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How School Librarians

How School Librarians

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Published by John Brown

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Published by: John Brown on Nov 25, 2009
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12/07/2009

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How School Librarians
Help Kids Achieve
Standards
 
The Second Colorado Study
Keith Curry LanceMarcia J. RodneyChristine Hamilton-PennellApril 2000
 
CONTACT
Keith Curry Lance, DirectorLibrary Research ServiceColorado State LibraryColorado Department of Education201 East Colfax Avenue, Suite 309Denver, Colorado 80203-1799Telephone: (303) 866-6737Fax: (303 866-6940E-mail: klance@sni.netWeb site: http://www.lrs.org
 
How School Librarians Help Kids Achieve Standards
T h e S e c o n d C o l o r a d o S t u d y
Executive Summary
Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) reading scores increase withincreases in the following characteristics of library media (LM) programs: LMprogram development, information technology, teacher/library mediaspecialist (LMS) collaboration, and individual visits to the library mediacenter (LMC). In addition, as participation increases in leadership roles, sodoes collaboration between teachers and LMSs. The relationship betweenthese factors and test scores is not explained away by other school orcommunity conditions. (See Figures 1 and 2, pp. 10-11.)
Library Media Program Development
CSAP reading test scores increase with increases in:
n
 
LMS hours per 100 students (7
th
grade),
n
 
total staff hours per 100 students,
n
 
print volumes per student,
n
 
periodical subscriptions per 100 students,
n
 
electronic reference titles per 100 students (7
th
grade), and
n
 
library media expenditures per student.
Information Technology
Where networked computers link library media centers with classrooms,labs, and other instructional sites, students earn higher CSAP reading testscores. These higher scores are particularly linked to the numbers of computers enabling teachers and students to utilize:
n
 
LMC resources, either within the LMC or networked to the LMC,
n
 
licensed databases, and
n
 
Internet/World Wide Web.
Collaboration
A central finding of this study is the importance of a collaborative approachto information literacy. Test scores rise in both elementary and middleschools as library media specialists and teachers work together. In addition,scores also increase with the amount of time library media specialists spendas in-service trainers of other teachers, acquainting them with the rapidlychanging world of information.

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