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Asian Journal July 25-31, 2014 Edition

Asian Journal July 25-31, 2014 Edition

Ratings: (0)|Views: 168 |Likes:
Published by ASIAN JOURNAL
THE WISEST CHOICE BY MSGR FERNANDO GUTIERREZ P8
MY CELL PHONE UN-LIBERATION BY SIMEON G SILVERIO JR P1,
CREATIVE WAYS TO INCREASE TOURISM AT THE SAME TIME SUPPORTING SOCIAL ENTERPRISES AND NGOS BY ERNIE DELFIN THE METAMORPHOSIS P 1
AUTOMATIC CITIZENSHIP BY ATTY JEAN TINSAY, CHUA TINSAY VEGA LAW OFFICES, IN LEGAL BUZZ P 2,
FOOD HANDLERS WORKSHOP: KEEPING AND EATING SAFE FOOD BY DR OFELIA DIRIGE IN CONTEMPORARY ASIAN AMERICAN ISSUES P 4,
NOW THE AWAKENING REVISITED BY DR CAESAR D CANDARI MD IN OPINION, P 5,
SAFE AND FUN TRAVEL BY ZENA SULTANA BABAO P10,

DAP ANDTHE ENABLING LAW BY BEN MAYNIGO, P 6
ENTERPRISE AND SOCIAL MEDIA BY MILES BEAUCHAMP P 6,
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY BY BILL LABESTRE MBA P 6

US CITIZEN STEPPARENT CAN PETITION OFFSPRINGS OF ADULTEROUS RELATIONSHIPS BY ATTY SUSAN V PEREZ IMMIGRATION 911 P 7
SA PANAGINIP NA LAMANG BY VIRGINIA FERRER IN BALINTATAW P 8,
HAROND KESTER: A GREAT GIFT TO GOD BY BENJAMIN MAYNIGO TECH IT FROM MY BARBER P 9


COME LET US WORSHIP AND GIVE THANKS TO THE LORD FOR HIS UNFATHOMABLE MERCY AT A EUCHARISTIC HEALING MASS WITH THE REV. FR. JOEY FALLER OF KAMAY NI HESUS, LUCBAN PHL AT THE PRINCE OF PEACE ABBEY OCEANSIDE ON JULY 26 AT 1:00 PM, P 11


Community News, Asian Journal San Diego, JULY 4-10, 2014 Digital Edition, M BEAUTY TIME MACHINE DR TESS MAURICIO, Offices of Chua Tinsay Vega Immigration Law, Atty Rogelio Karagdag Jr U.S. Immigration Law, Atty Susan V Perez U.S. Immigration Law, San Diego News, Philippine News, Arts & Culture, Profiles, Balintataw by Virginia Ferrer, Lower Your Nets by Monsignor Fernando Gutierrez, Light & Shadows by Zena Sultana Babao, At Large by Miles Beauchamp, Take It From My Barber by Benjamin Maynigo, Street Poetry by Michael R Tagudin, Classified Ads, Atty Gail Dulay Harold Hom Immigration Lawyers, CLASSIFIED AD, Wanted Caregiver
THE WISEST CHOICE BY MSGR FERNANDO GUTIERREZ P8
MY CELL PHONE UN-LIBERATION BY SIMEON G SILVERIO JR P1,
CREATIVE WAYS TO INCREASE TOURISM AT THE SAME TIME SUPPORTING SOCIAL ENTERPRISES AND NGOS BY ERNIE DELFIN THE METAMORPHOSIS P 1
AUTOMATIC CITIZENSHIP BY ATTY JEAN TINSAY, CHUA TINSAY VEGA LAW OFFICES, IN LEGAL BUZZ P 2,
FOOD HANDLERS WORKSHOP: KEEPING AND EATING SAFE FOOD BY DR OFELIA DIRIGE IN CONTEMPORARY ASIAN AMERICAN ISSUES P 4,
NOW THE AWAKENING REVISITED BY DR CAESAR D CANDARI MD IN OPINION, P 5,
SAFE AND FUN TRAVEL BY ZENA SULTANA BABAO P10,

DAP ANDTHE ENABLING LAW BY BEN MAYNIGO, P 6
ENTERPRISE AND SOCIAL MEDIA BY MILES BEAUCHAMP P 6,
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY BY BILL LABESTRE MBA P 6

US CITIZEN STEPPARENT CAN PETITION OFFSPRINGS OF ADULTEROUS RELATIONSHIPS BY ATTY SUSAN V PEREZ IMMIGRATION 911 P 7
SA PANAGINIP NA LAMANG BY VIRGINIA FERRER IN BALINTATAW P 8,
HAROND KESTER: A GREAT GIFT TO GOD BY BENJAMIN MAYNIGO TECH IT FROM MY BARBER P 9


COME LET US WORSHIP AND GIVE THANKS TO THE LORD FOR HIS UNFATHOMABLE MERCY AT A EUCHARISTIC HEALING MASS WITH THE REV. FR. JOEY FALLER OF KAMAY NI HESUS, LUCBAN PHL AT THE PRINCE OF PEACE ABBEY OCEANSIDE ON JULY 26 AT 1:00 PM, P 11


