Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
the_news_leader_20140616_A01_A02

the_news_leader_20140616_A01_A02

Ratings: (0)|Views: 7|Likes:
Published by Laura Peters

More info:

Published by: Laura Peters on Jun 16, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/16/2014

pdf

text

original

 
SWOOPE
W
henDentonLaymanandhiswife, Virginia, entered theold Glebe Schoolhouse onSundayafternoon,itwaslikesteppingbackintime.TheLaymansoncelivedonanear-byfarmandspenttheirfirstyearsoftheirmarriagethere.ItwasjusthappenstancethatDen-tonLaymanwastalkingabouthisdogtags a few weeks back. He wonderedwheretheycouldbeandhowlongagohe’dlostthem.Standingintheplacewhereonetagwas discovered just weeks ago, by atotal stranger, Denton Layman nowholdswhathehadoncelost.
Thediscovery
The schoolhouse, which was builtthe mid-1800s, is being renovated byDr.RobertCocke,anemergencyroom
CONNECTION
TOHISPAST
Denton Layman, whose dog tag had been lost under the floorboards of the Glebe Schoolhouse since the1950s, stands inthe room where it was found holding a portrait of himself from his service in the military on Sunday in Swoope.
GRIFFINMOORES/THE NEWS LEADER
Denton Layman on Sunday holds his dog tag, which was discoveredunder the floorboards of the Glebe Schoolhouse in Swoope.
GRIFFINMOORES/THE NEWS LEADER
Dog tag recovered in old schoolhouse returned to WWII veteran
ByLauraPeters
lpeters@newsleader.com
SeeTAG,PageA2
MONDAY, JUNE16, 2014 WWW.NEWSLEADER.COM
PROUDLY SERVING OUR COMMUNITY FOR107 YEARSSTAUNTON, WAYNESBORO & AUGUSTA CO., VA.
VOL.124, NO.167 • COPYRIGHT 2014 • $1RETAIL • FOR HOME DELIVERY PRICING,SEE INSIDE
Johnson takes checkersin Michigan
 » B1
ADVICE
 B6
NATION/WORLD
 B4
COMICS
 B5
DEATHS
 A4
LOCAL
 A3
LOTTERY
 A2
ANALYSIS
 A5
SPORTS
 B1-B3
TV GRID
 B6WEATHER89
 ●
64
T-STORMS
      N      V   -      0      0      0      0      1      6      7      2      8      5
STAUNTON
Karen Lawrence spentmuch of her time living in downtownwithout the capability to wash and dryherclothes.“I live and work downtown, and forseveral years did not have easy accesstoalaundromat,”Lawrencesaid.“Someoftheapartmentsinolderbuildingsaresmall and not able to be fitted for ma-chines.”Lawrence’s apartment house has in-stalled a shared laundry room, but adowntownlaundromathasalwaysbeena topic for discussion between resi-dents.Lawrence,priortohavinglaundryinherbuilding,talkedwithotherresidentsaboutopeningasmallcooperativelaun-dromat, something like the Dirty Bean— a combination coffee shop and laun-dromatthatusedtobeinNewtown.Will Wright, who ran the Dirty Beanback in 2008, said what he had was agreatconcept,buthorribletiming.“The issue with it was we were hav-ing slow progression, but it was a littletoolate,”hesaid.“Itneededtobealittlemoreaggressive.”Around 2008, right around the realestate slump and economic downturn,WrightputintheDirtyBeanwhereBar-biere is now on West Beverley Street.Theventureonlylastedayear.“I do think there is some room forwalkable services like a laundromatdowntown,butitwouldhavetobecom-binedwithsomethingelsetobeanactu-albusiness,Lawrencesaid.Julie Markowitz, executive directorof Staunton Downtown DevelopmentAssociation,saidhavingsomethingliketheDirtyBeannowwouldthrivedown-town.Wright agreed with that concept,
Terry Davis of Staunton loads wet clothesfrom the cart into three dryers at LaundryLand in Staunton on Jan. 23.
MIKE TRIPP/THENEWS LEADER
Downtownlaundromatcould bean option
ByLauraPeters
lpeters@newsleader.com
SeeLAUNDRY,PageA2
WASHINGTON
 From theRoseGarden,PresidentBarackObama outlined a timetable forthe gradual withdrawal of thelast U.S. troops in Afghanistanand said confidently, “This ishow wars end in the 21st centu-ry.”Butlessthanthreeweeksaf-ter his May 27 announcement,thereisasuddenburstofuncer-tainty surrounding the wayObama has moved to bring thetwo conflicts he inherited to aclose.InIraq,afast-movingIslam-ic insurgency is pressing to-ward Baghdad, raising the pos-sibility of fresh American mili-taryactionmorethantwoyearsafter the last U.S. troops with-drew. The chaos in Iraq alsoraises questions about whetherObama’s plans to keep a smallmilitary presence in Afghani-stan until the end of 2016 canprevent a similar backslidethereorwhetherextremistsaresimply lying in wait until theU.S. withdrawal deadlinepasses.“Could all of this have beenavoided? The answer is abso-lutely yes,” Sen. John McCain,R-Ariz., said of the deteriorat-ing situation in Iraq. McCain,Obama’s 2008 presidential ri-val,addedthatObamais“abouttomakethesamemistakeinAf-ghanistanhemadeinIraq.”That criticism strikes at theheart of Obama’s clearest for-eign policy pledge: a commit-menttoendingtheconflictsandkeeping the U.S. out of furthermilitaryentanglements.
For Obama, fresh questions about how wars end
ByJuliePace
Associated Press
President Barack Obama and his top advisers have cited the end of theIraq war as one of Obama’s top achievements in office.
SUSAN WALSH/AP
“I think Americans have learned that it’s harder to end wars than it is to begin them.” 
PRESIDENTBARACKOBAMA
SeeWAR,PageA2

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->