Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Prayer the Best Means of Defeating Invasion.

Prayer the Best Means of Defeating Invasion.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.


2 Chron. xx. 2 — 4. Then there came some that told Jehosaphat,
saying. There cometh a great midlilude against thee from
beifond the sea on this side Syria ; and, behold, (hey be in
Hazazon-tamar, ivhich is En-gedi. ylnd Jehosaphat f tared,
and set himself to seek the Lord, and proclaimed a fast
throughout all Judah. j^nd Judah gathered themselves to-
gether to ask help of the Lord ; even out of all the cities of
Judah they came to seek the Lord.
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.


2 Chron. xx. 2 — 4. Then there came some that told Jehosaphat,
saying. There cometh a great midlilude against thee from
beifond the sea on this side Syria ; and, behold, (hey be in
Hazazon-tamar, ivhich is En-gedi. ylnd Jehosaphat f tared,
and set himself to seek the Lord, and proclaimed a fast
throughout all Judah. j^nd Judah gathered themselves to-
gether to ask help of the Lord ; even out of all the cities of
Judah they came to seek the Lord.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Jun 18, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/18/2014

pdf

text

original

 
PRAYER THE BEST MEAS OF DEFEATIG IVASIO.BY REV. C. SIMEO, M. A.2 Chron. xx. 2 — 4. Then there came some that told Jehosaphat, saying. There cometh a great midlilude against thee from beifond the sea on this side Syria ; and, behold, (hey be in Hazazon-tamar, ivhich is En-gedi. ylnd Jehosaphat f tared, and set himself to seek the Lord, and proclaimed a fast throughout all Judah. j^nd Judah gathered themselves to- gether to ask help of the Lord ; even out of all the cities of Judah they came to seek the Lord. THERE is scarcely any thing tiiat more awfully prov^es men's fallen slate than their readiness to devour one another. There is not a nation under heaven where the art of war is not cultivated ; and he who attains the highest proficiency in that art, and is crowned with most success in destroying his fellow- * Fast-day Sermon, Oct. ig, 1603. 2T9.] IVASIO BEST DEFEATED BY PRAYER. 281 fellow-creatures, is deemed the greatest benefactor to his country, and is rewarded with all the honours that can be heaped upon him. Under these circum- stances it is not optional with a nation whether they will have a mihtary force : they are compelled to maintain armies, and to preserve their lives and liberties by the same means that others use to sub-  jugate and overwhelm them. Yet there are other means of self-defence, which, though they do not supersede the use of arms, are more effectual than numerous levies, or military skill. What these means are, the text informs us. Jehosaphat was
 
invaded by three confederate armies ; and, though taken by surprise, and consequently not having an hour to lose in mustering his forces, he devoted a day to humiliation and prayer for the Divine aid. This to many would seem absurd : but to those who beheve in the all-governing providence of God, it will appear the most rational and most efficacious method of defence, which it was possible for him to adopt. In considering this account of Jehosaphat, we shall point out, I. His feelings on the approach of an invasion — We have no reason to think that Jehosaphat was defective in courage ; yet he " feared." But what was it that he dreaded? was it merely his own personal danger ? o ; he feared, 1 . The calamities that were coming on the nation — [Fear even of personal danger is by no means incompatible with real courage. It is an affection planted in the human breast by God himself, and is necessary to put us on our guard, and to- stir us up to use the means of safety. It is then only to be deemed a weaknesSj when it incapacitates us for deliberate counsel, or manly exertion. But when the danger is public, and the welfare of a whole nation is at stake, then it is ciiminal not to fear : thoughtlessness and indifference then become most inex- cusable, inasmuch as they manifest an atheistical security with respect to themselves, and an utter want of humanity towards others. Who can reflect on the miseries that an invading army may occasion, and not tremble for the land that is exposed to them ? We confess, that one of the worst symptoms that appear
 
m 282 2 CHROXICLES, XX. 2 — 4. [279. in our land at this present moment, is, the general, and almost total, want of this fear. It should seem as if we thought it out of the power of man, or even of God himself, to hurt us. We are really sleeping, while our enemies are watchful; and folding our arms in security, while the gathering storm is ready to burst upon us. Would to God that we had more fear of the ap- proaching danger ! and then we should have less cause to fear when it was actually arrived.] 1. The displeasure of God in them — [This it is which makes an invading army terrible. This renders even the weakest insect, a locust, or a caterpillar, an object of dread*. We are sure that " men are God's sword ;" and that whatever be the motive that actuates iheni, it is he who gives them their commission, it is he who sends them to " avenge the quarrel of his covenant''." ow Jehosaphat had particular reason to apprehend the Divine displeasure, having incurred it by making an alliance with Ahab*^: and doubtless he considered the invaders as persons sent of God to inflict the punishment he deserved. And was not this just ground for fear ? Here again we cannot but lament that the generality amongst us leave God out of their thoughts : they declaim against the ambition of him who would reduce us, as he has done one half of Europe, to a state of vassalage ; but they never associate with his plans the idea of God's displeasure. To say that " God had stirred him up against us"^," would be looked upon as absurd: to suggest that he was an instrument in God's hands, lifted up to punish our sins, would be deemed a weak enthusiastic notion, a dream of a distempered imagination. But this is true, whether we will believe it or not : and it is this, much more than either the number of his forces, or the inveteracy of his malice, which renders him formidable. Were he far less equal to the contest

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->