Community News, Asian Journal San Diego, JULY 4-10, 2014 Digital Edition, M BEAUTY TIME MACHINE DR TESS MAURICIO, Offices of Chua Tinsay Vega Immigration Law, Atty Rogelio Karagdag Jr U.S. Immigration Law, Atty Susan V Perez U.S. Immigration Law, San Diego News, Philippine News, Arts & Culture, Profiles, Balintataw by Virginia Ferrer, Lower Your Nets by Monsignor Fernando Gutierrez, Light & Shadows by Zena Sultana Babao, At Large by Miles Beauchamp, Take It From My Barber by Benjamin Maynigo, Street Poetry by Michael R Tagudin, Classified Ads, Atty Gail Dulay Harold Hom Immigration Lawyers, CLASSIFIED AD, Wanted Caregiver

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Phl population hits 100 million on Sunday
July 25-31, 2014
(Continued on page 2)
 
Philippine RadioAM 1450M-F 7-8 PM
The original and first Asian Journal in America
550 E. 8th St., Ste. 6, National City, San Diego County CA USA 91950 | Ph: 619.474.0588 | Fx: 619.474.0373 | Email: asianjournal@aol.com | www.asianjournalusa.com
PRST STDU.S. Postage PaidPermit No. 203Chula Vista CA 91910
San Diego’s first and only Asian Filipino weekly publication and a multi-award winning newspaper! Online+Digital+Print Editions to best serve you!
July 25-31, 2014
(Continued on page 2)
Msgr. Gutierrez
 Enterprise and  Social Media - p.
(Continued on page 5)(Continued on page 3)
Ben Maynigo
Miles Beauchamp
NAIA-3 to be fully operational on July 31
Filipino tourists advised not to go on a pilgrimage in Israel
(Continued on page 5)
 HAROLD KESTER: A Great Gift to GOD - p.9
The Wisest Choice -  p. 8
(Continued on page 3)(Continued on page 12)
 
My cell phone un-liberation
Our Life and Times
Imelda the musical casting in Manila for authenticity
 By Simeon G. Silverio, Jr. Publisher & Editor San Diego Asian Journal The Original and First Asian Journal in AmericaSan Diego, California July 25, 2014 Last of two articles
I
n the last issue of the San Diego Asian Journal, I reprinted my article from November 11, 2008, entitled, “My Cell Phone ‘Liberation.’” In the article, I cited some of the reasons why I had decided to get rid of my cell phone. For one, it was expensive to maintain. Additionally, I did not want to be bothered by other people calling me, urging me to do some tasks. Most importantly, I never had a cell phone before, yet somehow survived.A friend of mine noticed that seven months later, I was in possession of a cell phone.“Why?” he asked. “I thought you had already been liberated?”“It’s a long story,” I replied. “One so painful that telling it still hurts.”
It’s been ve years since the incident, and time heals wounds. By now, the pain had
eased. I could now tell the world why I decided to have my cell phone back.It started on June 15, 2009. My wife and second daughter, Ashley, had attended a
“Gawad Kalinga” Conference in Boston. I did not go with them as I wanted to just stay
home and relax. After the conference, they decided to stay for a few more days and ex- plore the area. Although we had been there as a family several times before, there were still a lot of places to see. My youngest daughter, Heather, a private equity analyst in
nearby New York City, decided to join them. But then I came to thinking: Here’s my fam-ily (my eldest daughter was already married then) travelling around Boston without me. Since they would be spending on hotel rooms, why don’t I join them and incur no addi-tional expense? Upon nding a good deal in the Internet, only $250 for a round trip ticket,
the die was cast.
We stayed in Boston for a few days, checking out the Sam Adams Brewery in a suburb
and other areas. We then took the bus to New York City and stayed at my daughter Heath-er’s Manhattan apartment. After a few days exploring the city, we went back home sepa-
rately. Ashley had to take the bus back to Boston to catch her ight, while my wife and
I took a taxi to JFK Airport early in the morning. Along the way, I pulled out my wallet
from my back pocket to make sure I had my driver’s license. I was dropped off rst while
Inquirer.net | NEW YORK,
7/11/2014 — David Byrne
has gone more than an extra mile to ensure his immersive show “Here Lies Love” about
Filipino ex-rst lady Imelda
Marcos is as authentic as pos-
sible as it goes international: He’s just nished casting in
Manila.The Talking Heads front-man went to the Philippines over the July Fourth holiday to add potential names to the
Britain-based talent pool as he
gears up to open the show in London this September at the
by Ernie Deln, The Metamorphosis
My last column on “So-cial Enterprises Can Stop the Widening Gap between the Haves and the Havenots” received many interesting responses and feedbacks. Today’s column is a sort of an expansion of what we, as concerned humanitarians, can
Creative Ways to Increase Tourism at the Same Time Supporting Social Enterprises and NGO’s
Inquirer.net | MANILA, 7/23/2014 – The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) advised Filipino tourists who intend to go to Israel on pil-grimage to defer their trav-
els amid continuing conict
 between the militant group Hamas and the Israel Military.“Israel is under alert level 2, there is deployment ban for newly-hired workers. For tourists we only advise them to defer their travel because of
conict in these areas,” DFA
spokesman Charles Jose said
Tuesday in a press brieng.
“Though tourists will not  be stopped by immigration  because they are not work-ers … we discourage them to travel because we cannot tell what will happen in Israel as a
result of the ongoing conict,”
he said.
Israel is a world-famous tourist des-tination for its religious and historical sites including the city of Jerusalem, regarded as a holy city by followers of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In 2012 alone, 2.8 million tourists came to Israel according to records of the World
Bank.
Israel is among the countries that Fili- pino tourists may visit without the need to apply for a visa.Jose said that there are 36,000 over-seas Filipino workers (OFWs) in Israel,
the large majority of them are caregiv-
Fil-Am Unity Ms PHL 2014 Pageant
Cora Banaban- Anderson ,President and Unity Ofcers would like to thank
 Ludy Vargas
ABS CBN News | MA-
 NILA, 7/24/2014 – The Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 (NAIA-3) is set to  be fully operational by July 31, 17 years after the Depart-ment of Transportation and Communications (DOTC) awarded the concession agree-ment.“We are extremely pleased
to conrm that full airline
operations will begin at NAIA Terminal 3 next week. Our gateway airport will now be able to welcome 3.5 million more passengers with modern facilities every year, and Ter-minal 1 will now be consider-ably decongested to improve  passenger convenience,” Transportation Secretary Jun Abaya said in a statement Thursday.
The transfer of ve inter-
national airlines to NAIA-3 will also push through, with Delta Airlines scheduled to transfer on August 1 while KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Emirates, Singapore Air and
Cathay Pacic set to follow
within the month.
“The Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA) has informed us that
 by Sheila Crisostomo, Philstar.com | MANILA, 7/25/2014- The country’s  population will hit 100 mil-lion shortly after midnight of Sunday, the Commission on Population (PopCom) said yesterday.
“At exactly 12:05:54 on
Sunday, the 100th million  baby will be born. We round-
ed it off to 12:06 a.m. This is
 based on our linear analysis of the midyear population esti-mates of the PSA (Philippine Statistics Authority),” said PopCom executive director Juan Antonio Perez III.
Based on PSA estimates,
the country’s population on July 1 was 99.7 million, with 4,609 Filipino babies being
July 26, 2014 Saturday 1:00 pm
Eucharistic Healing Mass
at the PRINCE OF PEACE ABBEY OCEANSIDE, CA
to be held during the retreat of theDivine Mercy Hills Foundation of Southern California 
 
