Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Meditations for Writers

Meditations for Writers

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3|Likes:
Published by Sally Morem
If you ever have trouble with writer's block, try some of these meditations. This is a highly unusual list. You may not write the Great American Novel while doing these, but you will write.
If you ever have trouble with writer's block, try some of these meditations. This is a highly unusual list. You may not write the Great American Novel while doing these, but you will write.

More info:

Published by: Sally Morem on Jul 30, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/01/2015

pdf

text

original

 
 
Meditations for Writers
By Sally Morem
o
 
Set yourself up for creative thoughts. When at the computer, do
something else that’s rather boring.
Stare at the wall or the floor. Type in any strong thoughts relating to a writing project that pop into mind.
o
 
Learn to appreciate and create unexpected connections between two or more apparently unconnected things or actions.
o
 
Use your undirected stream of consciousness to generate novel thoughts and insights. Write all of them down.
o
 
Play restful space music while brainstorming writing ideas. This will give your mind soft focus conducive to the flow of ideas.
o
 
Sharply focused thought helps us to perceive what is similar in a wide assortment of things. Use it when studying a massive amount of material on your subject.
o
 
Soft focus makes available many aspects of one thing. Use it when generating novel ideas.
o
 
Sharp focus = Abstract thought
o
 
Soft focus = Concrete thought
o
 
Sharp focus = Enlightenment thought
o
 
Soft focus = Romantic thought
o
 
Consider Isaiah
Berlin’s writings on Roma
nticism and combine them with these insights on sharp and soft focus.
o
 
Consider creative thinking as a push-pull beat of sharp and soft thoughts. Examining many thoughts by one criterion, then one thought by many criteria. Alternate slowly. Alternate rapidly between the two modes.
o
 
With regard to sharp and soft, what is mental modeling of the world? Creating images in the brain that resemble things in the real world. Thinking then becomes remembering what these things have in common
 
with one another
and 
 how many aspects one thing has that makes it that thing and not another thing. Mental modeling is found in sharp focus, and is found far less in soft focus.
o
 
What sorts of memories will arise when you read one word, or two, or three? Find out. Draw out random words from a hat, or point to words on a page in a book chosen at random. Write down anything that comes to mind. When focusing on two or three words, see how you can combine them to bring other words to mind.
o
 
One book on creativity urged the thinker to use words as “bait” in a fishing
expedition for memories, ones that can be used as aids to creativity.
o
 
Metaphor: A linkage between unrelated thoughts.
o
 
Metaphoric thinking occurs much more often in soft focus.
o
 
Similar states of emotion can be much more potent sources of poetic metaphor than similar ideas.
o
 
Try this out. Think of a time in which you experienced a very specific emotion. Then write a poem about that emotion in a very different context. Write a poem about two very different contexts with the same emotional content.
o
 
Perhaps a poem, or one line in a poem, is so well written, rendered so that the exact emotion conveyed by the poet is experienced by the reader. This is a successful poem.
o
 
Read Wordsworth’s Tinturn Abbey, “the affections gently lead us on.”
 
o
 
Read Keats. Study his use of emotion. Write poems based on the emotion
content only, not on Keats’ specifics.
 
o
 
Emotions are far more resonant in soft focus. Use soft focus on one very specific form of emotion. See what images come to mind, but not at your bidding.
o
 
When I’m on my computer writing, I’m by
 necessity too sharp-focused in
my thoughts. I have too strong a sense that I’m supposed to be writing
something that is well thought out, hard-edged, sharp-focused, logical,
complete. I resist that discipline. I don’t write as much as I’d like because
this annoys me so much. Instead, I should get used to being here, on the
 
computer, plunging in with words that flow from the soft-focused brain. The best form of gaming ever invented.
o
 
Find good definitions of “emotion” in online dictionaries, both general and
medical in nature. Use them to generate ideas about the nature of emotion.
o
 
Find hundreds of synonyms of different emotions listed online and in my own dictionary. Find as many synonyms as possible. Each one will be slightly different, meaning different shades of emotions. Create a list. Generate your own ideas; add them to the list. Go through the list and pull out the most interesting, unusual emotions. Write poems about these.
o
 
An emotion is a complex state: mind and body changes, breathing, focus, thoughts, face, pulse, sphincter, tears, glands, excitement, perturbations, tenseness, relaxed posture. Think about your body when studying an emotion word.
o
 
There are such things as aesthetic emotions. Viewing a painting. Listening to music. Seeing color. Feeling texture. Eating food. Seeing shadows at different times of the day. A bright sunny day as opposed to dark cloudy.
o
 
Subtle emotions seem to emerge in a room, as you stand amid certain people.
o
 
Walking along a dirt road on the first warm sunny spring day with my light  jacket tied around my waist, wearing white blouse, bright white skirt with flowers, going home at lunch time from school. It
s an old, old memory fragment. Use memory fragments to meditate by, to write by.
o
 
Hunger for food, for adventure, for love, for a new book to buy, an aching looking-forward to something or some event.
o
 
A particular emotion that goes with one particular scene in memory. A visual emotion, a sound emotion, an aroma emotion, taste, touch.
o
 
Idiosyncratic emotions that grow right out of a certain personality
o
 
That aghast feeling immediately after doing something and realizing it was an embarrassment to you.
o
 
There are no names for most of our very particular, personal, idiosyncratic emotions, we merely experience them
and don’t try to describe them. This
is what poetry is for

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->