Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Calling of the Gentiles Prayed for.

The Calling of the Gentiles Prayed for.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.




Ps. lxvii. 1 — 7. God be merciful unto us, and bless us; and
cause his face to shine upon its : that thy ivay may he known
upon earth, thy saving health among all natio?is. Let the
people praise thee, God ; let all the people praise thee.
let the nations be glad, and sing for joy ; for thou shalt
judge the people righteously, and govern the nations iipon
earth. Let the people praise thee, God; let all the people
praise thee. Then shall the earth yield her increase; and
God, even our own God, shall bless us: God shall bless us;
and all the ends of the earth shall fear him.
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.




Ps. lxvii. 1 — 7. God be merciful unto us, and bless us; and
cause his face to shine upon its : that thy ivay may he known
upon earth, thy saving health among all natio?is. Let the
people praise thee, God ; let all the people praise thee.
let the nations be glad, and sing for joy ; for thou shalt
judge the people righteously, and govern the nations iipon
earth. Let the people praise thee, God; let all the people
praise thee. Then shall the earth yield her increase; and
God, even our own God, shall bless us: God shall bless us;
and all the ends of the earth shall fear him.

More info:

Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jun 20, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/20/2014

pdf

text

original

 
THE CALLIG OF THE GETILES PRAYED FOR. BY REV. C. SIMEO, M. A.Ps. lxvii. 1 — 7. God be merciful unto us, and bless us; and cause his face to shine upon its : that thy ivay may he known upon earth, thy saving health among all natio?is. Let the people praise thee, God ; let all the people praise thee. let the nations be glad, and sing for joy ; for thou shalt  judge the people righteously, and govern the nations iipon earth. Let the people praise thee, God; let all the people praise thee. Then shall the earth yield her increase; and God, even our own God, shall bless us: God shall bless us; and all the ends of the earth shall fear him. HOW much importance the Compilers of our Liturgy attached to this psalm may be judged from the appointment of it to be read m the daily services of our Church. The general import of the psalm is plain enough : but, in order to get a just view of the different expressions contained in it, we must place ourselves in the situation of David at the time he composed it. The Jewish Church and nation were a peculiar people, instructed in the knowledge of salvation, and living under the go- vernment of Jehovah. The righteous among them enjoyed the light of God's countenance, and looked forward to the possession of yet richer blessings under the reign of their Messiah. But the Gentile world were altogether ignorant of a Saviour, and living without God in the world, under the tyranny of the prince of darkness, by whom they were led captive at his will. These two things then the Psalmist desired, namely, The Advent of the Mes- siah to his own nation, and the Manifestation of him to all the world. The former of these events was prayed for in the beginning of the psalm; " God,
 
be merciful unto us, and bless us " with the accom- plishment of that promise, to which all thy people are looking forward, the Advent of the Messiah : and ** cause thy face to shine upon us," in the person of Him, who is " the brightness of thy glory, and the express image of thy person!" The latter event however iaO PSALMS, LXVII. 1—7. [380. however seems on this occasion to have chiefly oc- cupied his mind : and the immediate exhibition of Christ to the Jews was desired in order to his ul- terior Manifestation to the Gentile world, whom he longed to see partakers of all the privileges which he either enjoyed, or hoped for. He longed to see them brought into " the way" of truth and " salva- tion," and subjected to the '* righteous government" of the Messiah, and growing up before God in mt^l- titudes, " like the piles of grass upon the earth^" This being the general subject of the psalm, we 3hall proceed to notice some important instruction that is to be gathered from it. It shews us, T. That there are rich blessings yet in store for the Gentiles — [The whole psahn might with great propriety be read in the future tense, as a prophecy. In the two concluding verses of the psalm it is so read in our translation : and it might have been so read throughout. And in that view how singularly striking is it ! how strong and numerous the assertions, that such an event sha,ll take place ! At present indeed there seems to be but little prospect of so glorious an event : but we are well assured, it shall come, and that too at no distant period. Indeed in part it is already come : for who are we but Gentiles ? By the preaching of the Apostles, myriads were converted to the faith of Christ :
 
and myriads are yet monuments of his power and grace. But this is only the first-fruits : we expect a harvest, when " a little one shall become a thousand, and a small one a strong nation." We believe that the day is coming when " all the ends of the earth shall remember themselves, and turn unto the Lord their God : " " they shall fear the Lord their God, and David their king''." " The way" of salvation through a crucified Redeemer *^ shall then be known among them, and "the saving health " of the Gospel be then imparted to those vi^ho are now dying in their sins. The bond-slaves of sin and Satan shall then cast off the yoke of their oppressor, and yield themselves vvilling subjects to the Prince of peace. In a word, they who have hitherto known no pleasure but in the indulgence of their lusts, shall " be glad in the Lord, and sing praise to his name," and " re-  joice in him" as their God for ever and ever. Glorious period ! May God hasten it in his time ! "j It ^ ver. 6. with Ps. Ixxii. 16. Compare Isai. xxxv. 1, 2. & Iv. 1^, 13. '' Hos. iii. 5. SBC] CALLIG OF TtiE GETILES PEATED FOR. t^t It further shews us, II. What an union there is between piety and phil- anthropy — [The Jews were represented by their enemies as haters of mankind. But this was in no respect applicable to the godly among them. What could exceed the love of David towards the Gentile world ? We cannot conceive greater earnestness than is expressed for their welfare in this psalm. David seems scarcely to think that he himself is blessed, whilst the Gentile world remain destitute of any share in his blessings. This philan- thropy was the fruit of his piety : and whertver true piety exists, it will shew itself in a concern for those who are afar off from God, and perishing in their sins. All piety that is devoid of

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->