THE MONASTERY CANNOT ACCOMMODATE LARGE CROWDS. IF YOU PREFER, YOU MAY ATTEND UPCOMING HEALING MASSES IN THE PARISHES OF CHATSWORTH AND GLENDALE IN LOS ANGELES NEXT WEEK. PRIORITY WILL BE GIVEN TO HANDICAPPED AND SICK. PLEASE SEE PAGE 13 FOR INFO.
 
Page 2July 25-31, 2014 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
(Continued from page 1)
Phl population
 Law Ofces of Chua Tinsay & Vegawww.ctvattys.com
by Atty. Jean Tinsay, Esq.
Legal Buzz 
Read Atty. Jean Tinsay’s previous articles by visiting our website at
www.asianjournalusa.com
(Continued on page 3)
(Continued from page 1)
My cell phone un-liberation
Our Life & Times
 Read Sim Silverio’s previous articles by visiting our website at www.asianjournalusa.com
by Simeon G. Silverio Jr.
A Monthly Forum hosted by and for the Fili- pino American Community of San Diego
my wife got off at a different terminal. To my horror, how-ever, my wallet was missing from my back pocket when I was about to get my boarding  pass. I could not present any ID since it was in my wal-let. I panicked. I frantically searched for it despite know-ing it would be futile. I want-ed to call my wife to check if she had seen the wallet in the taxi, but I did not have a cell  phone. I had been “liberated” from it, remember?
It took me a while to ask strangers to
let me borrow their cell phones. The rst
three gave me a strange look. “You have no cell phone? In this day and age?” Finally, an old lady was kind enough to let me make a call. It turned out the taxi driver found my wallet in the back seat of the cab. It slipped from my back  pocket when I tried putting it back. Fortunately, he was able to get hold of Heather, who was already at work then. She called her mom and was able to arrange for the driver to give the wallet
to my wife. But I did not know any of
this, because they could not get hold of me since I didn’t have a cell phone, remember?It took a while for my wife to give me
 back my wallet. By then, I had already missed my ight. The Delta Airlines
 personnel at the counter told me I could
take the next ight with no additional cost. But it would be 8 hours later at 5 in
the afternoon.
“But you have to come early to get a
seat,” she said.If I were to go back to my daughter’s apartment in Manhattan, it would cost
me $50 for the taxi fare, then another $50 to return to the airport. I decided
to wait it out at the airport food court where I could at least eat and relax. I returned to the counter at three in the
afternoon only to nd a long line. By the
time I was served, there were no more
seats available. The ight was sold out.“What about the next ight?” I asked.
I was becoming desperate.“You have to buy a new ticket. That
ight is no longer covered by the cost of
the one you missed this morning.”“How much?”
“$600!”I was taken aback. I only paid $250
for the two-way ticket I purchased ear-
lier, and now had another $600 expense.
And for only a one-way ticket?The airline personnel must have taken  pity of me.“Try Royal Airlines,” she urged. “It might have a better deal.”
I had misgivings at rst, for I thought that airline catered to ights to England.
Desperate as I was, I nevertheless took the train to the Royal Airlines terminal. True enough, the airline only serviced
ights to Britain!By the time I returned to the Delta
Airlines’ terminal, another long line had formed in front of the counter. I had to wait for another thirty minutes only to
learn the 8pm ight was already sold
out.
“What’s your next ight?” I asked.
“We have one bound for Atlanta at midnight, but you have to take a con-
necting ight to San Diego 8 hours later
at 8am.”“How much?”
“$1200.”
I could not believe what I heard. My
$250 two-way ticket deal had increased ve times more. But by then, I was very
desperate to go home. Waiting the whole day had taken its toll on me. I decided to bite the bullet and shell out an extra
$1200, already the cost of a two-way
ticket to the Philippines.
But my journey did not end there. I
arrived at the Atlanta Airport at 1am and had to wait for 7 hours for the connect-
ing ight. I tried to sleep while seated on
the lounge, but by the time I could nod off, the cleaning lady would arrive with her noisy carpet cleaner. I would move to another lounge but in no time, the same cleaning lady would arrive. To top it off, the overhead television monitors continuously blared news of Michael Jackson’s death a few hours before on that fateful day of June 25, 2009.
The rst thing I did as soon as I ar-
rived in San Diego was purchase a cell  phone. The savings I thought I could save by not having one had disappeared that day. My wife could have called me and given back my wallet with my ID if I had a cell phone. I would not have
wasted $1200 for a new ticket!
“Do you hear me now?” my cell  phone must be asking me. “Loud and clear,” is all I could answer. - AJ
Inquirer.net | BEIJING, 2/22/2014 —
A Chinese city has been sealed off and 151 people placed in quarantine since last week after a man died of bubonic  plague, state media said Tuesday.The 30,000 people living in Yumen in the northwestern province of Gansu are not being allowed to leave, and police at roadblocks on the perimeter of the city
are telling motorists to nd alternative
routes, state broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV) said.The 38-year-old victim died last Wednesday, the report said, and had  been in contact with a dead marmot, a small furry animal which lives on grass-lands and is related to the squirrel.
“The city has enough rice, our and
oil to supply all its residents for up to one month,” the report added.“Local residents and those in quaran-tine are all in stable condition.”CCTV said “authorities are not allow-ing anyone to leave,” although a previ-ous report by the China Daily newspa- per said “four quarantine sectors” had  been set up in the city. No further cases had been reported by Tuesday.Plague is categorized as a “Class A infectious disease” in China, a report by
the ofcial news agency Xinhua said,
“the most serious under China’s Law on the Prevention and Treatment of Infec-tious Diseases.”
