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The Christian's Conquest Over the Body of Sin.

The Christian's Conquest Over the Body of Sin.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. JEREMY TAYLOR, D. D.,


For the good that 1 would I do not: but the evil
which 1 would not, that I do.— Rom. vii. 19.
BY REV. JEREMY TAYLOR, D. D.,


For the good that 1 would I do not: but the evil
which 1 would not, that I do.— Rom. vii. 19.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jul 31, 2014
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THE CHRISTIA'S COQUEST OVER THE BODY OF SI. BY REV. JEREMY TAYLOR, D. D., For the good that 1 would I do not: but the evil which 1 would not, that I do.— Rom. vii. 19. What the eunuch said to Philip, when he read the book of the prophet Isaiah, * 2 Sam. ii. 18. t Song of Sol vi. \%, '' Of whom speaketh the prophet this, of himself, or some other man?'' the same question I am to ask concerning the words of my text: Does St. Paul mean this of himself, or of some other? It is hoped that he speak? it of himself; and means, that though his understanding is convinced tha he ought to serve God, and that he hath some imperfect desires to do so, yet the laiv of God without is opposed by a law of sin within. We have a corrupted nature, and a body of infirmity, and our reason dwells in the dark, and we must go out of the world before we leave our sin. For besides that some sins are esteemed brave and ho- nourable, and he is a baffled person that dares not kill his brother like a gentleman ; our very tables are made a snare, and our civilities are direct treasons to the soul. You cannot entertain your friend, but excess is the measure; and that you may be very kind to your guest, you step aside, and lay away the Christian ; your love cannot be ex- pressed, unless you do him an ill turn, and
 
civilly invite him to a fever. Justice is too often taught to bow to great interests, and men canno; live without flattery : and there are some trades that minister to sin, so that without a sin we cannot maintain our fami- lies ; and if you mean to live, you must do as others do. ow so long as men see they are like to be undone by innocence, and that they can no way live but by compliance with the evil customs of the world, men con- clude practically, because they must live, they must sin ; they must live handsomely, and, therefore, must do some things un- handsomely, and so upon the whole matter sin is unavoidable. Fain they would, but cannot tell how to help it. But since it is no better, it is well it is no worse. For it is St. Paul's case, no worse man : he would and he would not, he did and he did not; he was willing, but he was not able ; and, therefore, the case is clear, that if a man strives against sin, and falls unwillingly, it shall not be imputed to him ; he may be a regenerate man for all that. A man must, indeed, wrangle against sin when it comes, and, like a peevish lover, resist and consent at the same time, and then all is well ; for this not only consists with, but is a sign of the state of regeneration. If this be true, God will be very ill served. If it be not true, most men will have bat 6 nail hopes of being saved, because this ii the condition of most men. What then it to be done? Truth can do ui no hurt; and S&KK. 11.
 
OVER THE BODY OF SI 409 therefore, be williag to let this matter pass under examination 3 for if it trouble us now, it will bring comfort hereafter. And, there- fore, before I enter into the main inquiry, I shall, by describing the state of the man of whom St. Paul speaks here, tell you plain- ly, who it is that is in this state of sad things; and then do ye make your resolutions, ac- cording as you shall find it necessary for the saving of your souls, which, I am sure, ought to be the end of all preaching. 1. The man St Paul speaks of, is one that is " dead,"* one that was " deceived" and " slain,"t one in whom " sin was ex- ceeding sinful,"^ that is, highly imputed, greatly malicious, infinitely destructive : he is one who is " carnal, and sold under sin ;"} he is one that sins against his ** conscience and his reason ;"| he is one in whom " sin dwells,^' but the Spirit of God does not dwell ; for " no good thing dwells in him ;"T he is one who is " brought into captivity to the law of sin ;" he is a servant of unclean- ness, with his " flesh and members serving the law of sin."** ow if this be a state of regeneration, I wonder what is, or can be, a state of reprobation! for though this be the state of nature, yet it cannot be the state of one redeemed by the Spirit of Christ;

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