Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Penitent Thief.

The Penitent Thief.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY Rev. WILLIAM T. WILSON

LATE RECTOR OF THE CHURCH OF THE MEDIATOR
KINGSBRIDGE, NEW YORK

[KiNGSBRIDGE, 1868.]


"And one of the malefactors which were hanged railed on him,
saying, If thou be Christ, save thyself and us. But the other an-
swering rebuked him, saying. Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou
art in the same condemnation ? And we indeed justly ; for we re-
ceive the due reward of our deeds : but this man hath done nothing
amiss. And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou
comest into thy kingdom. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto
thee, To day shalt tliou be with me in paradise." — St. Luke, xxiii.
39-43-
BY Rev. WILLIAM T. WILSON

LATE RECTOR OF THE CHURCH OF THE MEDIATOR
KINGSBRIDGE, NEW YORK

[KiNGSBRIDGE, 1868.]


"And one of the malefactors which were hanged railed on him,
saying, If thou be Christ, save thyself and us. But the other an-
swering rebuked him, saying. Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou
art in the same condemnation ? And we indeed justly ; for we re-
ceive the due reward of our deeds : but this man hath done nothing
amiss. And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou
comest into thy kingdom. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto
thee, To day shalt tliou be with me in paradise." — St. Luke, xxiii.
39-43-

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Jul 05, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/06/2014

pdf

text

original

 
THE PEITET THIEF. BY Rev. WILLIAM T. WILSO LATE RECTOR OF THE CHURCH OF THE MEDIATOR KIGSBRIDGE, EW YORK [KiGSBRIDGE, 1868.] "And one of the malefactors which were hanged railed on him, saying, If thou be Christ, save thyself and us. But the other an- swering rebuked him, saying. Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation ? And we indeed justly ; for we re- ceive the due reward of our deeds : but this man hath done nothing amiss. And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt tliou be with me in paradise." — St. Luke, xxiii. 39-43- AMOG the many scenes and incidents which are brought before us in the different narratives of the Lord's passion and crucifixion, not the least significant or affecting is the story of the penitent thief. It takes its place with those other facts recur- ring every now and then in the ministry of the Saviour, which exhibit so touchingly the tender com- passion of that friend of sinners, and witness so re- assuringly to the marvels which are wrought in the human heart by a sincere and true contrition. We associate it in our thought with the story of the adulteress, the Magdalene who wept at the feet of Jesus, and the despised Zaccheus, the publican, at whose house the Master so graciously abode. It is recorded by only one evangelist, but he is the one 156 THE PEITET THIEF.
 
whose gospel dwells more largely than the others upon the facts of grace and pardon, and who alone has given us the parable of the prodigal son. That parable and this story seem to be the complements of each other, and together serve to illustrate and enforce a truth more comforting to us, perhaps, than any other. The gospel would not be to us all that it now is had we never heard the words, '' I will arise, and go to my Father ; " nor would it be all that it now is if in answer to that supplicating cry : '' Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom,'' there had been no reassuring word : '' To day shalt thou be with me in paradise." Yet, in the interpretation of this story and the appropriation of its moral significance, we must be careful to bear in mind the probable character and circumstances of the subject of it. Without any wish to narrow down its meaning, but with the pur- pose rather to insist upon that meaning as far as it can legitimately go, still it is necessary to guard against the inferences that may be drawn from some popular errors in respect to it. Their best corrective, perhaps, is to be found in the simple statement of what may be considered as the results of the most fair and impartial criticism. Thus the story is popularly known as that of the penitent thief. And here at the outset we are likely to be led astray in our estimate of the probable char- acter of the penitent. The word "thief* in our usage designates the lowest and meanest class of social offenders; and while there are crimes darker far than thieving, still that seems especially to indi- THE PEITET THIEF, 157 cate a certain permanent and habitual viciousness of
 
character. Before one is degraded to that, he has gen- erally lost much, if not all, of the other native good- ness that was once in him. But this man belonged to quite a different order of criminals. The word translated ** thief" in the incidental reference of Matthew and Mark more properly means '* robber; " and St. Luke, in his detailed account, does not call him a thief, but a "" malefactor," — an evil-doer. The distinction, perhaps, would not be of any particular importance were it not for some facts which are known concerning the character and circumstances of those civil offenders whom the Romans were accus- torned to call *' malefactors " and ''robbers." Their offence generally originated in a participation in some of the many insurrections which were so fre- quent at that time against the imperial government, and which brought upon so many, even of the better class of Jewish citizens, the ban of outlawry and pro- scription. It often happened that a man of sincere but misguided purpose, joining in some one of these never-ending civil commotions, found himself sud- denly without a home, hunted from place to place by the Roman soldiery, and compelled at last to take refuge with others, not always the associates of his own selection, in the mountain fastnesses of Judaea. There these bands of political outlaws led a precarious existence from day to day, subsisting as best they could. Under such circumstances, moral distinctions, nice discriminations in regard to property, are not apt long to survive ; and, as a natural conse- quence, depredations upon the surrounding country 158 THE PEITET THIEF. and deeds of violence sooner or later followed. And thus a man who began by being simply what we should call a fanatic, or perhaps a patriot, ended by becoming more or less of a bandit and a robber. Yet it is not

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->