Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Valentine

Valentine

Ratings: (0)|Views: 569|Likes:
Published by api-26488999

More info:

Published by: api-26488999 on Nov 28, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, DOC, TXT or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

03/18/2014

pdf

text

original

Valentine's Day Fun Fact

Here is the most enjoyable and unbelievable
collection of Valentine's Day Fun Facts. Share these
fun facts with your friends to amaze them this
Valentine Day.

\u2022

About 1 billion Valentine's Day cards are
exchanged in US each year. That's the
largest seasonal card-sending occasion of the
year, next to Christmas.

\u2022
Women purchase 85% of all valentines.
\u2022

In order of popularity, Valentine's Day cards
are given to teachers, children, mothers,
wives, sweethearts and pets.

\u2022
Parents receive 1 out of every 5 valentines.
\u2022
About 3% of pet owners will give Valentine's
Day gifts to their pets.
\u2022
Valentine's Day and Mother's Day are the
biggest holidays for giving flowers.
\u2022
Worldwide, over 50 million roses are given
for Valentine's Day each year.
\u2022

California produces 60 percent of American
roses, but the vast number sold on
Valentine's Day in the United States are
imported, mostly from South America.
Approximately 110 million roses, the majority
red, will be sold and delivered within a three-
day time period.

\u2022

73% of people who buy flowers for
Valentine's Day are men, while only 27
percent are women.

\u2022

Men buy most of the millions of boxes of candy and bouquets of flowers given on Valentine's Day.

\u2022

In the Middle Ages, young men and women
drew names from a bowl to see who their
valentines would be. They would wear these
names on their sleeves for one week. To
wear your heart on your sleeve now means
that it is easy for other people to know how
you are feeling.

\u2022

The Italian city of Verona, where
Shakespeare's lovers Romeo and Juliet lived,
receives about 1,000 letters addressed to
Juliet every Valentine's Day.

\u2022
Richard Cadbury invented the first Valentines
Day candy box in the late 1800s.
\u2022

Alexander Graham Bell applied for his patent
on the telephone, an "Improvement in
Telegraphy", on Valentine's Day, 1876.

\u2022

The oldest surviving love poem till date is
written in a clay tablet from the times of the
Sumerians, inventors of writing, around 3500
B.C

\u2022

Amongst the earliest Valentine's Day gifts
were candies. The most common were
chocolates in heart shaped boxes.

\u2022

In some countries, a young woman may
receive a gift of clothing from a prospective
suitor. If the gift is kept, then it means she
has accepted his proposal of marriage

\u2022

If an individual thinks of five or six names
considered to be suitable marriage partners
and twists the stem of an apple while the
names are being recited, then it is believed
the eventual spouse will be the one whose
name was recited at the moment the stem
broke.

\u2022

In Medieval times, girls ate unusual foods on
St Valentine's Day to make them dream of
their future husband.

Valentine's Day Superstitions

It is said that the kind of bird a girl watches on
Valentine's Day predicts her future husband. For
instance:

Sparrow: a poor man
Owl: remain spinster
Bluebird: a happy man
Blackbird: a priest or clergyman
Crossbill: an argumentative man

\u2022

If an apple is cut in half, the number of seeds found inside the fruit will indicate the number of children that individual will have.

\u2022
To be awoken by a kiss on Valentine's Day is
considered lucky.
\u2022

On Valentine's Day, the first guy's name you read in the paper or hear on the TV or radio will be the name of the man you will marry.

\u2022
If you see a squirrel on Valentine's Day, you
will marry a cheapskate who will hoard all
your money.
\u2022
If you see a goldfinch on Valentine's Day, you
will marry a millionaire.
\u2022

If you see a robin on Valentine's Day, you will
marry a crime fighter - maybe they mean
Batman!

\u2022

If you see a flock of doves on Valentine's
Day, you will have a happy, peaceful
marriage.

\u2022

If you find a glove on the road on Valentine's Day, your future beloved will have the other missing glove.

The History of Valentine's Day
Send a Valentine's eCard!

The origins of Valentine's Day trace back to the ancient Roman celebration of Lupercalia. Held on February 15, Lupercalia honored the gods Lupercus and Faunus, as well as the legendary founders of Rome, Romulus and Remus.

In addition to a bountiful feast, Lupercalia festivities are purported to have included the
pairing of young women and men. Men would draw women's names from a box, and each
couple would be paired until next year's celebration.

While this pairing of couples set the tone for today's holiday, it wasn't called "Valentine's Day"
until a priest named Valentine came along. Valentine, a romantic at heart, disobeyed Emperor
Claudius II's decree that soldiers remain bachelors. Claudius handed down this decree
believing that soldiers would be distracted and unable to concentrate on fighting if they were
married or engaged. Valentine defied the emperor and secretly performed marriage
ceremonies. As a result of his defiance, Valentine was put to death on February 14.

After Valentine's death, he was named a saint. As Christianity spread through Rome, the
priests moved Lupercalia from February 15 to February 14 and renamed it St. Valentine's Day
to honor Saint Valentine.

What's Cupid Got to Do with It?

According to Roman mythology, Cupid was the son of Venus, the goddess of love and beauty. Cupid was known to cause people to fall in love by shooting them with his magical arrows. But Cupid didn't just cause others to fall in love - he himself fell deeply in love.

As legend has it, Cupid fell in love with a mortal maiden named Psyche. Cupid married Psyche,
but Venus, jealous of Psyche's beauty, forbade her daughter-in-law to look at Cupid. Psyche,
of course, couldn't resist temptation and sneaked a peek at her handsome husband. As
punishment, Venus demanded that she perform three hard tasks, the last of which caused
Psyche's death.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->