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SH0626

SH0626

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Published by veronapress
Stoughton Courier Hub 06-26-14
Stoughton Courier Hub 06-26-14

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Published by: veronapress on Jun 25, 2014
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04/24/2015

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Thursday, June 26, 2014 Vol. 132, No. 47 Stoughton, WI ConnectStoughton.com $1
Courier 
 
Hub
 The
 
Stoughton
Courier Hub
NEW NAME!  SAME 
 Great Practice!
 SAME 
 Great Team!
 SAME 
 Great Experience!
Dr. Thor Anderson and Dr. Phil Oinonen are proud to announce the renaming of
Thor J. Anderson DDS
to
Yahara Dental 
. Our team welcomes you to visit
Yahara Dental 
 for all your dental needs!
 Thor J. Anderson, DDS SC 1520 Vernon Street, Stoughton, WI 53589
info@yaharadental.com • www.yaharadental.com
Call to schedule your next appointment!
608.873.7277
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Photos by
Victoria Vlisides
Celebrating life
While the weather stayed relatively dry for Friday’s Stoughton-McFarland-Oregon Relay For Life, there wasn’t a dry eye in Mandt Park after heartfelt speeches from cancer survivors and Stoughton residents Denny Mearz (at right) and Denny’s son Shane. Denny made it to the celebration after finishing up his second round of chemotherapy.After an emotional and inspirational kickoff to the event that goes all night, supporters and survivors like the family above shared hugs, laughs and a lot of love at the event that’s a culmination of a year’s worth of fun-draising to benefit the American Cancer Society. Kathy Breuchel, breast cancer survivor, is embraced by her son Scott Breuchel, and her grand-children Isaac and, from left, Karli, Grace and Kaitlin.
See more photos and a fundrasing update
Page 16
Program helps people get by, around
Stoughton United Ministries expanding transportation options low-income residents
VICTORIA VLISIDES
Unified Newspaper Group 
Stoughton United Min-istries is a relatively recent addition to the area’s roster of social service nonprofit organizations. Since being started by Stoughton United Meth-odist Church in 2012, the secular organization has been gaining momentum with its growing transporta-tion services.SUM’s two main func-tions are focusing on low-income transportation and helping families who are homeless or at-risk for homelessness. Organiz-ers say the two missions work well with one another because the problems they address often go together.The Affordable Transport Program transports Stough-ton Area School District residents from Stoughton to Madison for health appoint-ments and job interviews or
Ted Sehmer is the direc-tor of trans-portation services at Stoughton United Ministires
.Photo by
Victoria Vlisides
Turn to
SUM
 /Page 8 
Inside
Learn about more programs that help families in need
Page 8
Dancing in the streets
Four-day music festival lights up Rotary Park, Opera House
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group 
The folks who’ve turned the Opera House into one of state’s premier performance venues have also created a new music festival that will take place next week in downtown Stoughton.The Catfish River Music Festival is largely the work of Opera House director Bill Brehm.
Stoughton Junior Fair
Meat sale aims to ‘make good’
Annual fair takes place July 2-6
MARK IGNATOWSKI
Unified Newspaper Group 
Your taste buds might not be the primary sense that comes to mind as you stroll through the swine barn at the Stoughton Junior Fair early next month.Of course, there are smells, sights, sounds and textures to take into account, but the inaugu-ral meat animal sale at this year’s fair is a great rea-son to keep your tongue in mind. Fair organizer Rob White said the benefits are twofold: the kids showing the animals get a financial reward for marketing their livestock and winning bid-ders get local, farm-raised meat.“We hope we get a lot of
If you go
What:
 Catfish River Music Festival
When:
 July 3-6
Where:
 Downtown Stoughton
Tickets:
 Free for all out-door acts
Info:
 catfishrivermusicfest.com
Details:
 Page 7
Turn to
Music
 /Page 7 
Turn to
Fair
 /Page 24 
FOCUS ON
STOUGHTON
See what progress the city has made this year.
Page 9
 
2
June 26, 2014
Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
adno=358454-01
Rick and Gail Hopke would like to congratulate their son Michael and his wife Anna on their one year anniversary.
Michael and Anna were married in her
hometown of Tomah, WI on June 29, 2013.
 
She is the daughter of im and Kathy Liddane. Both are graduates of UW-Platteville and are employed by Landmark Services Cooperative. Tey have made their home here in Stoughton, WI. We wish them both many more years of happiness together.
 
Congratulations 
Michael and Anna 
356646-01
UP TO
ORIGINAL RETAIL PRICES
ONLY AT OUR OUTLET STORE
ON HIGHWAY 69N IN BELLEVILLE
DULUTH TRADING OUTLET STORE
Overstocks, catalog returns, and seconds in men’s andwomen’s clothing, footwear, tools and other gear.
STORE HOURSWED - THU11
AM
 - 6
PM
FRI10
AM
 - 7
PM
SAT9
AM
 - 5
PM
SUN12
PM
 - 5
PM
1107 River Street (HWY 69N) BELLEVILLE
Near Burreson’s Foods • 608-424-1227
 Valid through July 6. Offer valid at Belleville Outlet only, during normal business hours. Offer not valid in our other retail stores. Not valid on prior purchases, phone or mail orders, or on DuluthTrading.com. All sales final.
HURRY! SALE ENDS SUNDAY, JULY 6
Home of Ballroom
 ® 
 Jeans, Buck Naked
 Underwear, Fire Hose
 ® 
 workwear, Longtail T
 ® 
 Shirts and more gear all designed and tested by tradesmen
SUMMER BLOWOUT SALE
(CHILL OUT WITH SUPER COOL SAVINGS!)
70% OFF70% OFF
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Photo by
Stephen Ehle
Happy hawk 
This young red tail hawk recently perched itself on a backyard bench in Cooksville. It seemed to be comfortable with people. It has since left the immediate area -- a comfort to local chicken raisers whose eggs recently hatched. The photographer reported he was able to get within five feet of the raptor.
et 
 
onneCted 
Find updates and links right away.Search for us on Facebook as “Stoughton Courier Hub” and then LIKE us.
Photos by
Mark Ignatowski
Drawing with dinosaurs
Young artists, left, make dinosaur dioramas as part of the Stoughton Public Library summer reading program. Mary Tooley, above, explains how scientists piece together bones to figure out what dinosaurs looked like.
 
