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Giving All Diligence

Giving All Diligence

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Published by glennpease
EDITED BY REV. EDWARD ATKYNS BRAY

FROM WARBURTON*.



2 PETER i. o, 6, 7-

Giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, and
to virtue knowledge^ and to knowledge temper-
ance, and to temperance patience, and to pa-
tience godliness, and to godliness brotherly-
kindness, and to brotherly-kindness charity.
EDITED BY REV. EDWARD ATKYNS BRAY

FROM WARBURTON*.



2 PETER i. o, 6, 7-

Giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, and
to virtue knowledge^ and to knowledge temper-
ance, and to temperance patience, and to pa-
tience godliness, and to godliness brotherly-
kindness, and to brotherly-kindness charity.

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Published by: glennpease on Jul 09, 2014
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GIVIG ALL DILIGECEEDITED BY REV. EDWARD ATKYS BRAYFROM WARBURTO*. 2 PETER i. o, 6, 7- Giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, and to virtue knowledge^ and to knowledge temper- ance, and to temperance patience, and to pa- tience godliness, and to godliness brotherly- kindness, and to brotherly-kindness charity. The holy Apostle^ beginning his farewell epistle to the Churches with a commendation of their" faith, takes occasion from thence to instruct them in the nature of that Christian edification which they were to raise on it ; and^ as his last labour of love, brings together all the various materials proper for so great a work. But we shall have a very wrong conception of our Apostle*s skill, if we consider these but as ma- terials thrown together without art or choice ; and • William Warburton, Bishop of Gloucester, was born 1691, and died 1779. 394 standing in need of other hands to range them in that architectonic order in which they are to be employed. For, on a careful survey of his plan, it will be found, that no other than that Spirit which directed the workmen of the old tabernacle,
 
could give so artful a disposition to the materials of this new building not made with hands, whose builder and maker is God, He has marked out the foundation ; he has fixed the basis ; proportioned the members ; adorned the superstructure ; and crowned the whole with the richest materials. And all this^, with such justice of science, sublimity of thought, and force of genius, that every foregoing virtue gives stability to the following ; and every following imparts per- fection to that which went before : where the three orders of this heavenly architecture, the hmnan, the divine, and the social virtues, are so masterly disposed ; that the human and social have their proper strength and graces heightened and sup- ported by the common connexion of the divine : where every thing, in short, concurs, in its proper station, for the perfecting of the saints; for the edifying of the body of Christ, In conformity to the masters of science, who deliver it to their disciples as a first principle, that no considerable advancement is to be expected without much pains and labour ; our holy artist introduces his rules with this preliminary precept — Giving all diligence. 395 St. Petei% as a lolse master-builder, chooses for his foundation that rock on which our Lord had promised him to build the Church ; add to your FAITH — as directed by the same divine Spirit with his fellow-labourer, St. Paul, who bids every man take HEED how he buildeth ; for other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ.
 
But the simplicity and clearness of the doctrine of faith, could not secure it, even in the apostolic times^ from being perverted to countenance the most fatal error concerning its nature and effi- cacy ; while it was mistaken to be alone sufficient to make man acceptable [to his Maker ; and, with- out good works, to entitle him to the rewards of the Gospel-covenant. This dangerous extravagance, which has continued, more or less, to infect all ages of the Christian Church, spread immediately so swift and wide, upon the wings of that divine truth, ttiat a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law, that the apostolic writers found it necessary to give it a frequent and formal confu- tation. And on this account, St. Peter's first pre- cept enjoins us to add or build virtue upon faith. Add to your faith, virtue. God having before revealed the whole doctrine of morality by the religion of nature, (and none of God's dispensa- tions contradicting another,) it was enough for the first teachers of Christianity, when they preached 396 Virtue, to refer their followers for particulars, to what 7iafural religion taught concerning" it. Scripture, then, constantly referring to the law of nature, — what can result from the study of Scripture, by one ignorant of that law, but doubt and uncertainfi/y if modest; and if vain and pre- suming, and, at the same time, (which has too often happened,) a teacher of others by profession, what but mistakes and errors ; the fatal errors of superstition and fanaticism ?

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