Bubonic plague is a bacterial infection most well known for the “Black Death,”
a virulent epidemic of the disease that killed tens of millions of people in 14th-century Europe. Primarily an animal illness, it is extremely rare in humans.The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says on its website that mod-ern antibiotics are effective in treat-ing plague, but that without prompt treatment, the disease can cause serious illness or death.“Human plague infections continue to occur in the western United States, but
signicantly more cases occur in parts
of Africa and Asia,” it adds.
-- Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net 
City ‘sealed off’ after man dies of bubonic plague in China
 by: Jean S. Tinsay, Esq.
Almost everyone who is in the United States chasing their American dream aspires to become a naturalized U.S. citizen. With citizenship comes certain
 benets, one of which is that you no
longer need to fear that you may be sub-
 ject to deportation. Thus, as soon as one
is eligible and meet all the requirements,
it is advisable to le a naturalization ap-
 plication. There is, however, a class of foreign-born children who automatically  become U.S. citizens without the need
for ling a naturalization application.
The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 which went into effect on February 27, 2001 provides for automatic citizenship for certain foreign-born children of U.S. citizens. To be eligible, a child must
meet the following requirements:
 The child must have at least one United States citizen parent (by birth or naturalization);The child is under 18 years old;The child has been admitted to the United States as a lawful permanent
resident or has adjusted status;
The child is currently residing perma-nently in the United States in the legal and physical custody of the U.S. citizen  parent.The law also applies to adopted chil-dren provided they meet the above-re-quirements. As to the legal custody re-quirement, the USCIS presumes that the U.S. citizen parent has “legal custody” in cases where the child is a legitimate or legitimated child. For those children who meet the requirements, citizenship is acquired automatically by operation of law on the day of admission to the United States as an immigrant or on the day the last condition for acquiring
citizenship is satised. There is no need
to apply for naturalization. However, if the child wants evidence of his U.S. citizenship he can either apply for a U.S.  passport with the Department of State or
for a Certicate of Citizenship with the
USCIS. To illustrate, let us take the case of 25 year old Mateo who was born in the Philippines in 1985. At the time of his birth, his parents were not married. Subsequent to his birth, Mateo’s father
who was a beneciary of a family-based  petition led by Mateo’s grandparent
immigrated to the United States. A few years later, his father returned to the Philippines, married his mother and im-
mediately led an immigrant petition for
Mateo and the mother. In 1994 Mateo’s father became a naturalized U.S. citizen. When, Mateo was 11 years old he came to the United States as a lawful perma-nent resident with his mother. During the Labor Day weekend, Mateo had one drink too many at his cousin’s house. While driving erratically on his way home, he noticed a police car following him. In his fear of getting caught drink-ing and driving he tried to elude the po-
lice before he was nally apprehended.
Mateo now faces criminal charges of DUI and evading the police. Mateo is worried that he may be deported due to
the criminal charges led against him.
Fortunately, for Mateo he is already a U.S. citizen and thus cannot be deported from the United States. Mateo auto-matically became a U.S. citizen when the Child Citizenship Act of 2000 took effect in February 27, 2001. At that time, he met all the requirements for automatic citizenship, he was admit-ted to the United States as a permanent resident, he had one U.S. citizen parent, he resided in the United States in the  physical and legal custody of his parents and he was under the age of 18 when the law took effect. Atty. Jean S. Tinsay is a partner in the Law Firm of Chua Tinsay and Vega
(CTV) - a full service law rm with ofces in San Francisco, San Diego
and Manila. The information presented in this article is for general informa-tion only and is not, nor intended to be, formal legal advice nor the formation of an attorney-client relationship. Call or e-mail CTV for an in-person or phone consultation to discuss your particular situation and/or how their services may  be retained at (415) 495-8088; (619)
955-6277; jtinsay@ctvattys.com
 Automatic Citizenship
 born every day.
In 2013, the National Statistical Coor-
dination Board estimated the country’s
 population to be around 97.35 million. In 2010, the population was at 92.34 million and 88.55 million in 2007.Perez said 100 symbolic babies would  be chosen from participating hospitals in 80 provinces and cities across the country. These hospitals must go on Philippine standard time.“One hundred local government units will be determining who was born
closest to 12:06 a.m. They will provide
some support while we, at PopCom will  provide some starter kits. We hope that PhilHealth (Philippine Health Insurance Corp.) will be able to give the babies
 personal identication number,” he told
The STAR.Headlines ( Article MRec ), page-
match: 1, sectionmatch: 1
Popcom is working with PhilHealth for the babies to be given lifetime health insurance coverage.
Benchmark 
Perez said the country’s 100-million  population could be a “benchmark” for development.“That means that all our development goals will have this as the denominator of development activities for education, health and other services. This gives another perspective to the way we do development,” he said.“Very often, it is only the centers of cities and municipalities where you look at development. Now, we are looking at the fact that the population is now 100 million and that means every one of the 100 million must be part of that
 
