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Commentary I

Commentary I

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Relates to the first Scotland lesson, Lesson Three, about the Old Man of Stoer; and builds on a knowledge of Romance Languages instilled in Lesson Four. I say instilled. For distilled, see lesson Four, last paragraph....
Relates to the first Scotland lesson, Lesson Three, about the Old Man of Stoer; and builds on a knowledge of Romance Languages instilled in Lesson Four. I say instilled. For distilled, see lesson Four, last paragraph....

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Published by: Martin Francis Moverley Smith on Aug 10, 2014
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08/11/2014

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Commentary I: Lighting a Candle
c andles is a hard k
letter c
- only before
e
and
 i
 is it soft
and pronounced as
letter s 
c elebrity 
 
c elebration C inderella  c inders Notice that this set of words is LatinFrench LF or Romance, meaning from the Roman civilization. We  will abbreviate this
 R) or R ch
can also be
hard k
 in ch aracter ch aracteristic ..  ASG (Anglo-Saxon-Germanic) words in c
like can
are
hard 
 
.
 
* depatchd
relatives was a good try. Yes
 it is a (R)  word. Look at the granularity: even. bacaC+d in your  version ; and d e p a r t e d [correctly] baca C ad :  very even. Especially notice ed the ending and de 
the starting ‘prepositional segment’.
  A preposition is a short word indicating the dynamic relation of two things. On the table, beside the pencil is the ruler. In (R) words these are often
short
two-letter combinations such as de- in- un- re- con-   When you see them, the  very next thing in the word gets the stress, and then the word makes no further effort to be stressed at all and will shorten itself as far as English allows.
 
de PART ch* de PART td` - I put in the * symbol to show a soft continuing sound and the ` to indicate a slightly harder, sharper one from the tongue at the
end of ‘departed’. ‘
re
latives’ too, is exactly the same,
but seems the opposite at first. It is (R). It has a re- at the start which would have no stress if it was in the head word, the verb, reLATE
but another thing about R words is that the stress can move forward  on nouns formed from verbs or adverbs 
 
 examples: relatively, re lat ive
 pronounced at normal speed RE-
L tiv ,
RE-
L
 
tiv li
Here I am not following the dictionaries and putting in any other small symbols. The word just stops, a bit suddenly and softly
 almost whispered
 but English is like that. Look at the granularity
 
and at the ‘surprise value’
 of a word
 the rate of change from one element to the next, how well the word flows, really
 and you will see that relative relatively departure departed are all R  while knell bell quick run are ASG. ASG words can be short, but usually have some drama in them. And

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