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Worley course syllabus for Eng 204, Fall 2014

Worley course syllabus for Eng 204, Fall 2014

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Published by Paul Worley
From the course description:
In this section of the Literature of Culture we will be reading texts that seek to bear witness, inviting the reader not just to acknowledge a variety of economic, social, political, and cultural ills, but also to change how she goes about her daily life. These texts, then, deal directly with moral reflection and cultural diversity. While notions of witness may entail legal and cultural forms of truth, particularly with regard to why the reader would/would not enact the real-world changes sought by the text, these texts nonetheless complicate how we relate to historical events, times, and places. To what extent are the universal truths of human rights and human dignity more important than the historical occurrences that befall a particular individual? In making arguments for sweeping change, why do such texts often elide the individual stories of their authors in order to highlight the more general condition of the author’s social/ethnic/economic/racial class? How do moments of fiction actually bring us closer to the truth than the factual recording of events? How do our own ideas of truth prejudice our readings of these texts? What factors complicate the production of these texts with regard to authority, writing, and their potential reception? Does who reads in the end matter just as much as who’s doing the writing?
From the course description:
In this section of the Literature of Culture we will be reading texts that seek to bear witness, inviting the reader not just to acknowledge a variety of economic, social, political, and cultural ills, but also to change how she goes about her daily life. These texts, then, deal directly with moral reflection and cultural diversity. While notions of witness may entail legal and cultural forms of truth, particularly with regard to why the reader would/would not enact the real-world changes sought by the text, these texts nonetheless complicate how we relate to historical events, times, and places. To what extent are the universal truths of human rights and human dignity more important than the historical occurrences that befall a particular individual? In making arguments for sweeping change, why do such texts often elide the individual stories of their authors in order to highlight the more general condition of the author’s social/ethnic/economic/racial class? How do moments of fiction actually bring us closer to the truth than the factual recording of events? How do our own ideas of truth prejudice our readings of these texts? What factors complicate the production of these texts with regard to authority, writing, and their potential reception? Does who reads in the end matter just as much as who’s doing the writing?

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Published by: Paul Worley on Aug 15, 2014
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English 204 Section 1 The Literature of Culture: The Literature of Witness
Fall 2014 Coulter 204 1:25-2:15 Instructor: Paul Worley Office: Coulter 409 Email: pmworley@wcu.edu Website: www.paulmworley.com Office Hours: 11:10-12:00 M/F; 2:30-3:30 W; and by appointment
I. Rationale/Purpose
 In this section of the Literature of Culture we will be reading texts that seek to bear witness, inviting the reader not just to acknowledge a variety of economic, social, political, and cultural ills, but also to change how she goes about her daily life. These texts, then, deal directly with moral reflection and cultural diversity. While notions of witness may entail legal and cultural forms of truth, particularly with regard to why the reader would/would not enact the real-world changes sought by the text, these texts nonetheless complicate how we relate to historical events, times, and places. To what extent are the universal truths of human rights and human dignity more important than the historical occurrences that befall a particular individual? In making arguments for sweeping change, why do such texts often elide the individual stories of their authors in order to highlight the more general condition of the author’s social/ethnic/economic/racial class? How do moments of fiction actually bring us closer to the truth than the factual recording of events? How do our own ideas of truth prejudice our readings of these texts? What factors complicate the production of these texts with regard to authority, writing, and their potential reception? Does who reads in the end matter just as much as who’s doing the writing?
II. Course Aims and Objectives: Liberal Studies Objectives (for the entire program)
This course is a Liberal Studies course. The learning goals of the Liberal Studies Program are for students to:
 
Demonstrate the ability to locate, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information;
 
Demonstrate the ability to interpret and use numerical, written, oral and visual data;
 
Demonstrate the ability to read with comprehension, and to write and speak clearly, coherently, and effectively as well as to adapt modes of communication appropriate to an audience;
 
Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze arguments; demonstrate the ability to recognize behaviors and define choices that affect lifelong well-being;
 
Demonstrate an understanding of
o
 
Past human experiences and ability to relate them to the present:
o
 
Different contemporary cultures and their interrelationships;
 
 
2
o
 
Issues involving social institutions, interpersonal and group dynamics, human development and  behavior, and cultural diversity; scientific concepts and methods as well as contemporary issues in science and technology;
o
 
Cultural heritage through its expressions of wisdom, literature and art and their roles in the process of self and social
Liberal Studies Program Perspective Courses
This course is a Perspectives course. The primary goals of the Perspectives courses are:
 
To promote love of learning and to cultivate an active interest in the Liberal Studies;
 
To build on the Core's foundation through practice and refinement of areas of academic emphasis;
 
To provide students with a broadened world view and knowledge base;
 
To provide experiences in the arts, humanities, and social sciences from which connections between disciplines can be revealed;
 