Page 3 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.comJuly 25-31, 2014
(Continued from page 1)
Creative Ways to Increase Tourism at the Same Time Supporting Social Enterprises and NGO’s
(Continued from page 2)
Phl population
(Continued from page 1)
 San Diego News
Filipino tourists
Twitter @asianjournal 
SANDAGRegionSANDAGRegion@MidcoastTrolley
Environmental Review of Mid-Coast Trolley Impacts to San Diego Fairy Shrimp
SANDAG has prepared a supplemental environmental document for the Mid-Coast Trolley project that evaluates a previously unidentified impact to San Diego fairy shrimp, a federally listed endangered species. Called the
Mid-Coast Corridor Transit Project Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement/Supplement to the Subsequent Environmental Impact Report
(Supplement), this document discloses project impacts to San Diego fairy shrimp that were detected adjacent to the existing railroad tracks during surveys in 2014. The Supplement also identifies proposed mitigation.
Public Review and Comment — Fairy Shrimp
The Supplement will be available for a 45-day public review and comment period, from July 18 to September 2, 2014.
Comments during this review period must be limited to the analysis of impacts to the San Diego fairy shrimp.
Please visit
www.sandag.org/midcoast
 to view the Supplement and see a list of locations where the hard copy is available for review.
Written comments may be submitted via mail, fax, or email: 
Mail:
Leslie Blanda, Mid-Coast Program Manager SANDAG 401 B Street, Suite 800 San Diego, CA 92101
Email:
midcoast@sandag.org
Fax:
 (619) 699-1905
 Verbal comments may be left on the Mid-Coast Trolley’sdedicated voice mail line at
(619) 595-5620.
For more information about the Mid-Coast Corridor Transit Project, please visit sandag.org/midcoast.
 
SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW OF
MID-COAST TROLLEY IMPACTS TO FAIRY SHRIMP
A team from the Philippine Consulate General in Los Angeles will conduct a Consular Outreach Program in San Di-ego, California on Saturday and Sunday, August 23 & 24, 2014, at the Council of the Philippine American Organizations of San Diego County, Inc. (COPAO) Center, 832 “E” Avenue, National City, CA 91950. Service Hours will be
from 9:00 am – 6:00 pm. The consular
outreach program is being undertaken in cooperation with COPAO.
The following consular services will be
rendered:
1. Applications for Electronic Passport
(ePassport) (Cost: $60), to be returned to the applicant by mail at an additional cost of $6.
2. Applications for the retention and re-acquisition of Philippine citizenship pursuant to Republic Act 9225 or Dual Citizenship
Law (Cost: $50). Oath-taking will be sched
-
uled on the same day for qualied applicants.
3. Applications for Report of Marriage
& Birth (Cost: $25) will be accepted but
this will be processed in Los Angeles and returned to the applicant by mail at an ad-
ditional cost of $6.
4. Application for Overseas Voting.
STRICTLY BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
(by following the applicable scheduling steps  below) AND WITH COMPLETED DOCU-MENTS ONLY. NO WALK-IN APPLI-
CANTS WILL BE ENTERTAINED.
Please indicate on application form – Na-tional City, CA Consular Outreach.
Appointment Scheduling Steps for ePassport Applicants
1. Visit the Philippine Consulate website (www.philippineconsulatela.org) to down-load and accomplish the ePassport applica-tion form; and,2. No later than August 14, 2014 or until the Consulate receives 280 applications,
whichever comes rst, send an advance copy
of the completed ePassport application form and data page (bearing the name and photo) of the expired or expiring passport to the
Consulate (Attn: National City Outreach)  by email: consular.outreach.sd@gmail.
com. Thumbprints (if needed) and signature
must be afxed and all pertinent data on
the application form must be completed.
INCOMPLETE FORMS WILL NOT BE
PROCESSED.
 Note: a. Personal appearance is required in all cases (including applicants who are
Philippine Consular Outreach in San Diego August 23 & 24, 2014
65 years old and above and minors who are below 18 years old). b. Do not bring passport pictures.  Passport pictures are to be taken by the Consulate. c. The applicant must wear decent attire (no sleeveless and/or collarless attire) and without eyeglasses/colored contact lenses. d. No facial piercings allowed.
Appointment Scheduling Steps for Dual Citizenship Applicants
1. Visit the Philippine Consulate website (www.philippineconsulatela.org) and print the Dual Citizenship Application form; 2. Complete the Dual Citizenship Applica-tion form; and, 3. No later than August 14, 2014, or until the Consulate receives 100 applications,
whichever comes rst, send an advance copy
of the completed Dual Citizenship applica-tion form and supporting documents to the
Consulate (Attn: National City Outreach)  by email: consular.outreach.sd@gmail.
com. Other than the thumbprint and photo which will be done on site, all pertinent data on the application form must be completed. Otherwise, incomplete forms will not be  processed.
 Note: 1. Oath-Taking will be scheduled on
the same day for qualied applicants.
2. Applicants should take their oath as  Dual Citizens in DECENT ATTIRE. The Consulate shall refuse oath-taking to ap-
 plicants wearing inappropriate outts such
as sleeveless shirts, skimpy clothes, shorts,  sandos or slippers.
Appointment Scheduling Steps for Re
-
port of Marriage (ROM) & Birth (ROB)
1. Visit the Philippine Consulate website (www.philippineconsulatela.org) and print
the ROM or ROB form; 2. Complete the ROM or ROB form; and,
3. No later than August 14, 2014, send an advance copy (one set only) of the com- pleted form and supporting documents to the
Consulate (Attn: National City Outreach) by email: consular.outreach.sd@gmail.co
m.. Incomplete forms will not be processed.
Information For All Applicants
The Consulate regularly updates the ap- pointment schedule posted on the website upon receipt of completed applications. The
nal list of all applicants with conrmed
appointment schedule will be posted at the Consulate’s website (www.philippinecon-sulatela.org) by August 20, 2014. All applicants are required to PERSON-ALLY APPEAR during their appointment
time for data verication, nger printing
and photo/signature capture and must bring all original documents. All applicants are advised to transact their business directly
with Consulate ofcials and not through
travel agencies.
Fees
Fees must be paid in person at the sched-uled appointment. The Consulate will only accept payments in cash, postal money order or cashier’s check. Personal checks will not  be accepted. Payments should be paid di-
rectly to the collecting ofcer/cashier of the
Consulate during the outreach program and inside the venue only. Please be informed that the Consulate has not authorized other  people or entities to collect fees for all con-sular services rendered.
- ePassport: $60 processing fee + $6 for
 passports to be returned to the applicant by mail
- Dual Citizenship: $50 processing fee - Civil Registry: $25 processing fee + $6
for documents to be returned to the applicant  by mail
Contact Information
For information on consular matters, interested parties may contact the Consul-ate at 213-639-0980 (for passport applica-
tions), 213-637-3023 (for Reports of Birth/
Marriage/Death & Legalization/Notariza-tion of Documents), 213-637-3023 (for Dual-Citizenship) and (213) 637-3024 (for Overseas Absentee Voting). For information on the venue and similar details, contact Den Dominguez at 619-477-4090.
SAN DIEGO (July 23, 2014) An interest list is now forming for home- buyers interested in new townhome living in San Diego’s thriving South
Bay. Pardee Homes anticipates a grand
opening in Fall 2014 at Seaview Terrace in Ocean View Hills, which is close to freeway access to downtown San Diego.
Home shoppers can join the interest list
and receive VIP preview information by visiting www.pardeehomes.com or call-ing (858) 342-8797.Seaview Terrace by Pardee Homes will include 40 two-story townhomes
and will feature two oor plans with
two-bay garages and a range of three to four bedrooms, two and one-half baths and square footage from approximately
1,549 to 1,713. Both plans will have
master bedrooms thoughtfully placed in
the front wing of the second oor with
spacious walk-in closets and a luxurious  bathroom with oval soaking tub and a separate shower. Plan 2 will offer the option of a fourth bedroom, loft or nurs-ery. Pricing is anticipated to be from the
low $300,000s.
“With sea views, fresh design and money-saving features, we anticipate interest will be strong for this exciting new collection of homes in the South
