Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
John the Baptis's Testimony to Christ.

John the Baptis's Testimony to Christ.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. FREDERICK WHITFIELD, M.A.,


The most ordinary mind is arrested by objects tbat are
striking. To recognize the band of G-od in tbe jewelled
heavens, or the mighty ocean; to trace it in the grand aroana
of nature around; to ^acknowledge it in the wasting pestilence,
or the sweeping faming, or in some overwhelming and crush-
ing calamity of daily life, men are not unwilling, nor do
they find much difB.culty in doing so. These things force
themselves on the mind without much effort. The most
obtuse cannot fail to understand j the most reluctant are
compelled to pause and reflect. The light shines too
brightly for the darkest vision ; the voice of God rings too
loudly for the deafest ear; the conviction becomes too
powerful for the most rebellious will.
BY REV. FREDERICK WHITFIELD, M.A.,


The most ordinary mind is arrested by objects tbat are
striking. To recognize the band of G-od in tbe jewelled
heavens, or the mighty ocean; to trace it in the grand aroana
of nature around; to ^acknowledge it in the wasting pestilence,
or the sweeping faming, or in some overwhelming and crush-
ing calamity of daily life, men are not unwilling, nor do
they find much difB.culty in doing so. These things force
themselves on the mind without much effort. The most
obtuse cannot fail to understand j the most reluctant are
compelled to pause and reflect. The light shines too
brightly for the darkest vision ; the voice of God rings too
loudly for the deafest ear; the conviction becomes too
powerful for the most rebellious will.

More info:

Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Aug 04, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/04/2014

pdf

text

original

 
JOH THE BAPTIS'S TESTIMOY TO CHRIST. BY REV. FREDERICK WHITFIELD, M.A., The most ordinary mind is arrested by objects tbat are striking. To recognize the band of G-od in tbe jewelled heavens, or the mighty ocean; to trace it in the grand aroana of nature around; to ^acknowledge it in the wasting pestilence, or the sweeping faming, or in some overwhelming and crush- ing calamity of daily life, men are not unwilling, nor do they find much difB.culty in doing so. These things force themselves on the mind without much effort. The most obtuse cannot fail to understand j the most reluctant are compelled to pause and reflect. The light shines too brightly for the darkest vision ; the voice of God rings too loudly for the deafest ear; the conviction becomes too powerful for the most rebellious will. To rest satisfied, however, with this knowledge, is not the mark of one of Q-od's intelligent creatures. He who does so, is not fulfilling the great end of his creation. He is not turning to account the talent which God has given him. To examine, to search diligently, to weigh carefully, to prove satisfactorily, and to turn to good account the results of our labours, is what God enjoins upon us. This marks the loftier intellect, the more exalted mind, and the nobler character. To trace the finger of G-od in what would escape the notice of the ordinary mind ; to read the message of God and listen to 10 JOH THE baptist's the wliisper«of His Spirit in wliat the superficial observer would pass by, or would call ordinary and common-place — this marks the one desirous to advance in the knowledge of God, and to own Him in all things. Such a one feels that there is no medium too trifling through which Qt)d may not, nay does not reveal Himself to man; that there is
 
nothing above, around, or below, that does not unfold some- thing of Ghod's glorious character. From the lowliest insect that gilds the evening air, or the monad that swims unseen in the ocean's drop, or the leaf that falls unnoticed on the pathless, waste, up to the high and glorious being that veils its face before the throne of the Eternal — all have a voice ; all have a message to man ; all are radiant as the sunbeam. Q-od is in all, speaking in all, is glorified in alL " All Thy works praise Thee, Lord ; and Thy saints bless Thee." It is the same with regard to God's vmtten "Word. There are truths in it so plain, so palpable, so striking, that they force themselves vrithout difficulty and without reluctance on the most superficial reader. They shine with transparent lustre on the very surface so that " the wayfaring man and the fool cannot err therein." At times they will arrest the most callous, the most careless and unthinking. It requires no effort to discover them ; no additional light to perceive them. There they are, and if we look at all we cannot fail to perceive. It is not the mark of a mind desirous to ad- vance in the knowledge of God, however, to rest satisfied vnth such knowledge as this. It delights to '' search the Scriptures," to dive beneath the surface and bring to light its hidden treasures, to open the matchless and inexhaustible mine and bear away its hidden gems. And it finds them where the ordinary reader would least anticipate, and in what the superficial reader would altogether overlook. It TESTmOT TO CHEIST. 11 traces them in type and ceremony, in parable and symbol, i in the conversation and the journey, in the incident and the i accident, yea often, the most precious truth and practical wrapped up within the folds of a single word. Such a mind
 
 judges naturally and correctly that there is nothing in that Word that was not designed by the Holy Spirit to unfold God's glorious character, and to exalt the Eedeemer; that " all Scripture is given by inspiration of Q-od, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for in- struction in righteousness ; that the man of Q-od may be perfect, thoroughly furnished to all good worts." Thus the believer who would advance in the divine life searches dili- gently, frequently, and prayerfully, ever keeping the Saviour before his eyes, and reading that Word with only one end in view — ^to see His image reflected in everything. Let us read this portion of Q-od's Word with this purpose, and endeavour to learn from it something that will exalt the Saviour, and instruct our own souls. John the Baptist was a minister of Christ. He is introduced to our notice at the very opening of the Gospel dispensation, as an example of what every minister of Christ ought to be. As to the minister himself, there is no putting forward any undue pretensions to sacredness of character ; no parade, no pomp, no display ; nothing to strike the beholder, or awe the ignorant. He proclaims his mission in few and simple words, " I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness." Mark the himiility of the true ambassador for Christ. Mark how he hides himself in order the more effectually to fulfil his work — " to prepare the way of the Lord." He is only a voice in the wilderness. He seems to say, " I am not to be seen but to be heard. Look not at me but at Him who is before me. 12 JOH THE baptist's Let me be hidden. Let me be nothing, but hear my message  —* Behold the Lamb of God.'" o wonder that God honours such testimonies as his. We are not surprised to hear that the Spirit of God set His seal so remarkably on this man's ministry. We are prepared to hear that " there

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->