To provide an introduction to the challenges of living in a global society;
 
To create opportunities for reflection on values, and for discussing differences in values in a critical yet tolerant manner;
 
To afford opportunities to make career or disciplinary choices. In addition, each Perspectives course are expected to include emphasis
on one or more
 of the following:
 
Critical analysis of arguments
 
Oral communication
 
Service learning
 
Moral reflection
 
Cultural diversity
 
Any other creative but defensible area of intellectual development that a discipline wants to focus on, and that the  program chooses to adopt.
P6: World Cultures:
This course satisfies the P6 Perspective requirement of the Liberal Studies Program. As stated in the Undergraduate catalogue, students in this course will engage a variety of non-Western cultures via their literature, looking at diverse themes such as gender, economics, and religion. As in all Liberal Studies Perspective offerings, this course will emphasize reading, writing, and the use of information, as well as critical analysis, oral communication, moral reflection, and cultural diversity.
III. Course Materials Required Texts:
Rental Davis, Paul, et. al.
The Bedford Anthology of World Literature: The Modern World, 1650-The Present.
Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009. Supplemental for purchase in bookstore Barnet, Miguel.
 Biography of a Runaway Slave
. Trans. W. Nick Hill. Willimantic, CT: Curbstone Press, 1994. Burgos-Debray, Elisabeth.
 I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala
. Trans. Ann Wright. London: Verso, 1984.
 
Mathabane, Mark.
 Kaffir Boy: An Autobiography
. New York: Free Press, 1986. Satrapi, Marjane.
The Complete Persepolis
. New York: Pantheon, 2003. She, Lao.
 Rickshaw Boy
. Trans. Howard Goldblatt. New York: Harper Perennial, 2010. Additional readings available online through my website
IV. Faculty Expectations of Students/Course Policies
 Statement on Accommodations for students with disabilities:
 
 
3
Office of Disability Services
Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: Western Carolina University is committed to providing equal educational opportunities for students with documented disabilities and/or medical conditions. Students who require reasonable accommodations must identify themselves as having a disability and/or medical condition and provide current diagnostic documentation to the Office of Disability Services. All information is confidential. Please contact the Office of Disability Services at (828) 227-3886 or come by Suite 135 Killian Annex for an appointment.
Student Support Services
Student Support Services provides support to students who are either first-generation, low-income or those who have disclosed a disability with: academic advising, mentoring, one-on-one tutorial support, and workshops focused on career, financial aid and graduate school preparation. You may contact SSS at (828) 227-7127 or email sssprogram@wcu.edu for more information. SSS is located in the Killian Annex, room 138.
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
The Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC),
 located in BELK 207
, provides free small-group course tutoring, one-on-one writing tutoring and academic skills consultations, and online writing and learning resources for all students. All tutoring sessions take place in the WaLC or in designated classrooms on campus. To schedule tutoring appointments, log in to TutorTrac from the WaLC homepage (walc.wcu.edu) or call 828-227-2274. Distance students and students taking classes at Biltmore Park are encouraged to use Smarthinking and the WaLC’s online resources.
 
Students may also take advantage of writing tutoring offered at the Biltmore Park campus on certain days of the week; call 828-227-2274 or log in to TutorTrac and select “Biltmore Park Writing Tutoring” for availabilities. Statement on Academic Integrity (including plagiarism):
Academic Integrity Policy
"I will practice personal and academic integrity" – WCU Community Creed Western Carolina University (WCU) strives to achieve the highest standards of scholarship and integrity. Any violation of the Academic Integrity Policy is a serious offense because it threatens the quality of scholarship and undermines the integrity of the community. Any violation of the Academic Integrity Policy is a violation of the Code of Student Conduct (see dsce.wcu.edu for more information). Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy include:
Cheating
-
 
Using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise.
Plagiarism
-
 
Representing the words or ideas of someone else as one’s own in any academic exercise. Note: WCU instructors reserve the right to use plagiarism prevention software (such as SafeAssignment.com), library resources, as well as Google, Yahoo, and/or other Internet search engines to determine whether or not student papers have been plagiarized. With plagiarism prevention software, instructors may upload student  papers into a searchable database or teach students how to upload their own work as part of the course requirements.
Fabrication
-
 
Creating and/or falsifying information or citation in any academic exercise.
Facilitation
- Helping or attempting to help someone to commit a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy in any academic exercise (e.g. allowing another to copy information during an examination) Faculty members have the right to determine the appropriate sanction(s) for violations of the Academic Integrity Policy within their courses, up to and including a final grade of “F” in the course. Students will be notified, in writing, of any Academic Integrity Policy allegation and have the right to respond to the allegation. The full text of the WCU Academic Integrity Policy, Process, and the Faculty Reporting Form can be found online at: academicintegrity.wcu.edu. Please visit studysmart.wcu.edu for further information.

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