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Public Administration

Public Administration

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Published by reslazaro
A four point analysis on Steve Spielberg's 2012 film "Lincoln", grounded on perspectives on Public Administrative theories that aim to gauge the political and Public Administrative ramifications that are within the historical context of the film but firmly and soundly resonate even in contemporary settings of public policy and governance.
A four point analysis on Steve Spielberg's 2012 film "Lincoln", grounded on perspectives on Public Administrative theories that aim to gauge the political and Public Administrative ramifications that are within the historical context of the film but firmly and soundly resonate even in contemporary settings of public policy and governance.

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Published by: reslazaro on Jun 16, 2014
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Lincoln’s Democracy 
: A Four Point Analysis on the Spielberg’s
Lincoln 
 through the Lens of Contemporary Public Administrative Theories
1. The main conflict of
Lincoln
 is centered on the main predicament of the period in which it is set which is the passing of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America which would abolish slavery and involuntary servitude in all areas of the United States. This amendment would guarantee the freedom of all slaves still held in involuntary service in any state recognizing the authority of the Federal government. This amendment follows the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 which officially freed all slaves in the
“rebelling states” that would soon be the components of the Confederate States
of America. This proclamation was passed as a war measure and instated through executive powers in the form of an Executive Order with Lincoln acting as commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces. Because of these characteristics of the Proclamation, Lincoln felt that it would be insufficient in achieving the grander political goal of abolishing slavery in America. The proclamation was vulnerable to being junked by US courts after the state of war and it was also lacking in the sense that it did not encompass all territories of the United States. Thus, the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment was essential in
attaining Lincoln’s ultimate goal.
 2. There were several obstacles to the resolution of this conflict. One main problem was the possibility of the Amendment being defeated in the House by representatives of returning slave states if the Amendment were to be passed after the end of the war. Because of this, Lincoln rushed the passage since the
 
end of the war was already seen as looming. The idea of victory as a close eventuality also brought hesitance upon several representatives of the Union because they saw that the assurance of victory over the Confederacy should be the priority. Another problem is the lack of unity of the Republican Party in terms of when the Amendment should be passed and over the finer, more contentious details that it proposes. To solve this, Lincoln called upon Francis Preston Blair, founder of the Republican Party, for support. In exchange for his support, Lincoln approved the sending of a delegation for negotiations for peace between the two sides which was contentious among the Radical Republicans because of their adamant opposition to negotiations. Also, the support of the Democratic Party was also necessary in ensuring the majority vote for the passage of the amendment. 3. To solve the problem of the Amendment being defeated by representatives of returning slave states, Lincoln and his administration and his supporters rushed the passage of the Amendment. For this to be done, they employed a strategy of dealing with both internal and external problems, i.e., hindrances to the amendment internally among members of the Republican Party and externally
among members of the Democratic Party. Externally, they targeted the “lame duck” Democrats, those who have failed to be reelected, by offering them Federal positions in Lincoln’s next term. This was achieved through indirect
means by use of agents that would secretly strike deals with these representatives. Internally, Lincoln sought to unify the Republican Party by seeking the support of party founder Francis Preston Blair. As a condition, however, Blair wanted the go-signal from Lincoln to start negotiations with the

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