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The Agony in the Garden.

The Agony in the Garden.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. FREDERICK WHITFIELD, M.A.


In the great drama of the Savion's agony in the
garden, on which we are ahont to entei^ we can
scarcely fail to perceive thron^ont the nairatiYe the
ceaseless activity of Satan, the great enemy of man-
kind We have scarcely crossed the threshold of
the chapter, ere he appears on the stage. Among
the professedly religious, in the Church of God and
in the world outside, we behold him working with
amazing activity and inconceivable subtlety. He
is seen summoning all his resources, as if for one
last and desperate assault The chief priests and
scribes are first enlisted in his cause; next he
enters the professing Church and draws away
Judas; ho is then seen among the Lord's own
people, filling their minds with ambitious disputings
us to which should be accounted greatest
BY REV. FREDERICK WHITFIELD, M.A.


In the great drama of the Savion's agony in the
garden, on which we are ahont to entei^ we can
scarcely fail to perceive thron^ont the nairatiYe the
ceaseless activity of Satan, the great enemy of man-
kind We have scarcely crossed the threshold of
the chapter, ere he appears on the stage. Among
the professedly religious, in the Church of God and
in the world outside, we behold him working with
amazing activity and inconceivable subtlety. He
is seen summoning all his resources, as if for one
last and desperate assault The chief priests and
scribes are first enlisted in his cause; next he
enters the professing Church and draws away
Judas; ho is then seen among the Lord's own
people, filling their minds with ambitious disputings
us to which should be accounted greatest

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Aug 06, 2014
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THE AGOY I THE GARDE. BY REV. FREDERICK WHITFIELD, M.A. In the great drama of the Sayion/s agony in the garden, on which we are ahont to entei^ we can scarcely fail to perceive thron^ont the nairatiYe the ceaseless activity of Satan, the great enemy of man- kind We have scarcely crossed the threshold of the chapter, ere he appears on the stage. Among the professedly religious, in the Church of God and in the world outside, we behold him working with amazing activity and inconceivable subtlety. He is seen summoning all his resources, as if for one last and desperate assault The chief priests and scribes are first enlisted in his cause; next he enters the professing Church and draws away Judas; ho is then seen among the Lord's own people, filling their minds with ambitious disputings us to which should be accounted greatest ; then he is presented as seized with a vehement desire to poBBOBB them that he may sift th^m ^a vrheat \ he THE AGOY I THE GARDE. 49 fills the mind of one with self-confidence and pride, and ultimately to deny his Lord with an oath; finally, he leads the whole band of disciples captive at his will, by desiring to take in hand the sword, by falling asleep at the very climax of the Saviour's agony, and by utterly forsaking Him when most of all He needed their sympathy and succour. Earely is there to be found in the Word of God a record in which the master spirit of all evil is seen so actively and so variously at work, as the one on which we are about to enter, — Satan's efforts being successful, and his victory decisive and complete
 
over all save One — the Lord Jesus Himself; thus fulfilling His own remarkable words, "The prince of this world cometh, and hath nothing in me." And why is Satan thus seen here so active and energetic as to distinguish it from almost every other record in the Bible? Because by the stupendous act about to be accomplished on the cross, all his work of sin was to be undone and his kingdom overthrown. He had in the beginning of the world blasted all God's workmanship; he had for four thousand years brought mourning, lamentation, and woe on all mankind; he had blighted every fair flower in the paradise of God ; he had swayed the sceptre of the world and retained undisputed possession of the bodies and souls of men, till ondation groaned and travailed in pain beneath hi& so THE AGOY I THE GARDE. iron yoke. Xow, however, that reign was to termi- nate. The sceptre was to fall for ever from the hand of the nsorper, and all his doings of fonr thousand years were to he nndone. The Seed of the woman was ahout to bruise the serpent's head, and to lead captivity captiv& Death was to lose its sting, and the grave its victory. The laurels were to he wrested from the destroyer's grasp, and to be placed on the brow of the despised azarene, and He was to be King of kings and Lord of lords, the Redeemer of man's sinful soul, the Kestorer of man's fallen race, and the Begenerator of a blighted and ruined world. Honce Satan's ceaseless activity. Hence his varied devices. Hence the summoning of every energy in order to mar, if he could not altogether overturn, the grand work of redemption about to be accomplished by the Saviour.
 
"We are told at the opening of the narrative that the Saviour " came out, and went, as He was wont, to the mount of Olives." That mount was the Saviour's oratory. Thither He loved to repaur when the toils of the day were over, or when His tried and suffering spirit needed repose. He loved its quiet retirement ; and there, screened from the rude gaze of men, and from the assaults and temptations of the world, and with naught for His canopy save the darkness of night, did He oft continue till day- break, in communion with His Father. Thither the disciples followed Him, All knew the Saviour's THE AGOY I THE GARDE. 51 predilection for this hallowed spot ; and if at any time He were missing, they conld track His foot- steps to the favoured mount, and there find Him engaged in intercourse with heaven. Its caverns and verdant slopes had often echoed back the Saviour's cries. The trees and flowers that studded so thickly its banks — yea, the very breezes that swept silently by, had they a tongue to speak, could bear testimony to the travail of His souL And as He now entered it for the last time on earth, — save as a conqueror rising triumphant from the grave, borne upward in His cloudy chariot to heaven amid the hosts of assembled angels, — each stone and rock and tree, each slope and cavern on the mountain- side, seem to re-echo the first words from His lips, "Pmy" — "pray that ye enter not into tempta- tion." It is thus the Saviour sets before us the Divine preservative from temptation — prayer. That hour of temptation was now at hand. It surrounded His path like a dark shadow, and He went, " as He

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