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P. 1
Nathan's Parable

Nathan's Parable

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M.A.


Sam. xii. 1 — 7. And the Lord sent Nathaii unto David.
And he came unto him, and said unto him, There were two
men in one city ; the one rich, and the other poor. The rich
man had exceeding many flocks and herds ; hut the poor man
had nothing save one little ewe-lamb, iihich he had bought,
and nourished up ; and it ^rew up together with him and with
his children : it did eat oj his own meat, and drank of his own
cupf and lay in his bosom, and was unto him as a daughter.
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M.A.


Sam. xii. 1 — 7. And the Lord sent Nathaii unto David.
And he came unto him, and said unto him, There were two
men in one city ; the one rich, and the other poor. The rich
man had exceeding many flocks and herds ; hut the poor man
had nothing save one little ewe-lamb, iihich he had bought,
and nourished up ; and it ^rew up together with him and with
his children : it did eat oj his own meat, and drank of his own
cupf and lay in his bosom, and was unto him as a daughter.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jun 17, 2014
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ATHA'S PARABLEBY REV. C. SIMEO, M.A. Sam. xii. 1 — 7. And the Lord sent athaii unto David. And he came unto him, and said unto him, There were two men in one city ; the one rich, and the other poor. The rich man had exceeding many flocks and herds ; hut the poor man had nothing save one little ewe-lamb, iihich he had bought, and nourished up ; and it ^rew up together with him and with his children : it did eat oj his own meat, and drank of his own cupf and lay in his bosom, and was unto him as a daughter. And 598 2 SAMUEL, XII. 1 — 7, [210. And there came a traveller unto the rich man ; ami he spared to take of his own flock, and of his oivn herd, to dress far the uay-faring inan that was come unto him ; but took the poor mails lamb, and dressed it for the man that was cnme unto him. And David's ancrer was greatly kindled against the man ; and he said to athan, As the Lord liveth, the man that hath done this thing shall surely die : and he shall restore the lamb four-fold, because he did this thing, and because he had no pity. And athan said unto DJvid^ Thou art the man. GOD, in the disposal of his gifts, does not con- duct himself by any such laws as are necessary for the regulation of human actions. He is a Sovereign ? who may deal with his creatures as he pleases, without " giving account to ys of any of his matters." Accordingly we find that sometimes he has exercised a severity beyond what we, with our limited appre- hensions, might have expected : and at other times he has shewn mercy, where we could have expected
 
nothing but the heaviest judgments. We have lately seen him striking Uzzah dead for a well-meant error, and taking the kingdom from Saul for not waiting quite so long for Samuel as he should have done : but in our text we behold him sending a prophet unto David to bring him to repentance, after the commission of such crimes as cannot be contemplated without horror and amazement. But '* His ways are not as our ways, nor his thoughts as our thoughts." The conduct of David as portrayed in our text, together with the means used by athan to humble him for it, lead us to shew, I. To what an awful extent a man's conscience may be seared — • We read of persons whose " consciences are seared as with an hot iron^:" and such was now the state of David — [One wQuKl have supppscd that, after the commission of afliiltery with Baihsheba, he would have been scarcely able to endure his existence through the agonies of his mind : but he was only concerned alwut conceaJing it from man : accordingly, on finding that ijqr pregnancy niubt of necessity lead to a, disco- very • I Tim, iv. 2, 210.] AtHA's PARABLE. 69P Very of the crimiB, he adopted various means to deceive Uriah ; and when he did not succeed in them, he sent an order to Joab to expose, and to desert, liim in battle, so as to insure his death by ihe hands of the enemy. Would one not suppose that such complicated crimes as these should awaken him ? Yet behold foi- nine or ten months he was, as far as aj)pears to us, altogether insensible of his guilt.
 
At the same time he was quick-sighted enough to the crimes of others, and severe in the extreme against the man, whom athan represented as oppressively taking the favourite lamb of a poor neighbour in preference to one out of his own flock : he deemed that man to be worthy of death, because he had shewn no pity ; and adjudged him to pay four-fold for the injury he had committed. Who can reflect on this without utter astonishrrient ? That so holy a man as David, who had been so honoured of the Lord, and had done so much for the honour of his God, should be left to fall in so grievous a manner, and to lie for so long a time impenitent in his sins ! Who can look upon it, and not weep for him ? Who can look upon it, and not tremble for himself?] But awful as this state of mind appears, it is, alas ! too common in this world — [Such enormous crimes indeed as those of David are not comtnon : but vvho has not committed some evils which ought to have humbled him in the dust before God ? yet who has not continued months, and even years, without ever abasing himself with humiliation and contrition ? Who has not shewn a strange insensibility with respect to tlie guilt he has contracted ? We can easily discern the faults of others, and can censure them with severity; but towards our own we are most bhnd and most indulgent. or must we be considered here as referring altogether to those ^ho despise religion : iHs a common evil : it is found even in th^ house of God: there are professors of religion who are as blind to their own sins, as if they never had known what sin was ;_ and who, if their misdeeds are unknown to man, continue for years unhumbled in the sight of God. Yes ; there are too many, who are both blinded and " hardened by the dcceitfulnoss of

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