Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Indictment of Judah.

The Indictment of Judah.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 5 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY Rev. WILLIAM T. WILSON

LATE RECTOR OF THE CHURCH OF THE MEDIATOR
KINGSBRIDGE, NEW YORK [KiNGSBRIDGE, l874.]


** For the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house of Israel, and
the men of Judah his pleasant plant : and he looked for judgment, but
behold oppression ; for righteousness, but behold a cry." — IsA. v. 7.
BY Rev. WILLIAM T. WILSON

LATE RECTOR OF THE CHURCH OF THE MEDIATOR
KINGSBRIDGE, NEW YORK [KiNGSBRIDGE, l874.]


** For the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house of Israel, and
the men of Judah his pleasant plant : and he looked for judgment, but
behold oppression ; for righteousness, but behold a cry." — IsA. v. 7.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Jul 05, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/05/2014

pdf

text

original

 
THE IDICTMET OF JUDAH. BY Rev. WILLIAM T. WILSO LATE RECTOR OF THE CHURCH OF THE MEDIATOR KIGSBRIDGE, EW YORK [KiGSBRIDGE, l874.] ** For the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house of Israel, and the men of Judah his pleasant plant : and he looked for judgment, but behold oppression ; for righteousness, but behold a cry." — IsA. v. 7. I the reading of the Scripture no one can have failed to notice the oft-recurring expression of " the Day of the Lord." We meet with it again and again in the prophetic writings of the Old Testament, and it passes into familiar usage in the Epistles of the ew. In this latter reference the expression is commonly associated in the popular mind with the second advent, or coming, of Christ. That is the first and principal expectation which the phrase awakens. Our thought goes on to the great Judg- ment Day, to the reappearance of the Son of Man, in majesty and glory, to the assembled nations of the earth, all gathered at His feet. This is what we com- monly understand by " the Day of the Lord;" these are the grand and solemn scenes which are most generally associated with it. But while this expec- tation is a just and true one, while this interpretation of the expression is the only one that comes up to its entire and ultimate meaning, we must, nevertheless, THE IDICTMET OF JUDAH. 519 remember that the phrase is often used in Scripture with a secondary, and what may seem to us an inferior, significance. Any crisis in national or indi- vidual experience, any signal visitation of sin, any
 
marked and extraordinary deliverance, is spoken of as a ** day of the Lord/' God is conceived of as being specially present, immanent, and operative in all such instances. The devout and inspired minds of those holy men of old, " who spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost," dwelt less upon the natural than upon the supernatural character of the more promi- nent events in human history. Such crises seemed to them the occasions of the divine revelation — the times and the ways in which God came out, as it were, from the invisible seclusion of His heavens, and made Himself seen and felt and manifest in the affairs of men. Thus our Lord Himself spoke of the fall of Jerusalem, of the overthrow of the Jewish nationality and polity, as a "day of the Lord," as a " coming of the Son of Man." " This generation," He says, ''shall not pass away till all" (that is, the pre- dicted destruction) " be fulfilled." And in similar manner the prophets always represent any signal in- stance of judgment or deliverance in the history of their people as a" day of the Lord." As we read their writings we are impressed by the recurring frequency of the phrase, and by the power and depth of the con- viction which it expresses. In their thought every great event took on a most grand and solemn signifi- cance. It was a meeting point between God and man. It was a disclosure of the eternal will that shapes and controls all the seeming vicissitudes of 320 THE IDICTMET OF JUDAII fortune. It was a manifestation to human eyes of the unseen power that lies back of all the physical and moral forces of the world. It was a voice speak- ing from the skies, a face looking down between the parted clouds, an arm stretched forth from out the darkness. It was a *' day of the Lord," a day of Revelation, a day in which the supreme and divine
 
Ruler of men made Himself known to their hearts in deliverance or in judgment. ow it is of just such a "day of the Lord" that we have read this morning in the prophecy of Isaiah. The Book opens with a vision of mingled  judgment and deliverance. The time had come, or was coming soon, when God in some signal way should make Himself manifest to His people ; when He should punish and save ; when men, amid their changing hopes and fears, should be brought back again to the earlier faith of their fathers, and forced once more to believe in and acknowledge the God who judgeth the earth. The age was a sadly degen- erate one. Judah had never, perhaps, been more powerful and prosperous, but the true glory of the nation was passing away. The simplicity of early manners, the purity of the primitive faith, the strong fellow-feeling of the tribal times, the respect for mor- als, the love of truth and righteousness, the reveren- tial consciousness of God — all these were gone or going : and there had come, instead, universal greed and luxury and corruption ; a practical disbelief in God, a virtual repudiation of morals, a wide and ever- widening gulf between the self-indulgence of wealth and the sullen discontent of poverty. It seems THE IDICTMET OF JUDAH. 321 Strange that so many hundreds of years before the final overthrow of the Jewish commonwealth the nation should have presented all these signs of im- pending dissolution. Yet, as far back as the time of Isaiah, it seemed to him like a man whose " whole head was sick, and his whole heart faint." " From the sole of the foot to the crown of the head," he says, "there is no soundness in it." Such a condi- tion, he knew, however deceitful in outward appear-

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->