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The Intellectual Solitude of Christ.

The Intellectual Solitude of Christ.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
G. CALTHROP,


Who is this . Matthew xxi. lo.

USUALLY when a great man appears there is something in his age
or education that will in some measure account for his pre-
eminence. But there was nothing in the Palestine of His day that
can in any degree explain the excellence of Christ. The noblest
thinkers of the world have not been isolated peaks, standing out in
solitary grandeur from some level plain. Rather they have been, so
to say, the highest summit of a mountain range of great ones. But
Christ stood alone.
G. CALTHROP,


Who is this . Matthew xxi. lo.

USUALLY when a great man appears there is something in his age
or education that will in some measure account for his pre-
eminence. But there was nothing in the Palestine of His day that
can in any degree explain the excellence of Christ. The noblest
thinkers of the world have not been isolated peaks, standing out in
solitary grandeur from some level plain. Rather they have been, so
to say, the highest summit of a mountain range of great ones. But
Christ stood alone.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jul 27, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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The Intellectual Solitude of Christ. G. CALTHROP, Who is this . Matthew xxi. lo. USUALLY when a great man appears there is something in his age or education that will in some measure account for his pre- eminence. But there was nothing in the Palestine of His day that can in any degree explain the excellence of Christ. The noblest thinkers of the world have not been isolated peaks, standing out in solitary grandeur from some level plain. Rather they have been, so to say, the highest summit of a mountain range of great ones. But Christ stood alone. From The Limitations of Life, Who is this ? Who is this ^ S. Matthew xxi. lo. THE thought which the narrative suggests is this — that, whenever Jesus enters into the life of men, and comes distinctly before them — it is impossible for them to pass the subject by with absolute 34 OUTLIES O THE GOSPEL indifference, but that they are compelled to make inquiry about Him. In other words, the question of our text is sure to be asked, wherever the Gospel is preached, although the spirit in which it is asked may be different in different cases. I. The spirit differs. In the mouths of some people the question is one of a simple curiosity. It can hardly be disputed that the most remarkable figure in human history is that of Jesus of azareth. Some persons, when they ask the question of our text, 'Who is this ?^
 
are prompted, simply and solely, by a spirit of curiosity. II. But there are others who ask the question under the influence of another motive — the motive of dislike. ' Who is this that assumes so much ? that claims the disposal of our persons, ay, and the control of our very thoughts ? Who gave Him this authority ? and by what right does He presume thus to lord it over us ? ' And such was the feeling of not a few of those who witnessed the entry of the Saviour into Jerusalem. The ruling ecclesiastical party of the day, if at first they thought Jesus a harmless enthusiast, soon began to entertain very serious misgivings about Him. What this led to we very well know. It led to the Cross of Calvary ; and the first deep mutterings of the coming storm were heard in the streets of the Holy City, when the scribes and Pharisees — as Jesus passed along calmly on the ass's colt — asked, ' Who is this that permits Himself to be saluted as the King that cometh in the name of the Lord?' Men sometimes entertain a sort of resentment against the Saviour on account of the exacting nature of the demands which He makes. It is this resentment which keeps them hovering on the outside fringe of the Christian Church, not daring altogether to break with Christ, to renounce His allegiance, and to cast off His yoke, and yet, on the other hand, not willing to render that entire and unreserving submis- sion with which alone He will be satisfied. Or, to phrase it in other words, there are cases in which the question — 'Who is this?' — is a question implying recoil from the Saviour's demands, and in virtual, if not an avowed, resistance to the authority which He claims to exercise over the children of men. III. In the third place, the question of our text is one which is frequently prompted by an earnest desire to know more about the Lord Jesus Christ. It was so, I doubt not, in the crowd that stood round the procession as it wound its way through the streets of Jerusalem. In their case, the question, ' Who is this ?' would not be one of a lazy and indifferent curiosity, much less one of an incipient suspicion and dislike ; but it would be the outcome of a true wish to be more deeply taught of God, and to understand more clearly the things which concerned their everlasting peace. There are every-

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