June 26, 2014
Courier 
 
HubConnectStoughton.com
3
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A walk in the woods led me to ...
m y nei ghbors house.
Oakwood Village University Woods • 6205 Mineral Point Road • Madison, WI 53705
On Oakwood Village University Woods’ 30-acre campus, you’ll have interesting neighbors of all kinds—including those who live in our 9-acre nature preserve. As you follow the walking trails, you’ll be greeted by squirrels jumping from tree to tree, mallards and wood ducks relaxing in our pond, and Great Horned owls keeping watch over the neighborhood. No doubt you’ll have interesting observations to share with your other neighbors over dinner.
Call today to schedule a personal appointment and discover a community where you’ll enjoy neighbors of all kinds: 608-230-4266. Or visit us online at www.oakwoodvillage.net.
Find us on Facebook.
Life’s explorations continued.
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Rutland still looking for the right fit
Officials seek ideas on new town hall
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Strongly rebuffed by vot-ers who rejected borrow-ing up to $1 million for a new town hall in April, Town of Rutland officials want more public com-ment and ideas before try-ing again in September. For the past half-century or so, town government has operated out of essen-tially a metal garage build-ing, and in the past months, board members have sought to replace the office and records storage portion with a more modern facility, leav-ing the current building as a garage. After plans for a 4,800-square-foot build-ing were soundly rejected at the town’s annual meeting April 15, it’s been back to the drawing board, though town officials want more input from residents on what exactly they are looking for. Rutland town chairman Dale Beske said when town officials started “talking seriously” about numbers in March and April, many residents were “up in arms” about the proposal, though he said it had been on the agenda for more than 20 meetings. To give more time for public input and information-gathering, the board decided to reconvene the annual meeting on Sept. 9, and have provided updat-ed information on the town’s website. Comments will be accept-ed through June 30, and though Beske said that’s not necessarily a firm dead-line, comments are desired as soon as possible to give town officials and contrac-tors time to evaluate them and include them in the Sept. 9 presentation. Since the vote at the annual meet-ing, he said the town has received “a few emails” and a few suggestions on the website, but he hopes people will be more vocal in letting town officials know what they want.“We’re trying to come up with options at differ-ent cost levels, and try to identify what the benefits and shortcomings of each particular cost level would be in terms of design,” he said, directing residents to the town’s website, town.rutland.wi.us.
Growing issue
According to a letter sent out last week by Beske to residents, Rutland’s popu-lation has nearly tripled since the current hall was built in the mid-1960s, and with it, the town has added services such as EMS, a senior center and recycling. He said the current build-ing has inadequate space for meetings, tax collec-tion, elections and records storage, causing officers to operate out of their homes. Also, there are no audio-visual facilities for presen-tations during meetings, and inadequate security of records and employees. The space is two-thirds garage space and one-third meeting/office space, and the heating system in the garage area has no bar-rier to prevent diesel fumes and odors from permeating the entire building, and no ventilation to bring in fresh outside air. Beske said the building is poorly insulated, with no air conditioning, and is expensive to heat during the winter months. The well and septic sys-tem are failing and will soon need to be replaced at “considerable expense.” Around three years, ago, the board purchased three acres north of the existing town hall to build a new one. A space needs study was completed last spring, proposing a building of around 5,200 square feet, at a cost of around $1.08 mil-lion. Beske said the consen-sus of people at the annual meeting that month was to proceed with the project. Late last year, the town hired an architectural firm to develop the new build-ing, and signed a contract in January. The town’s build-ing committee started work that month, and by April, had trimmed the size of the building to 4,800 square feet, and presented the plan at the meeting, attended by around 150 people, around 110 of whom voted against the building and financ-ing plans. Voters further
Photo by
Scott De Laruelle
Rutland officials are seeking input on possible designs for a town hall to replace the current one. Below is an artist’s depiction of a proposed 4,800-square-foot town hall that was voted down at the April 15 Town of Rutland annual meeting.
On the web
town.rutland.wi.us
Police: Intoxicated driver hits house in Town of Albion
A 36-year-old woman was arrested for her fifth OWI last Thurs-day after allegedly crashing a car into a house in the Town of Albion.Accord-ing to a news release from the Dane County Sheriff’s Office:Dane County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a car vs. house crash around 2:25 a.m. June 19, on Hwy. 106 in the town of Albion.“The suspect driver, Bianca L. Mathews, fled the scene prior to the depu-ties arrival,” police said. “Stoughton Police were able to apprehend Mathews before she arrived at her residence.” Mathews was also cited for operating after revoca-tion, hit and run, failure to notify of a crash and fail-ure to maintain control. Mathews was not injured in the crash, and is current-ly being held in the Dane County Jail on the felony OWI charge.No charges had been filed as of press time Tues-day.Online court records show Mathews was last convicted of OWI in 2013.
Mathews
SELL IT NOW…
in the Classifieds!
873-6671 or connectstoughton.com

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