Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
58Activity
P. 1
(ebook) Niebuhr, Reinhold - Moral Man and Immoral Society - A Study in Ethics and Politics (philo

(ebook) Niebuhr, Reinhold - Moral Man and Immoral Society - A Study in Ethics and Politics (philo

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4,295 |Likes:
Published by api-19832891

More info:

Published by: api-19832891 on Nov 30, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/18/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 Moral Man and Immoral Society: AStudy in Ethics and Politics
by Reinhold Niebuhr
Published in 1932 by Charles Scribner's Sons. This material was prepared for Religion Online by Ted andWinnie Brock.
 
 
 
Introduction
 The inferiority of the morality of groups to that of individuals is due in part to the difficulty of establishing a rational social force which is powerful enough to cope with the naturalimpulses by which society achieves its cohesion; but in part it is merely the revelation of acollective egoism, compounded of the egoistic impulses of individuals, which achieve a morevivid expression and a more cumulative effect when they are united in a common impulsethan when they express themselves separately and discreetly.
Chapter 1: Man and Society: The Art of Living Together 
 History is a long tale of abortive efforts toward the desired end of social cohesion and justicein which failure was usually due either to the effort to eliminate the factor of force entirely or to an undue reliance upon it.
Chapter 2: The Rational Resources of the Individual for Social Living
 The traditions and superstitions, which seemed to the eighteenth century to be the very root of injustice, have been eliminated, without checking the constant growth of social injustice. Yetthe men of learning persist in their hope that more intelligence will solve the social problem.They may view present realities quite realistically; but they cling to their hope that anadequate pedagogical technique will finally produce the "socialised man" and thus solve the problems of society.
Chapter 3: The Religious Resources of the Individual for Social Living
 If the recognition of selfishness is prerequisite to the mitigation of its force and the diminutionof its antisocial consequences in society, religion should be a dominant influence in thesocialisation of man; for religion is fruitful of the spirit of contrition.
Chapter 3: The Religious Resources of the Individual for Social Living
 If the recognition of selfishness is prerequisite to the mitigation of its force and the diminutionof its antisocial consequences in society, religion should be a dominant influence in thesocialisation of man; for religion is fruitful of the spirit of contrition.
Chapter 4: The Morality of Nations
 A discussion of the moral characteristics of a nation and the reasons for the selfishness andhypocrasy found therein.
Chapter 4: The Morality of Nations
 A discussion of the moral characteristics of a nation and the reasons for the selfishness andhypocrasy found therein.
Chapter 5: The Ethical Attitudes of Privileged Classes
 The prejudices, hypocrisies and dishonesties of the privileged and ruling classes is analyzed.The moral attitudes of dominant and privileged groups are characterised by universal self-deception and hypocrisy.
Chapter 5: The Ethical Attitudes of Privileged Classes
 The prejudices, hypocrisies and dishonesties of the privileged and ruling classes is analyzed.
 
The moral attitudes of dominant and privileged groups are characterised by universal self-deception and hypocrisy.
Chapter 6: The Ethical Attitudes of the Proletarian Class
 If we analyse the attitudes of the politically self-conscious worker in ethical terms, their moststriking characteristic is probably the combination of moral cynicism and unqualifiedequalitarian social idealism which they betray. The industrial worker has little confidence inthe morality of men; but this does not deter him from projecting a rigorous ethical ideal for society. The effect of this development of an industrial civilisation is vividly revealed in thesocial and political attitudes of the modern proletarian class. These attitudes have achievedtheir authoritative expression and definition in Marxian political philosophy.
Chapter 6: The Ethical Attitudes of the Proletarian Class
 If we analyse the attitudes of the politically self-conscious worker in ethical terms, their moststriking characteristic is probably the combination of moral cynicism and unqualifiedequalitarian social idealism which they betray. The industrial worker has little confidence inthe morality of men; but this does not deter him from projecting a rigorous ethical ideal for society. The effect of this development of an industrial civilisation is vividly revealed in thesocial and political attitudes of the modern proletarian class. These attitudes have achievedtheir authoritative expression and definition in Marxian political philosophy.
Chapter 7: Justice Through Revolution
 Difficult as the method of revolution is for any Western industrial civilisation, it must not beregarded as impossible. The forces which make for concentration of wealth and power areoperative, even though they do not move as unambiguously as the Marxians prophesied.
Chapter 7: Justice Through Revolution
 Difficult as the method of revolution is for any Western industrial civilisation, it must not beregarded as impossible. The forces which make for concentration of wealth and power areoperative, even though they do not move as unambiguously as the Marxians prophesied.
Chapter 8: Justice Through Political Force
 The group, which feels itself defrauded of its just proportion of the common wealth of society, but which has a measure of security and therefore does not feel itself completely disinherited,expresses its political aspirations in a qualified Marxism in which the collectivist goal isshared with the more revolutionary Marxians, but in which parliamentary and evolutionarymethods are substituted for revolution as means of achieving the goal.
Chapter 8: Justice Through Political Force
 The group, which feels itself defrauded of its just proportion of the common wealth of society, but which has a measure of security and therefore does not feel itself completely disinherited,expresses its political aspirations in a qualified Marxism in which the collectivist goal isshared with the more revolutionary Marxians, but in which parliamentary and evolutionarymethods are substituted for revolution as means of achieving the goal.
Chapter 9: The Preservation of Moral Values in Politics
 If coercion, self-assertion and conflict are regarded as permissible and necessary instrumentsof social redemption, how are perpetual conflict and perennial tyranny to be avoided?

Activity (58)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
janusk69 liked this
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
Anderson Lima liked this
leeinsuk liked this
Juraj Hresko liked this
tumeric liked this
mrevkin liked this
libraritine8854 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->