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Christ and the Working-man

Christ and the Working-man

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY Rev. Louis Albert Banks, D.D.



*' Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden,
and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, an
learn of me, for I am meek and lowly of heart, and ye shall
find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my
burden is light.** — Matt U. 28-30.
BY Rev. Louis Albert Banks, D.D.



*' Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden,
and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, an
learn of me, for I am meek and lowly of heart, and ye shall
find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my
burden is light.** — Matt U. 28-30.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Aug 10, 2014
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CHRIST AD THE WORKIG-MABY Rev. Louis Albert Banks, D.D.*' Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, an<? learn of me, for I am meek and lowly of heart, and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.** — Matt U. 28-30. WHAT is Christianity worth to Boston? That is the question we are to ask and pon- der in this series of discourses. What is Chris- tianity doing to make the lives of men and women and children happier and nobler than they would be without it? The question is not, what has Christianity done for the race at large, not what impulse has it given to civilization in general, but rather, what is it doing to help the phases of human need that present themselves to the people of Boston, in the year of our Lord 1890 ? The appeal must be to the facts. When the disciples of John came to Jesus, desiring to know if he was the Messiah, he threw them back upon the facts which appealed to their own eyes and ears : " Go show John the things ye do see 1 The three following discourses were delivered in a series of sermons on '* Christianity in Boston." 82 THE people's CHRIST and hear ; the blind receive their sight, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead arc raised up, and the poor have the gospel preached unto them." The appeal must be the same to-day. We must search the living facts, and not past traditions, for the answer. Every age must produce its own evidences of Chris- tianity. I invite you, for a few Sunday evenings, to
 
pursue with me a frank and earnest investiga- tion of the evidences of Christianity; not as they appear in the learned tomes of the scholar's library, but as they appear in the churches, homes, schools, workshops, hospitals, and com- plicated network of the daily life of the people that make up this bustling human hive which we call Boston. Coming then to our first theme, " Christ and the Working-man," I invite you to notice the daring invitation of Jesus to the toilers of earth : " Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me, for I am meek and lowly of heart, and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light." That was a brave challenge. Jesus stood in the midst of the burden-bearers of Palestine. The majority, there as everywhere, were poor GHBIST AD THE WOBKIG-MA 88 working people. Jesus looked over this crowd of burden-bearers — women with heavy water-pot^ on shoulder or head, men bending under loads of fuel or fish or merchandise, people who knew what burdens meant, and what it was to be tired from overloading — and he uttered this bold challenge. They were words of real prophecy, if - you take them in the most earthly and literal sense only. Think of it as you go out into the street to-night, as you look up through the clear white electric light, and consider how much better it is for the laboring men of Boston to have the benefit of that splendid illumination, rather than to be compelled to carry each man - \'^ "'-^ his own torch, or his little lamp fastened around his ankle, that he may find his path through the darkness. Think of it when you enter your home, and open the faucet, and the pure water bursts out of the wall at your touch, as it burst from the desert rock of old, under the rod of
 
Moses. Think of it, and thank God for the challenge of Jesus I The miracles of Judaea are the every-day expe- rience of Christian Boston. But remember, it is only the cities which have come under the touch of Christianity, that have made these giant strides in the arts of life. Let us look around us, and see in what other way Christ is manifesting his sympathy with the working-men of Boston. 34 THE people's chbist Here, for example, is a young man who came down last week from the old farm in Vermont, or from the carpenter shop in St. John, . B., and it may be, for the sake of the dear name of your old town, that you are half homesick for, you have come in here to St. John's Church to- night. You are to be a working-man in Boston. You have your two hands, your honest purpose, and your clean blood, inherited from good, hon- est, hard-working parents, for capital. Don't undervalue that capital. Franklin, Lincoln, Garfield, Grant, and a host of others, have stored up an inexhaustible bank account with the American people, with no other capital to begin with than that. You are here to face the new world of the city, to earn your bread, to win a home, to live your life, to do the best for yourself, to fill your place in your age. ow what does Christianity do to meet you as a young working-man, that ought to attract your attention, awaken your interest, and arouse your gratitude ? Well, in the first place, my brother, Christianity has built this church, lighted it with welcome, and hung its cards of invitation on the streets, that you might see them an<| come in« It stationed me in the corridor, that, ^ jflie very threshold, you might have a hand-shaj^ /of. brotherhood and a word of cheer. It stations sa^ i^ t}^ pulpit, and the

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