Bay,” said Matt Sauls, regional director
of marketing for Pardee Homes. “These stylish townhomes will offer great room living, welcoming front entry patios and gourmet kitchens with convenient prep-aration islands and pantries. In addition,
the light-lled open space, adaptable oor plans for exible living and walk 
-able neighborhood close to schools and shopping will make Seaview Terrace an incredible place to live.”Seaview Terrace will include Pardee’s eco-friendly LivingSmart® program with energy-saving and earth-friendly measures to improve indoor quality of life. The exclusive LivingSmart®  brand, with standard and optional
measures, boosts energy-efciency,
saves water, improves indoor air quality
Interest List Forming for New Townhomes in South Bay; Seaview Terrace by Pardee Homes Coming Fall 2014
and encourages material conservation and the use of recycled or sustainable resources.
Ideally located just south of down
-town San Diego, Seaview Terrace is
 just off Otay Mesa Road and close
to Interstates 805 and 905, providing
residents with easy access to South Bay  beaches, Baja California and downtown
San Diego.Pardee Homes celebrates 60 years of homebuilding in San Diego this
year and is noted for energy-efcient
 building practices, quality construction, customer satisfaction and dedication to the educational and civic goals of the communities in which it builds. Pardee
Homes was one of the rst builders
in San Diego to embrace sustainable  building practices and continues to build consideration for the planet into every home and community. For more information visit www. pardeehomes.com or (858) 342-8797
or nd Pardee Homes on Facebook at
www.fb.com/pardeehomessandiego .
do, as tourists or hosts and  become potential supporters for a social enterprise or any favorite NGO. The possibili-ties of creating opportunities and wealth might be unlimited
 by just changing how we do
things when we travel and spend our precious dollars or dinars or pesos.
As a businessman with sev-eral decades of active involvement in
non-prot organizations, like Rotary
International, that has afforded me to travel and visit other cities and coun-tries in the world, I have seen a lot, learned much, especially when I wear my analytical cap as marketing person and entrepreneur while conversing with many people of diverse backgrounds and culture. Many of our travels have resulted into closer friendships in other cities or foreign countries, in addition to the traditional cultural and educational
 benets, especially the times when we
have availed of Rotary International’s “International Travel and Hosting Fel-lowship” (www.ithf.org) where I have  been a member for many years. The
 primary objectives of this RI fellowship
is to foster camaraderie and friendships through tourism and hosting privileges among its thousands of members. With
common objectives, we as members can
 pre-arrange to be the home stay guests or hosts of fellow Rotarians at any-time, anywhere where those Rotarians reside. My wife and I have been guests in other Rotarians’ homes in Japan, England, Mexico and in the Philippines. Likewise, we have also been the hosts of several Rotarians in our Orange County, Southern California home, which is not far from the ‘Happiest Place on Earth, called Disneyland, the last couple of decades.I have had memorable experiences traveling through this non-traditional route where few tourists do. For in-stance, I have been a home stay guests  by some Rotarians in a few countries, where we were not obligated to pay the hosts. However, as a token of our deep appreciation I have voluntarily leave some money in an envelope with a brief letter of thanks, and suggestions that the money is to support the local Rotarians’
community or vocational projects. That
money would have been spent, anyway, in the hotel and local restaurants that
exist mainly to make prots for the
owners and stockholders. I was quite certain that although the donation was not expected, it resulted into a good source of funds to support or subsidize
The Metamorphosis
 Read Ernie Deln’s previous articles by visiting our website at www.asianjournalusa.com
by Ernie Delfn
their Rotary Club’s community projects. Two obvious benets from this transac
-
tion or gift may include: good and
lasting friendship between the guest and the host, possible “savings” for
the guests, additional nancial sup
- port to local Rotarian’s community or
vocational projects, at the expense of
the commercial hotel that never received a penny from this home stay and hosting  program of Rotary. ******With that personal anecdote as a  background, this traveller-writer and humanitarian-adventurer has been thinking more and more how we, as tourists, can create and cause deeper or
lasting benets to the communities of
 both the tourist-guests and their hosts. The results of my informal experiments during my travels led me to believe that
it might work with the inux of people
who will participate, with an effective marketing that highlights some poten-
tial benets and recommended proto
-cols. It can happen one person, one tourist, one host participating one at a time, in any one place, anywhere where willing participants travel. Allow me
to elaborate:
Through the tools of 21st century
social media, especially Face Book or
Twitter, a member of this group (for our discussion purposes, tentatively called World Wide Tourism for Social Purposes or WWT4SP) places his “wish list” in the WWT4SP website to visit and be hosted in another city or country at such a date and for how long. With hundreds or thousand of members (that are listed in the website’s restrict-ed page that can only be accessed with a members password) there is a great likelihood that a member or members will be interested to respond to get more information that may lead to an informal “contract” as recommended in the WWT4SP’s Code of Conduct and Protocol (CCP).The CCP may strongly recommend that the home stay guests agree to pay at least half of the “average” bed and  breakfast costs or hotel charges (like Embassy Suites in the USA that pro-vides complimentary breakfast to their registered guests), to the WWT4SP Social Fund to be disbursed according to agreed percentages later on.
Let’s put some imaginary gures.
Embassy Suites in a region in the
United States, for instance, charges $200
a night for a double occupancy. The homestay guests will then pay at least
$100 for each bed and breakfast night
in the hosts’ home or guest house. Just assuming that the guests (as previously arranged) will stay 5 days, the WWT4SP
Social Fund will receive $500 (saving the homestay guests $500 if he were to
 book his stay in the Embassy Suites). The Social Fund can then disburse 50% to the hosts to compensate for his time, energy and related expenses (that MAY even include picking his guests from the airport or train station and driving him around, although NOT required in this  proposed WWT4SP program)
