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P. 1
Deliverance From Spiritual Bondage Acknowledged.

Deliverance From Spiritual Bondage Acknowledged.

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Published by glennpease
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.


Ps. exxvi. 1 — 4. When the Lord turned again the captivity of
Zion, we were like them that dream. Then was our mouth
Jilled with laughter, and our tongue with singing. Then said
they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for
them. The Lord hath done great things for us, whereof we
are glad. Turn again our captivity j Lordj as the streams
in the south.
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.


Ps. exxvi. 1 — 4. When the Lord turned again the captivity of
Zion, we were like them that dream. Then was our mouth
Jilled with laughter, and our tongue with singing. Then said
they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for
them. The Lord hath done great things for us, whereof we
are glad. Turn again our captivity j Lordj as the streams
in the south.

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Published by: glennpease on Jun 21, 2014
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DELIVERACE FROM SPIRITUAL BODAGE ACKOWLEDGED. BY REV. C. SIMEO, M. A.Ps. exxvi. 1 — 4. When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion, we were like them that dream. Then was our mouth Jilled with laughter, and our tongue with singing. Then said they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for them. The Lord hath done great things for us, whereof we are glad. Turn again our captivity j Lordj as the streams in the south. The great body of the Psalms was composed by David : but some were written many hundred years before his time, as the 90th was by Moses ; and others many hundred years after him, as that before us, which was evidently written after the Baby- lonish Captivity. It relates in the first instance to the delivery of Israel from their sore bondage, and their restoration to their long desolated country : but it is well applicable to that redemption which is vouchsafed to the souls of men, and which was shadowed forth by that great event. Let 432.] .DELIVERACE FROM SPIRITUAL BODAGE. 451) Let US consider from the passage, I. The deliverance here celebrated — - Grievous beyond expression was Israel's captivity. They were treated with the utmost cruelty by their Babylonish oppressors'*: and their sufferings were greatly heightened by the derision with which their
 
pious lamentations were regarded''. But in pro- portion to the greatness of their afflictions was their  joy at the unexpected deliverance vouchsafed to them. Observe, 1 . The feelings excited by it — [Among the captives themselves the joy was so great, that they scarcely knew whether it were a reality or a dream. They were like Peter, when delivered from prison by an angel on the very night previous to his intended execution : " He went out and followed the angel ; and wist not that it was true which was done by the angel; but thought he saw a vision*^." All their lamen- tations were instantly turned to joy : " their mouth was filled with laughter, and their tongue with singing." The sight of such an unprecedented event filled all the surrounding nations with astonishment, and constrained them to acknowledge that it was the work, not of man, but of God : " Then said they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for them." The Israelites themselves readily concurred in this sentiment ; and, on hearing the congratulations offered them, thankfully replied," The Lord hath done great things for us, whereof we are glad.^*] 2. The supplications it drew forth — [Though permission was given them to return to their owii land, and every thing was provided for their sustenance by the way, and their assistance at the end of their journey, the Jews saw that there was a great and discouraging work before them : but, as nothing was impossible to Jehovah, they intreated him to perfect what he had begun, and " to turn again their captivity as the streams in the south." In the southern or hilly country of Judea there were, as in all mountainous countries, frequent and sudden iimndations; which however as rapidly subsided, soon after the rains had ceased ; so that, where but a few hours before the country bore the aspect of universal desolation, it speedily assumed the most lovely and flourishing appearance, the valleys smiling on every side with renovated and augmented verdure. Thus the Jews desired, that the ravages made in their now deso- lated country might be soon repaired, and that, through the
 
influence of their almighty Guardian, their efforts might be crov/ned witli speedy and complete success.] We ^ Ps. cxxxvii. S, 9. '' ib. ver. 3, 4. Acts xii. p. 460 PSALMS, cxxvi. 1 — 4. [432. We forbear to dwell upon the event itself, that we may enter somewhat minutely into, II. The more glorious deliverance that was typified by it— The event before us is undoubtedly to be regarded as shadowing forth that infinitely greater deliverance which is wrought for us by the Lord Jesus Christ"^. And the correspondence between the two is par- ticularly striking. Observe, 1. The deliverance itself — [Grievous as was the captivity of the Jews in Babylon, it was nothing in comparison of that sorer bondage to which we are subjected by the power of sin and the wiles of Satan. All indeed have not the same work assigned them; but all are walking after the imagination of their own hearts, " being taken in the snare of the devil, and led captive by him at his will." The promised Deliverer however has arrived ; has entered into the conflict with our great Adversary, and utterly subdued him. Jesus, foretold by name hundreds of years before his advent in the flesh, has accomplished the work for which he was raised up ; and, having now " ascended up on high and led captivity captive," he has sent his Heralds to " proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound." This is the very first use he makes of his newly-acquired power. or is it

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