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An Elaborated Instance- Philemon

An Elaborated Instance- Philemon

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Published by glennpease
By Jesse Bowman Young, D.D., Litt.D.


But abide thou in the things which thou hast learned and
hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned
them; and that from a babe thou hast known the sacred
writings which are able to make thee wise unto salvation
through faith which is in Christ Jesus. Every scripture
inspired of God is also profitable for teaching, for reproof,
for correction, for instruction which is in righteousness:
that the man of God may be complete, furnished completely
unto every good work. — 2 Tim. 3. 14-17.
By Jesse Bowman Young, D.D., Litt.D.


But abide thou in the things which thou hast learned and
hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned
them; and that from a babe thou hast known the sacred
writings which are able to make thee wise unto salvation
through faith which is in Christ Jesus. Every scripture
inspired of God is also profitable for teaching, for reproof,
for correction, for instruction which is in righteousness:
that the man of God may be complete, furnished completely
unto every good work. — 2 Tim. 3. 14-17.

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Published by: glennpease on Jul 13, 2014
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A ELABORATED ISTACE- PHILEMO By Jesse Bowman Young, D.D., Litt.D. But abide thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them; and that from a babe thou hast known the sacred writings which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. Every scripture inspired of God is also profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for instruction which is in righteousness: that the man of God may be complete, furnished completely unto every good work. — 2 Tim. 3. 14-17. How precious is the Book divine, By inspiration given! Bright as a lamp its doctrines shine, To guide our souls to heaven. O'er all the strait and narrow way Its radiant beams are cast; A light whose never-weary ray Grows brightest at the last. It sweetly cheers our drooping hearts In this dark vale of tears; Life, light, and joy it still imparts, And quells our rising fears. This lamp, through all the tedious night
 
Of life, shall guide our way, Till we behold the clearer light Of an eternal day.  — John Fawcett. 32 CHAPTER III A ELABORATED ISTACE: PHILEMO In immediate relation with the attractions of the Bible which, as we have just been suggesting, are involved in its structure, an instance may be elabo- rated to advantage. By this specimen it may be shown that unsuspected beauties are sometimes lodged in the setting and environment of a book, and that there are parts of Scripture which may seem to have at first blush but little interest or value, but which when viewed in connection with the circum- stances which gave them birth, and the immediate aim of the writer, are vested at once with a vividness and grace never to be forgotten. This principle may be illumined as well as instanced in the shortest epistle of the apostle Paul, a production which has but twenty-five verses, and which — without the help of the sidelights to be furnished by the historian who is acquainted with Paul's situation and purpose in writing this brief letter — seems to contain but little that is of practical or edifying import. The epistle, without its setting and framework, shows off to poor advantage — like a notable painting which requires to be suitably framed and hung in a proper light in order that its merits may be duly seen.
 
To this short letter, then, let us give attention, drawing upon the assured historic data connected 33 34 CHARMS OF THE BIBLE with PauPs later career in order to secure the side- lights for its illumination. The apostle's opening words — "Paul, a prisoner of Christ Jesus" — taken along with similar allusions in the Epistle to the Colossians, tell us that the produc- tion was written when the writer was in captivity in Rome. It belongs with the Epistles of the Imprison- ment, which include Colossians, Philippians, Ephe- sians, and Second Timothy — a notable category. This fact alone is significant. The apostle spent at least five years in captivity — in Csesarea, in the hands of soldiers during the long and disastrous voyage and journey to Rome, and then in the Imperial City for two years or more. To all human seeming his use- fulness was at an end. The little struggling Church, scattered here and there throughout Asia Minor and Greece, must have been smitten with dismay for the time being when they learned that their chief apostle and guide was a prisoner. And to the apostle him- self the period of captivity must at first have been an inexplicable calamity. What was to become of his work? Who would instruct the converts? Who would direct his fellow missionaries? How could the "regions beyond" be evangelized if he, the leader-in- chief, was in the hands of his enemies in a Roman prison? Questions like these must have taxed and almost distracted him until he learned in whatsoever state he was therein to be content ; until he found out that the afflictive and dreadful things that had happened to him — mob violence, shipwreck, hard-

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