not just a prosecutor or agency. The threatened Commission proceedings are of particular concern because of the burden they impose on electoral speech. Moreover, the target of a complaint may be forced to divert significant time and re-sources to hire legal counsel and respond to discovery requests in the crucial days before an election. But this Court need not decide whether the threat of Commission proceedings standing alone is suf-ficient; here, those proceedings are backed by the additional threat of criminal prosecution. Pp. 14–17.(c) The Sixth Circuit separately considered two other “prudential factors”: “fitness” and “hardship.This Court need not resolve the continuing vitality of the prudential ripeness doctrine in this case be-cause those factors are easily satisfied here. See
Lexmark Int’l, Inc.
v.
Static Control Components, Inc.
, 572 U. S. ___. Pp. 17–18. 525 Fed. Appx. 415, reversed and remanded. T
HOMAS
, J., delivered the opinion for a unanimous Court.
 
 
 _________________  _________________
1 Cite as: 573 U. S. ____ (2014) Opinion of the Court
NOTICE: This opinion is subject to formal revision before publication in thepreliminary print of the United States Reports. Readers are requested tonotify the Reporter of Decisions, Supreme Court of the United States, Wash-ington, D. C. 20543, of any typographical or other formal errors, in orderthat corrections may be made before the preliminary print goes to press.
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
No. 13–193
SUSAN B. ANTHONY LIST,
 ET AL
., PETITIONERS
v.
 
STEVEN DRIEHAUS
 ET AL
.
ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF  APPEALS FOR THE SIXTH CIRCUIT
 
[June 16, 2014]
J
USTICE
T
HOMAS
 delivered the opinion of the Court. Petitioners in this case seek to challenge an Ohio stat-ute that prohibits certain “false statements” during thecourse of a political campaign. The question in this caseis whether their preenforcement challenge to that law is  justiciable—and in particular, whether they have alleged asufficiently imminent injury for the purposes of Article III. We conclude that they have. I The Ohio statute at issue prohibits certain “false state-ment[s]” “during the course of any campaign for nomina-tion or election to public office or office of a political party.” Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §3517.21(B) (Lexis 2013). As rele-vant here, the statute makes it a crime for any person to“[m]ake a false statement concerning the voting record of a candidate or public official,” §3517.21(B)(9), or to “[p]ost,publish, circulate, distribute, or otherwise disseminate a false statement concerning a candidate, either knowing the same to be false or with reckless disregard of whether

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->