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Naaman Healed of His Leprosy.

Naaman Healed of His Leprosy.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE

BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.



2 Kings. V. 13. And his servants came near, and spake unto
him, and said, My father, if the Prophet had bid thee do
some great thing, ivoiddest ihon ?iot have done it P how
much rather then, tvhen he saith to thee, VFash, and he
clean P

BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.



2 Kings. V. 13. And his servants came near, and spake unto
him, and said, My father, if the Prophet had bid thee do
some great thing, ivoiddest ihon ?iot have done it P how
much rather then, tvhen he saith to thee, VFash, and he
clean P

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jun 18, 2014
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AAMA HEALED OF HIS LEPROSY. BY REV. C. SIMEO, M. A.2 Kings. V. 13. And his servants came near, and spake unto him, and said, My father, if the Prophet had bid thee do some great thing, ivoiddest ihon ?iot have done it P how much rather then, tvhen he saith to thee, VFash, and he clean P ME universally claim a right to "do what they will with their own ;" but they are extremely averse to concede that right to God. Indeed there is scarcely any doctrine against which the carnal heart rises with such acrimony, as against the sovereignty of God. evertheless we must maintain that the Governor of the universe ordereth every thing after the counsel of his own will, and dispenseth his gifts *' according to his good pleasure which he hath pur- posed in himself." He once chose the Jews for his peculiar people, not for the sake of any righteousness of theirs, but because he has ordained that he would magnify his grace in them : and for the same reason has he now transferred his favours to the Gentiles. Our Lord, in his first sermon at azareth, warned his hearers, that, if they rejected his gracious over- tures, the blessings of his Gospel should be trans- ferred to the Gentile world : and, to shew them how futile all their objections were, and how delusive their hopes of impunity in sin, he reminded them, that God had in many instances vouchsafed mercy to Gentiles, not only in conjunction with his people, but even in opposition to them: for that there were many lepers in Israel in the time of Elisha; but them had God overlooked, whilst he shewed mercy to aaman the Syrian''. The history to which our Lord referred, is that
 
which is contained in the chapter before us : which we propose to consider, I. In a way of literal interpretation — Under the pressure of a leprosy, which was an in- curable disorder, aaman, the Syrian, applied to Elisha »Lukeiv.27. 120 1 KIGS, V. 13. [24J5. Elisha for a cure. Doubtless every thing that the Syrian physicians could devise had been tried, but to no purpose. It happened however than an Is- raelitish maid, whom the Syrians had taken captive, was living in the service of aaman ; and that she, knpwing what great miracles had been wrought by Elisha, suggested, that by an application to him her master might be restored to health. The idea being suggested to aaman, he determined without delay to apply for a cure. This he did erroneously at first to the king of Israel ; but afterwards to Elisha him- self : but through his own folly and wickedness he nearly lost the benefit which he was so eager to ob- tain : for, instead of following the direction given him by the Prophet, " he turned, and went away in a rage*'." Here let us pause to inquire, what it was that so nearly robbed him of the desired blessing ? It was, 1 . His offended pride — [He had come in great state, and with rich rewards in his hand, to the house of a poor Prophet : and the Prophet had not deigned to come out to him, but had only sent him word wliat
 
he must do in order to a cure. This was considered b}' aaman as an insufferable insult. In his own country he was regarded with the utmost deference ; and was he now to be treated with such indignity by a contemptible Israelite ? o: he would not listen for a moment to a message sent him in so rude a way. Alas! what an enemy to hum.an happiness is pride! Hdvv acute are its feelings! how hasty its judgment ! how impetuous its actings ! But thus it is with all who have high ideas of their own importance. They stop not to inquire whether any insult is intended ; but construing every thing according to their own con- ceptions, they are as full of resentment on account of a fancied insult, as they would be if they had sustained the greatest injuiv: and in many instances do they sacrifice their most important interests to tliis self-applauding, but delusive, passion.] 2. His disappointed expectation — ¦ [aaman had formed an idea of the manner in which the Prophet would effect the cure: nor do we at all condemn the notions he had formed. But what right had he to be offended because the cure was not wrought with all the formalities that he had ])ictured to himself ? If he received the benefit, did it sig- nify to him in what way he received it ? or had he any right to dictate •• ver. 12. 248.] AAMA HEALED OF HIS LEPROSY. 121 dictate to the Prophet, and to God, in what way the cure should be wrought ? Yet, behold because his own expectations were not realized, he breaks out into a passion, and will not accept the blessing in God's appointed way. This throws a great light on innumerable occasions of offence which are taken even among good people. We paint to our- selves the way in which we think others ought to act ; and then^

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