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Excavate! Dinosaurs: A Sneak Peek

Excavate! Dinosaurs: A Sneak Peek

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Published by Storey Publishing
Unearth your child’s inner paleontologist! Excavate! Dinosaurs, Jon Tennant’s illustrated book of fascinating dinosaur facts and pop-out paper bones, presents a puzzle every budding dino expert, age 7 and up, will love to dig into. Kids begin by learning the habits and anatomies of twelve colorful dinosaurs from the Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic periods before using their newfound knowledge to match a collection of mixed-up bones. They’ll make twelve stand-up skeletons and have hours of educational fun!
Unearth your child’s inner paleontologist! Excavate! Dinosaurs, Jon Tennant’s illustrated book of fascinating dinosaur facts and pop-out paper bones, presents a puzzle every budding dino expert, age 7 and up, will love to dig into. Kids begin by learning the habits and anatomies of twelve colorful dinosaurs from the Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic periods before using their newfound knowledge to match a collection of mixed-up bones. They’ll make twelve stand-up skeletons and have hours of educational fun!

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Storey Publishing on Jun 17, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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07/26/2014

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Contents
It’s your turn to be a paleontologist!
 
4
 What were dinosaurs?
6
 What are fossils?
8
What do paleontologists do?
10
Rebuilding skeletons
12
The Triassic Period
14
The Jurassic Period
 16
The Cretaceous Period
 18Field Guide
 
20
 Ankylosaurus magniventris
22
 Parasaurolophus walkeri
24
Triceratops horridus
26
Tyrannosaurus rex
28
Beipiaosaurus inexpectus
30
 Allosaurus fragilis
32
  Anchiornis huxleyi
34
Stegosaurus stenops
36
Fruitadens haagarorum
38
Giraffatitan brancai
40
Plateosaurus engelhardti
42
 Pisanosaurus mertii
44Dinosaur digs
 
46
Constructing your model dinosaurs
48
Dig site 1: Cretaceous
51
Dig site 2: Jurassic
61
Dig site 3: Triassic
71
 Answers
75
Glossary
79
 Acknowledgments and photo credits
80
Jurassic PeriodCretaceous Period Triassic Period
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 I United States edition published in 2014 by
Storey Publishing
210 MASS MoCA WayNorth Adams, MA 01247
www.storey.com
The mission of Storey Publishing is to serve our customers by publishing practical information that encourages personal independence in harmony with the environment.All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher, except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages or reproduce illustrations in a review with appropriate credits; nor may any part of this book be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or other—without written permission from the publisher.The information in this book is true and complete to the best of our knowledge. All recommendations are made without guarantee on the part of the author or Storey Publishing. The author and publisher disclaim any liability in connection with the use of this information.Storey books are available for special premium and promotional uses and for customized editions. For further information, please call 1-800-793-9396.ISBN: 978–1–61212–520–6Copyright © 2014 Ivy Press LtdThis book was conceived, designed & produced by
Ivy Press
 CREATIVE DIRECTOR
 Peter Bridgewater
COMMISSIONING EDITOR
 Georgia Amson-Bradshaw
MANAGING EDITOR
 Hazel Songhurst
PROJECT EDITOR
 Judith Chamberlain-Webber
ART DIRECTOR
 Kim Hankinson
DESIGNER
 Joanna Clinch
ILLUSTRATORS
Vladimir Nikolov and Charlie Simpson
PAPER ENGINEER
 Charlie Simpson Font credit WC Rhesus I . . ; . . . . . .I: I
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This is a sampling of pages from 
Excavate Dinosaurs!
 © 2014 by Ivy Press Ltd.All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher, except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages or reproduce illustrations in a review with appropriate credits; nor may any part of this book be reproduced, stored in a retrieval.
 
1514
The Triassic (from about 252 to 201 million years ago) was the first period of the Mesozoic Era. During this time, life on Earth was recovering from the largest mass extinction ever at the end of the Permian Period (see page 6).
 THE FIRST DINOSAURS
There were three major dinosaur groups󲀔sauropodomorphs, theropods and ornithischians󲀔all of which first emerged in the Triassic Period. These dinosaurs triumphed over other animals to become the dominant life form on land during the late Triassic and early Jurassic periods.
LIFE IN THE SEA
Meanwhile, in the seas, prehistoric marine reptiles began to evolve, including unusual groups such as nothosaurs, plesiosaurs, ichthyosaurs and thalattosaurs.
Early
 
amphibians
 T ur les
 Therapsids (our mammal-like ancestors)Archosaurs (pterosaurs; crocodiles; dinosaurs; and their descendants, birds)
 The extinc ion is thought to ha ve  been parly aused by the form ation of the supercont inent  Pangaea. All t he exist ing continents c rashed ogether o c reae one giant landass. 
NEW SPECIES
The huge amount of volcanic activity at the end of the Permian Period made life impossible for all but the toughest animals. It took some time after this extinction for life to recover, and this period saw the rise of many new animal groups, including:
 THE
  T RIASSIC 
 PE RIOD
 Thallasiodracon, a plesiosaur
 Th is c rash wou ld ha ve caused  vo lcan ic act i v it y and d istu r bed an y g lo ba l s ystes, such as sea le ve l and c l im ate.
Cymbospondylus, a type of ichthyosaur
PANGAEA
 Theropods, like this Herrerasaurus, were meat-eaters and walked on their  back legs. Ornithischians, such as Pisanosaurus, had beaks and ate plants. Sauropods, like Plateosaurus, had long necks and tails, and small heads.

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