In this example, $500 is received
 by the Social Fund, that will disburse
half or $250 to the hosts to partially
compensate for his time, energy and
home expenses for those ve days. The other half or $250, after allocating 10%
to 20%, may be, for administration, website, marketing and advertising to expand the program, will be chan-
neled to support, subsidize or nance
social enterprises in the hosts or guests countries, as approved by an Executive Committee upon the suggestions or recommendations from the hosts/guests who have participated in this WWT4SP  program. * * * *Today, as it is still free to dream, I am dreaming that this outside-the-box idea, can have hundreds if not thousand of tourists ( in the future) to participate, and if only 500 guests per year pay
$500 (while saving $500, in our ex
-
ample) that is a whopping $2,500,000 that will leave $ 1,250,000 million to the
Social Fund “Community Fund” that can be used to fund, subsidize some
worthy social project in the hosts’ and
guests’ home country. In the Philip- pines, that is a lot of pesos, that is over
50 million pesos! that can start several livelihood projects, subsidizes or builds a few Gawad Kalinga housing project
for the poor, and help educate poor but deserving children to become useful
citizens!The possibilities can be endless! The
question or challenge NOW, is how many of the readers of this column will
say, “LET’S DO IT”!
As we are already doing it in a very informal manner, I am dreaming that
through this column and in Face Book and social media, especially FaceBook,
FaceTime or Twitter hundreds or thousands more will try it and then par-ticipate regularly and thereby converting millions of tourism dollars into a social or community fund to support, subsidize or fund some worthy social enterprises in our communities.
 PHOTO: (Page 1) District Governor
and ofcers of the Rotary Club Inter 
-national gathered in the Royal Country Club in Walnut/Roland Hills CA for the induction/demotion ceremony of the Global Kalinga e-Rotary Club. They were joined by a delegation from Club  Rotario of Rosarito.
ers.DFA previously raised alert level 4 in Gaza Strip, the center of the ongoing
conict between Hamas and Israel and the area where majority of the estimated
300 casualties come from.
Both sides have red rockets at each
other leading to a large number of casu-alties and destroyed homes, particularly on the side of the Palestinians. Israel’s “Iron Dome” missile and artillery defense system has been successful in
intercepting rockets red from Gaza.
development,” he said.
He added people and not only infrastruc-ture should be at the center of growth and development.He stressed the need to address the “high dependency ratio” of the non-working popu-lation on workers to cope with the soaring  population.“We know that people in production are
Inquirer.net | WASHINGTON, DC — Ten young Filipino-American “change-makers” from all over the US are in the Philippines from July 24 to 28 as  participants in the prestigious Filipino-American Youth Leadership Program (FYLPro).The delegates were selected in rec-ognition of the work they are doing to advance the welfare of their respective Filipino-American communities, among other criteria,” according to the Depart-ment of Foreign Affairs (DFA).
This year’s delegates are:
Edward Aparis (Chula Vista, California) – Consultant at the Strands GroupRyyn Chua (Gardena, California) – Found-er and CEO of Double Y EntertainmentRommel Clemente (Milpitas, California) – Supervising Senior Associate for the Connor Group
Adette Contreras (Brooklyn, New York)
 – Creative Director at Saatchi & Saatchi, Co-Founder and Partner at Tinsel & TwineMichael Dahilig (Lihue, Hawaii) – Direc-tor of the Department of Planning at the County of Kauai in Hawaii
Rafael Diokno (Washington, D.C.) – Proj
-ect Lead at SGT, Inc.,Abbey Eusebio (Lincolnwood, Illinois)
 – Constituent Advocate at the Ofce of US
Representative Jan SchakowskyJan Paul Ferrer (Tinley Park, Illinois) – Associate Vice President at Morgan StanleyRyan Letada (New York, New York) –
CEO and co-founder of Next Day Better
Inc.,Jason Tengco (Washington, D.C.) – Senior Advisor at the White House Initiative on
Asian Americans and Pacic Islanders
FYLPro is an annual weeklong immer-sion program in the Philippines designed to give the delegates a chance to interact with government, industry and thought leaders in the country, and get hands-on experience in development initiatives.The program, the brainchild of Philippine Ambassador to the US Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. and his wife, Vicky, was a direct result of the Ambassador’s efforts to engage and interact with young Filipino-Americans, who, he observed, had begun to take groundbreak-
ing initiatives that were raising the prole
and awareness of the unique needs of the Filipino-American community and Filipinos in the US.
“I rmly believe it is vital that the next
generation of Filipino-Americans be in-volved in the affairs of their communities,” Cuisia said.Launched in July 2012 in partnership with the Ayala Foundation, FYLPro taps the Phil-ippine Embassy and Philippine Consulates in the United States to identify 10 outstanding young Filipino-American leaders who have great potential in pushing Philippines-US relations forward.Following the program, the delegates are expected to maintain ties with the Philippine Embassy or the nearest Consulate, to work
on projects that will elevate awareness of the
Philippines, and strengthen the Filipino-American communities in their areas, and champion Philippine initiatives in the US.Past FYLPro delegates have gone on to undertake cultural and tourism promotion  programs, social entrepreneurship activities, education innovations, Filipino-American
heritage projects, voter awareness and educa
-tion programs, political advocacies and some have even launched political campaigns of their own.“I have always anticipated much from the delegates, and they often exceeded our expectations,” Cuisia said.The FYLPRO 2014 delegates will be shar-ing their experiences through social media. To track their progress through this year’s  program, search for #FYLPRO2014 and #FYLPRO.
 Young Fil-Am leaders in PH for ‘immersion’
not enough and there are too many people who depend on workers. Right now, the ratio is 65 percent working, while 30 to 35 percent are dependents. That is not a good ratio,” he said.PopCom said there should be at least one dependent for every two people who are working. If a worker is working not only for himself but also for his dependent, he would likely end up having no savings.PopCom is also looking at addressing the rising teenage pregnancy in the country. – With Evelyn Macairan

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